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Editorial Results (free)

1. Budget Report Sees Shrinking Deficits, But Only For Now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An unforeseen flood of revenue is shrinking federal deficits to the lowest level of President Barack Obama's tenure, Congress' nonpartisan budget adviser said Tuesday. But in a report that will fuel both parties in their autumn clash over spending, the analysts also warned that perilously high shortfalls will roar back unless lawmakers act.

2. Tardy Tax Filers Risk Loss of Health Care Subsidies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sign-up season for President Barack Obama's health care law doesn't start for another couple of months, but the next few days are crucial for hundreds of thousands of customers at risk of losing financial aid when they renew coverage for 2016.

3. Fairgrounds’ Future -

It’s hard to imagine that a 65,000-seat stadium could be overlooked. Perhaps it’s because the Liberty Bowl wasn’t in the center of the Mid-South Fairgrounds when the stadium was built in 1965; it was on the eastern side of 155 acres of city-owned land, with a rail spur running along its eastern boundary.

4. Tennessee Officials: New Test Will Better Measure Progress -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — State education officials said Thursday that new assessments in math and English for students in grades three through 11 will provide a better measurement of their progress and make sure they're on track to succeed after graduation.

5. More Millennials Stuck Renting for Years Before Buying Home -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Home ownership, that celebrated hallmark of the American dream, is increasingly on hold for younger Americans.

Short of cash, burdened by student debt and unsettled in their careers, young adults are biding time in apartments for longer periods and buying their first homes later in life.

6. Problem Properties -

Memphis has a crippling issue with blight, and one nonprofit is front and center with changing the culture that led to the city’s inundation of abandoned properties and lots.

Neighborhood Preservation Inc. was founded in 2012 as a court-appointed receiver of properties taken away from neglectful owners. Over the years, it has evolved to become a robust advocate for stronger legislation and development tools to deal with problem properties.

7. Real Deal -

They were tossing around numbers, trying to guess the win total for the 2015 University of Memphis football season.

In the not-too-distant past, the two Highland Hundred members and longtime season-ticket holders might have been able to add their guesses together and still come up short of the six victories needed for their favorite team to be bowl-eligible.

8. US Trade Gap Widens 7 Percent in June as Imports Jump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit increased in June as solid consumer spending pulled in more imports, while the strong dollar restrained exports.

The Commerce Department said Wednesday the trade gap jumped 7 percent to $43.8 billion in June, up from $40.9 billion in May. Imports increased 1.2 percent to $232.4 billion, while exports edged lower to $188.6 billion from $188.7 billion.

9. Wolf River Greenway Targets Raleigh Riverbend -

At the northernmost bend of the Wolf River in Shelby County, the Wolf River Conservancy has plans for a boat ramp onto the Wolf and a nature center that together promise to change the surrounding area of Raleigh where the river turns.

10. Short History of the Nation's Most-Visited National Park -

In 1899, the Appalachian National Park Association began discussing the concept for a 12,000-square-mile park in parts of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Virginia and Tennessee.

During the next century, many individuals, organizations, politicians and nature advocates worked to establish what is now the country’s most visited national park – the Great Smoky Mountains.

11. Unlikely Path -

It all started on whim. Cassius Cash was on his way to band practice at the University of Arkansas when he decided to practice his interview skills instead.

“Someone informed me the (U.S.) Forest Service was doing recruitment, but I had no intention of going in there and landing the internship,” says Cash of that interview for a wildlife biologist internship. “I thought the interview was about as far as I was going to go to chase my dreams.”

12. Congress Passes 3-Month Highway, Transit Aid Patch -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress sent President Barack Obama a three-month bill to keep highway and transit money flowing to states on Thursday, one day before the deadline for a cutoff of funds.

13. Study Says West Tennessee Economy Has Lagged -

West Tennessee’s economy has been lagging behind other regions in the state but is starting to make inroads in employment growth and technology-related hirings, a new report says.

The region’s mayors and economic development officials met Thursday at Jackson State Community College to review the report, The Jackson Sun reported. The study was financed by a $50,000 grant given by the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

14. With No Real Rival, Tennessee Republicans Attack Their Own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

15. Families Face Tough Decisions as Elder-Care Cost Soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Doris Ranzman had followed the expert advice, planning ahead in case she wound up unable to care for herself one day. But when a nursing-home bill tops $14,000 a month, the best-laid plans get tossed aside.

16. Digital Diaspora -

The ubiquitous connectivity that permeates today's workplace is having a profound effect on company cultures, most notably in the digitally-fueled diaspora unfolding in which employees can work from just about anywhere.

17. Editorial: Creatives Prove Memphis’ Cool Factor is Heating Up -

“If you have the vision, and the gumption, you can create something original in Memphis.”

The Memphis News cover story this week features four distinct entrepreneurs who are living, working and creating in Memphis. The aforementioned quote comes from Ben Fant, principal at local marketing firm Farmhouse. He is just one member of the city’s creative class, one guy trying to make something lasting for himself, his employees and his city.

18. Disruptive Innovation Helps Fill in the Gaps -

Being out of work in today’s economy can be daunting. Even as things continue to improve, finding a job can be tough. In addition to the small number of new positions created each day, the entire hiring process takes longer – despite when you find the perfect job.

19. Tennessee’s ‘Fighting 26’ Democrats Work to Stay Relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a health care coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

20. Durham, Agape Hosting Hickory Hill Job Fair -

Agape Child & Family Services, New Hickory Hill Missionary Baptist Church and Durham School Services will host a community job fair Monday, July 20.

The free event will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at New Hickory Hill Church, 6580 East Raines Road.

21. Donate a Backpack for Boys & Girls Clubs -

Parents looking to get a head start on back-to-school shopping can this week get a discount and support the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis at the same time.

Gap stores at Carriage Crossing and Wolfchase Galleria will accept new or gently used backpacks that the Boys & Girls Clubs will give to its members.

22. Tracking Second-Quarter Market Trends -

With the second quarter basically in the rear-view mirror, have the trends that began in the first quarter of the year continued during the second quarter? Or, has there been a reversal? Let’s take a look, starting with the broad global stock markets. All returns are thru Wednesday, June 24:

23. Senate, House Look to Update Bush-Era Education Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's something most Democrats and Republicans in Congress can agree on — an update to the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law is much needed and long overdue.

24. Projects, Issues Spill into Memphis' New Fiscal Year -

On Monday, June 29, two days before the new fiscal year, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was in the back of a house on Ridgewood Drive in Whitehaven.

Wharton was marking the start of a 90-day public works project spanning both fiscal years to build a retention pond for the Days Creek area. The $450,000 project includes removing trees and brush from the drainage area, in an effort to prevent flooding. In September 2014, some homes in the area were heavily damaged in a sudden and prolonged downpour.

25. Haslam Needs to Back Up Call for More Local Control -

If Gov. Bill Haslam is trying to build political capital, he’s making the right move by trying to light a fire under local officials.

He might also want to turn up the flame on his own game.

26. US Economy Not As Bad in First Quarter, Paving Way for Rebound -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy contracted in the first three months of the year, just not as much as previously estimated. More recent data show that the weakness was largely temporary, with a rebound in the works for the April-June quarter.

27. HopeWorks Workshop Aims to Help Memphis Employers Reduce Entry-Level Job Turnover -

Different experiences, different vocabularies, and a different perspective on what it means to go to work each day. The difference, really, between a “job” and a “career.”

Making sense of these differences for the benefit of entry-level employees and their employers is the mission of the free workshop “Finding Talent. Growing Profits.”

28. American Bar Association President Pushes Online Models for Civil Disputes -

The president of the American Bar Association says the traditional method of providing pro bono legal services in civil matters to those who can’t afford to pay for an attorney isn’t working despite best efforts.

29. The Invisible Safety Net -

This week, the Internet is buzzing about the struggles of Gap Inc. and Lucky Magazine. Gap announced it will lay off 250 workers and close 175 stores. From the outside, Lucky appears to be going out of business or reducing operations considerably. At Lucky, there are rumors claiming many people were laid off without any severance. I received an email from a reader about just this issue, and what workers can do to prepare.

30. Memphis City Council’s Distrust of Wharton Boils to Surface -

If it wasn’t obvious in five previous budget seasons, Memphis City Council members made the point clearer Tuesday, June 16, just before they delayed final city budget votes for another week.

They don’t trust the numbers and explanations they are getting from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. as they try to rearrange his $656.5 million budget that was proposed in April.

31. Overbey Has No Regrets for Sponsoring Insure Tennessee -

Republican Sen. Doug Overbey took the road less traveled this year when he sponsored Insure Tennessee at the request of Gov. Bill Haslam.

Despite the legislation’s failure in special and regular sessions, he has no regrets and looks forward to continuing the fight in 2016 for a market-based plan to obtain roughly $1 billion annually through the Affordable Care Act to provide coverage to some 280,000 Tennesseans who are caught in a gap between TennCare and the federal plan.

32. AP Analysis: More 'Phony Numbers' in Reports as Stocks Rise -

NEW YORK (AP) – Those record profits that companies are reporting may not be all they're cracked up to be.

As the stock market climbs ever higher, professional investors are warning that companies are presenting misleading versions of their results that ignore a wide variety of normal costs of running a business to make it seem like they're doing better than they really are.

33. The Soul of Memphis -

What if there was one place that could give a meaningful identity to a new generation of Memphians, preserve the sacred story of Memphis’ social and musical history and communicate the city’s soul to the rest of the world?

34. Commission Begins to Wind Down Budget Season -

Shelby County Commissioners take the first of three votes Monday, June 1, on a county property tax rate for the new fiscal year, and the discussion could begin to tie up the loose ends remaining in the county’s budget season.

35. Why a Shrinking Economy Last Quarter Isn't Cause for Fear -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Another first quarter of the year. Another reversal for the U.S. economy. Another expectation of a rebound to come.

On Friday, the government will likely estimate that the economy shrank in the January-March quarter for a second straight year, depressed by brutal weather, a reeling energy sector and an export slump caused by a higher-valued dollar.

36. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

37. Media Heads Rule Ranks of Best-Paid CEOs -

NEW YORK (AP) – They're not Hollywood stars, they're not TV personalities and they don't play in a rock band, but their pay packages are in the same league.

Six of the 10 highest-paid CEOs last year worked in the media industry, according to a study carried out by executive compensation data firm Equilar and The Associated Press.

38. Top 10 Recruiting Class Might Be Serrano’s Salvation -

Senior right-handed pitcher Will Neely, who opened the TSSAA Class AAA state tournament this week with a no-hitter and a 2-0 win against Bartlett, was the driving force behind Hardin Valley Academy’s run to its first-ever state tournament appearance.

39. Daisy King Still Serving Tearoom Favorites -

Like a proper Southern hostess, Daisy King of Miss Daisy’s Tearoom had trouble turning on the “closed” sign. If guests wanted to snag a table after hours, she couldn’t help but oblige.

40. What Grads Must Do to Secure Employment -

Career counselors at many Tennessee colleges and universities say interest from corporate recruiters is higher than they’ve seen it in years.

There are more job postings, internship opportunities, pre-employment trainee classes and technology training programs for all skill levels, but if a recent graduate needs help in pursuing a career, schools want the new alums to come back to them.

41. Southbrook Tests Wharton Administration Shake-Up -

It didn’t take very long for the city of Memphis’ new chief administrative officer to make a tough call.

And when Jack Sammons came down on the side of pulling back city funding for Southbrook Mall, political allies and foes of Mayor A C Wharton Jr. watched to see if he would go along with the decision.

42. Conquering Fear of Heights on Mt. LeConte -

I was standing on the edge of a cliff during a hike to Mt. LeConte about two weeks ago.

Holding onto a thin metal handrail cable, I was walking a path maybe two feet wide on jagged rock with some water running through it, on the side of the mountain, about 4,000 feet above sea level.

43. Investors Pumping Hundreds of Millions Into Tennessee Startups -

The assignment sounded simple enough: Find out whether more money is coming into Nashville for startups.

If so, where is it coming from and what does it means to entrepreneurs, investors and the rest of us?

44. Kid Coders -

A new nonprofit has launched in Memphis formed around the notion that where children are born shouldn’t pre-determine the opportunity they have to get hands-on experience – and build careers – in tech and computer-related fields.

45. A Hazy View of US Economy Emerges Ahead of April Jobs Report -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When the government reports Friday on job growth during April, it could help clarify an increasingly nagging question:

Just how strong is the U.S. economy?

The picture has grown hazier of late. Employers added only 126,000 jobs in March, ending a yearlong streak of monthly gains above 200,000. For April, economists predict a rebound to 222,500 added jobs.

46. Survey: Hiring By US Businesses Slows Sharply in April -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. companies hired in April at the slowest pace in nearly a year and a half, a private survey found, as the strong dollar dragged down overseas sales and energy companies cut back on spending in the face of lower oil prices.

47. US Trade Deficit Jumps to 6-Year High of $51.4 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit in March swelled to the highest level in more than six years, propelled by a flood of imports that may have sapped the U.S. economy of any growth in the first quarter.

48. Applications for US Unemployment Aid Plunge to 15-Year Low -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of Americans seeking unemployment aid plummeted to the lowest level in 15 years last week, evidence that employers are laying off few workers despite a sharp slowdown in economic growth.

49. SEC Pushes for Display of Link Between Pay and Performance -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal regulators have taken a step toward requiring public companies to show the relationship between the compensation of their top executives and the company's financial performance.

50. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

51. Sounds Like a Hit for Neighbors -

For months, sounds of construction surrounded the Nashville Sounds’ sparkling new First Tennessee Park in Germantown.

The constant thump-thump-thump of pounding jackhammers competed with the irritating, high-pitched beeps of vehicles backing up. Ka-ching! Cranes lifted steel beams into place, keeping time with a syncopated thrumming of never-ending drilling. Ka-ching!

52. Editorial: Law Week Highlights Changing Nature of Freedom’s Challenge -

Something so integral to freedom must be an immovable force that is rigid in its consistency and unyielding to the elements and the passage of time.

Or so you would think if you regarded freedom as being kept in some sort of bastion for its own protection.

53. Biblical Lessons Lost in Lack of Health Care Debate -

Tennessee’s legislators spent hours this session arguing over guns and whether to pass a law making the Bible the state book of Tennessee.

In fact, the Bible bill took two days of debate in the House, where it passed, and thorough discussion in the Senate, before it died – at least until next year.

54. Hopson Wants New Funding After Closing Budget Gap -

The Shelby County Schools board likely will meet in special session Tuesday, April 21, to vote on a budget proposal to send to the Shelby County Commission.

As he announced that an earlier $15 million gap in school system revenue and expenditures had been bridged, schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson proposed last week adding $14.2 million to the budget proposal in “high leverage investments.”

55. Hopson Proposes Schools Budget Additions, Health Insurance Changes -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson wants the SCS board to consider adding $14.2 million to the school system’s still-forming budget proposal.

Hopson added the list of 16 items for the board’s consideration at a budget retreat Thursday, April 16, in which he and his staff announced they had bridged a gap between revenues and expenditures of $15 million without the extra items.

56. Industry: Global Digital Music Sales Match Physical for First Time -

LONDON (AP) – Revenue from digital music matched that from physical albums and discs for the first time in 2014, a global industry body said Tuesday.

The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry's annual report said digital and physical sales each accounted for 46 percent of the $14.97 billion in global music revenues. Income from performance rights and synchronization revenue made up the rest.

57. Shafer Seeking County Property Tax Rate Reduction -

The chairwoman of the Shelby County Commission’s budget committee is hoping to reduce the county’s property tax rate by the time the commission approves a budget for its new fiscal year that begins July 1.

58. County Commission Looks for Schools Budget -

Shelby County Commissioners have plenty of work to begin on the $1.18 billion budget proposal submitted to the body this week by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

59. Events -

The Peabody will kick off its 2015 rooftop party season Thursday, April 16, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the hotel, 149 Union Ave. The event will feature performances by Hollywood and special guest Shaggy, themed buffet and drink specials. Admission is $15. Parties continue Thursdays through Aug. 13. Visit peabodymemphis.com.

60. Walgreens Aims to Close About 200 US Stores -

Walgreens will shutter about 200 U.S. stores as part of an expanded cost reduction push, but the nation's largest drugstore chain has no plans to shrink in the wake of its combination with European health and beauty retailer Alliance Boots.

61. Events -

Whitehaven Healthy Community Day will be held Saturday, April 11, from 8 a.m. to noon at Methodist South Hospital, 1300 Wesley Drive. The event will include a 5K timed run at 8 a.m., two-mile health walk at 8:30 a.m., and health fair from 9 a.m. to noon. Visit methodisthealth.org/healthwalk or call 901-516-3580.

62. Legislators Not Moved by Hymns, Reason -

The words of “We Shall Overcome” and “Wade in the Water” resonate through the halls as Insure Tennessee supporters descend on the Legislative Plaza for a key vote on the plan to provide coverage to 280,000 working Tennesseans.

63. County Budget Proposal Includes $6 Million Dilemma -

Some of the numbers crucial to the bottom line of Shelby County’s budget for the upcoming fiscal year are still expected with about four months left in the fiscal year.

But at the outset of county commission budget hearings that begin Wednesday, April 8, here’s what the dollar figures look like.

64. Luttrell's $1.1 Billion Budget Plan Goes to Commission Wednesday -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell takes a $1.18 billion budget proposal to Shelby County Commissioners in Wednesday, April 8, committee sessions.

65. End of Robust Hiring Streak Raises Doubts About Job Market -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For months, the U.S. economy's strength has been flagging.

Manufacturing slowed. Fewer homes were built. Cheaper gas failed to ignite consumer spending. Yet month after month, employers kept on hiring vigorously.

66. Aramark Corrections Center Food Contract Approved -

Aramark Correctional Services Inc. will take over food service at the Shelby County Corrections Center, four years after the private company did the same at the Shelby County Jail and Jail East.

67. Internet Outages Reveal Gaps in US Broadband Infrastructure -

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) – When vandals sliced a fiber-optic cable in the Arizona desert last month, they did more than time-warp thousands of people back to an era before computers, credit cards or even phones. They exposed a glaring vulnerability in the nation's Internet infrastructure: no backup systems in many places.

68. As Fed Weighs a Rate Hike, US Economy is Looking a Bit Paler -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Just as the Federal Reserve seems to be inching toward an interest rate hike because of the strengthening U.S. job market, its task is getting more complicated:

Several key sectors of the economy are flashing some signs of weakness.

69. Council Weighs City Debt Payment Restructuring Proposal -

Memphis City Council members discuss and could vote Tuesday, March 17, on a restructuring of the city’s debt payments.

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. has proposed the restructuring to delay a balloon payment in 2020 that would see the city’s annual payment go from $15 million the year before to $30 million in that fiscal year.

70. Tanger Outlets to Open Southaven Mall in November -

What is now a field near Interstate 55 and Church Road in Southaven, Miss., soon will become an outlet-shopping destination.

The 310,000-square-foot Tanger Factory Outlets Centers Inc. shopping center should be ready for shoppers by Nov. 19, just in time for Christmas.

71. Holding On -

The national outlook for traditional enclosed malls is bleak. No new enclosed mall has been built in the U.S. since 2006. More than 24 have closed since 2010, and an additional 60 are teetering on the edge, according to data from Green Street Advisors. Around 15 percent of malls nationwide are expected to close in the next decade.

72. Hard to ‘Mansplain’ Workplace Gender Issues -

“Jane felt like screaming at Dick after he manterrupted her in the staff meeting, bropropriated her idea and then spent the afternoon mansplaining it back to her.’’

That’s an actual sentence – if people are willing to use gender-specific language that’s gaining popularity to describe unwanted workplace behavior.

73. Battle of the Band(width) -

Joyce Coltrin’s business is wandering in Bradley County’s technological wilderness. And it’s likely to remain there – because of legal threats – until the General Assembly changes state law.

74. Good News for Some of Us: Other People are Quitting Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Quitting your job – all but unheard of during and after the Great Recession – is becoming more common again. That could mean pay raises are coming for more Americans.

75. Wharton Still Mum on Extent of Shake-Up -

The move of Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority Board chairman and former Memphis City Council member Jack Sammons back to City Hall is not a done deal just yet.

76. US Economic Growth in Q4 Revised Down to 2.2 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy slowed more sharply in the final three months of the year than initial estimates, reflecting weaker business stockpiling and a bigger trade deficit.

The Commerce Department said Friday that the economy as measured by the gross domestic product grew at an annual rate of 2.2 percent in the October-December quarter, weaker than the 2.6 percent first estimated last month. It marked a major slowdown from the third quarter, which had been the strongest growth in 11 years.

77. UT Board of Trustees Endorses Plan for Big Changes at School -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Faced with a projected $377 million funding gap over 10 years, the University of Tennessee has put together a plan that could mean some tough choices ahead for the school and its students.

78. Applications for US Jobless Aid Rise to 313,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More Americans sought unemployment aid last week, though the number of applications was still consistent with steady hiring.

The Labor Department said Thursday that weekly applications rose 31,000 to a seasonally adjusted 313,000, the most in six weeks. The four-week average, a less volatile measure, increased 11,500 to 294,500.

79. The ABCs of Decision Leadership -

When we, as managers, delegate decision-making authority, we don’t delegate accountability because we cannot. And lest we forget, one bad decision, in the face of uncertainty, can destroy so much value.

80. Harris’ Bill Faces Opposition From Memphis City Council Members -

Legislation by Sen. Lee Harris requiring local governments to hold a referendum before they take on “extraordinary” debt could run into opposition from his own City Council and municipal leaders across Tennessee.

81. Wal-Mart Raises Could Help Lift Pay in Lower-Wage Industries -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The modest raises that Wal-Mart has said it will give its lowest-paid workers provide a glimmer of hope for lower-wage workers in other companies and industries.

Other retailers and some fast food restaurants may now feel compelled to follow suit to retain their workers and attract others to fill openings, economists said.

82. Luttrell Scolds State Legislators -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell says the political forces that defeated the Insure Tennessee proposal of Gov. Bill Haslam this month in Nashville weren’t in a fight with Washington and President Barack Obama

83. Crosstown Crossroads -

Richard Spore and his colleague at the Memphis office of the Bass Berry & Sims law firm have worked on several ambitious, game-changing projects like the transformation of Overton Square and Bass Pro Shops’ redevelopment of The Pyramid.

84. Insure Tennessee Fails to Win Sound Bite Test -

Fresh off a resounding November re-election victory, Gov. Bill Haslam ran smack dab into the reality of Tennessee politics: The Republican Party abhors anything connected to President Barack Obama.

85. Wharton Calls for Outside Fairgrounds Review -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. told the Memphis Rotary Club Tuesday, Feb. 10, that the ambitious recasting of the Mid-South Fairgrounds – a project that is solely a City Hall creation at this point -- is going to get a second look from outside consultants.

86. Critical Link -

If you’re a wine lover along the East Coast – everywhere from Florida to the Mid-Atlantic and New England - chances are a Memphis-based third-party logistics provider played a significant role in getting your vino into your glass.

87. Anthem Breach: A Gap in Federal Health Privacy Law? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Insurers aren't required to encrypt consumers' data under a 1990s federal law that remains the foundation for health care privacy in the Internet age – an omission that seems striking in light of the major cyberattack against Anthem.

88. Using Creativity in Your Job Search -

It goes without saying. Applying online can be a long, difficult process. You’re often left wondering if anyone has read your resume, or if they even know you exist at all.

Earlier this week, I read a story of a creative job seeker who found work passing out resumes at a train station. This inspirational tale reminded me of my own job search years ago.

89. Luttrell Warns of Tax Hike Without Insure Tennessee -

Two hours before the state Senate committee vote in Nashville that signaled the death of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Medicaid expansion proposal, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said failure to pass the expansion could mean a county property tax hike to fund Shelby County’s public safety net hospital.

90. Luttrell Warns of Tax Hike Without Insure Tennessee -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell urged Tennessee legislators Wednesday, Feb. 4, to approve the proposed Insure Tennessee Medicaid expansion as the Legislature continues its special session in Nashville on the issue.

91. Both Sides Dig In for Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 280,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

92. Both Sides Dig In For Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 200,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

93. Drowning in Student Loan Debt -

Three-and-a-half years after graduating from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Yasameen Hoffman is still trying to land the kind of full-time job that will help her start paying off her student loan.

94. Record iPhone Sales Drive Blowout Quarter for Apple -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple had another blowout quarter thanks to its new plus-sized iPhones, which helped the company smash sales records for the holiday season.

Apple said Tuesday that it sold 74.5 million iPhones during the three months that ended Dec. 31, beating analysts' expectations for the latest models of Apple's most popular gadget, introduced in September.

95. Home Services Keep Seniors Independent -

Sooner or later, most people end up caring for aging mothers and fathers or become seniors themselves, wondering who to turn to when independent daily living becomes impossible.

Both propositions are frightening and stressful.

96. Trucking Industry in ‘Desperate’ Need of Drivers -

With demand on the upswing thanks to improving economic growth and lower fuel prices, a scarcity of truck drivers could put the brakes on the trucking industry and cripple a critical piece of global supply chains.

97. Taxing Question -

With gas prices in a historic plunge, the idea of hiking state and federal gas taxes and fees to pay for transportation infrastructure improvements is gaining traction.

Democratic and Republican leaders in both chambers of Congress in recent weeks have signaled a willingness to approve an increase in the federal gas tax to help fund improvements to the nation’s crumbling roads and bridges. Meanwhile, a new statewide coalition has launched to support an increase and reform in Tennessee’s transportation fees.

98. Agape Receives Grant From March of Dimes -

The March of Dimes Tennessee Chapter has awarded a grant to Agape Child & Family Services to support its Families In Transition, or FIT, ministry.

FIT serves homeless pregnant and parenting mothers and their children. The grant’s focus is on improving maternity and birth outcomes for the underserved maternal and child health needs in the Mid-South.

99. Agape Receives Grant From March of Dimes -

The March of Dimes Tennessee Chapter has awarded a grant to Agape Child & Family Services to support its Families In Transition, or FIT, ministry.

FIT serves homeless pregnant and parenting mothers and their children. The grant’s focus is on improving maternity and birth outcomes for the underserved maternal and child health needs in the Mid-South.

100. Federal Deficit in October-December Up Slightly at $176.7 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal deficit for the first three months of the budget year is up slightly from the same period a year ago, reflecting the absence of a special payment from mortgage company Freddie Mac that helped narrow the gap in 2014.