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Editorial Results (free)

1. Paper & Clay Owner Up for Martha Stewart Award -

Memphian Brit McDaniel, the founder of handmade ceramics studio Paper & Clay, is a finalist for the national 2014 Martha Stewart “American Made” award.

If she wins one of the 10 available awards, it will mean a trip to New York City for the award ceremony, a feature in Martha Stewart Living Magazine and $10,000 to grow her business.

2. Jones’ Wide Net Gathers Old Friends, Top Prospects -

Butch Jones was sitting in the office of Knoxville’s South-Doyle High School athletic director and football coach Clark Duncan during a visit to see recruit Jocquez Bruce last winter.

3. Which Titans Team Will Show Up at Cincinnati? -

You only get one chance to make a first impression, as the old saying goes.

Such was the case Sunday at LP Field when the home fans got their first real look at Ken Whisenhunt’s first edition of the Tennessee Titans.

4. Education Secretary Praises Local Schools Leaders -

Sustainability is a term associated with environmental efforts, though innovation is a much more popular term across causes from economic development to education reform.

But when U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan came to Memphis this month as the last stop on a three-state bus tour of school districts, it was the word sustainability that came up more often than innovation.

5. Old School, New Day -

Vasco Smith remembers working the polls at Fairview Junior High School in the 1960s as a child. His job was simple – to hand out campaign literature and not stray within the 100-foot limit by law between poll workers and the polling place in the gymnasium.

6. Clueing THEA -

THEA crops up in crosswords occasionally. In an easy puzzle, it’ll be clued as “Ellington’s ‘Take ___ Train’.” Or “Mr. T’s ‘___ Team’.” In more challenging grids, THEA’s clues include “Actress Gill,” “German author von Harbou,” or “Mother of Eos.” Snobby solvers don’t like any of these clues; thus, they don’t like THEA. That’s about to change. Henceforth, a new clue for THEA will be available. I predict a change of attitude toward the answer.

7. Paper & Clay Owner Up for Martha Stewart Award -

Memphian Brit McDaniel, the founder of handmade ceramics studio Paper & Clay, is a finalist for the national 2014 Martha Stewart “American Made” award.

If she wins one of the 10 available awards, it will mean a trip to New York City for the award ceremony, a feature in Martha Stewart Living Magazine and $10,000 to grow her business.

8. Events -

Remington College Memphis campus will hold the 3 Lives blood drive, a national effort to recruit minority blood donors, Tuesday, Sept. 16, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Remington, 2710 Nonconnah Blvd. Visit 3lives.com.

9. Tennessee Steps Up the Fight Against Blight -

While the national economy is still rebounding from the 2008 housing crisis, foreclosures, vacant homes and blighted properties are a lingering issue many markets throughout the country have to address.

10. Titans Buying What New Coaches Selling -

NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Titans did what few believed they could do when they went into Kansas City and dominated the Chiefs on Sunday.

And while one win is hardly enough for Titans fans to start making Super Bowl reservations, there is the sense that something is vastly different about this organization from the past few years.

11. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

12. This week in Memphis history: September 12-18 -

2004: Usher at FedExForum, the first show at the new arena followed days later by Alan Jackson and Martin McBride.

13. Legal Issues Await Mob Attack Investigation -

Memphis police could make more arrests in the Poplar Plaza mob attack, but investigators believe they have the teenagers who started the riot on the parking lot of the Kroger supermarket Saturday, Sept. 6, that injured three people.

14. Power Play -

When the Tennessee Valley Authority board voted in August to build a new power plant in Southwest Memphis, it was a decision based on factors larger than the power needs in Memphis.

But it was also a decision that is just as important for Memphis as the decision to build the existing Allen Fossil Plant there 55 years ago.

15. Authors, Readers Converge for Book Festival -

Earlier this year, interest in the first Mid-South Book Festival, scheduled to take place later this month, began to reach what seemed like a fever pitch, according to Literacy Mid-South executive director Kevin Dean.

16. The Best Education Comes When Traveling -

Proponents of formal classroom education, the following message might not be for you.

In my opinion, the best education comes on the road, even if it means taking the kids out of school for a few days.

17. Report: Cost to Raise Child in Memphis Tops $208,000 -

Memphis is one of the least expensive cities in which to raise a child.

That’s according to the personal finance website NerdWallet, which looked at the average cost of raising a child to the age of 18 in 288 major cities. In Memphis, the site found, it costs a little more than $208,000 on average – compared to, on the high end of the scale, $540,514 to raise a child in New York City.

18. Late Cuts, Pickups Reveal Titans’ Talent Shortfall -

What exactly does it say about the Tennessee Titans that, after they made their own cut to 53 players, they were still sifting through the scrap heap of other teams’ cuts and making five more moves?

19. Knoxville-Area Real Estate Bouncing Back -

Knoxville’s housing market seems to be making steady gains after the setbacks of the Great Recession.

Doyle Webb, president of the Knoxville Area Association of Realtors and a Realtor with Realty Executives Associates, says the area’s housing market will continue to improve over the next five to 10 years and surpass its 2007 sales’ levels.

20. Will More Rentals Slow Rising Home Prices? -

Hardly a day goes by that a residential real estate broker is not asked: “When will it end?”

Elliot Eisenberg, Ph.D., authors Elliot Eisenberg’s Brief Blog and sends it daily to subscribers. Here’s what he had to say on the subject in his August 25 edition:

21. September 5-11: This Week in Memphis History -

2004: Open house for the new FedExForum, the new $250 million arena south of the Beale Street entertainment district.

1981: Ozzy Osbourne at the Orpheum with Def Leppard opening the show. Osbourne was touring with a band that featured guitarist Randy Rhoades who would die less than a year later in a plane crash. The Memphis show finished abruptly when Osbourne had to stop performing because of a broken rib he sustained earlier on the tour after falling off stage.

22. Al Green Among Kennedy Center Honorees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's a rare honor for an artist to receive accolades from the president, let alone have him sing one of your tunes.

Now Al Green can claim both, knowing that President Barack Obama is a fan. Green is among five artists receiving this year's Kennedy Center Honors, the national awards for influencing American culture through the arts, the center announced Thursday.

23. What Does Local Really Mean? -

I make my living helping retail entrepreneurs, franchisees, national restaurants and retailers find the best home for their business in the Mid-South.

Over the past 11 years, I had the opportunity to work with several national branded franchise quick service restaurants, sometimes known in the industry as a “QSR” concept. Many of these franchises are owned by local Mid-South entrepreneurs.

24. Dishcrawl Heads to Broad Avenue in October -

Next month, a group of food-loving “Dishcrawlers” will stroll by the Broad Avenue Water Tower Pavilion and the neighborhood’s variety of storefronts on their way to three yet-to-be-announced restaurants, part of the series of regular gatherings of anyone eager to explore the city’s restaurant scene.

25. Report: Cost to Raise Child in Memphis Tops $208,000 -

Memphis is one of the least expensive cities in which to raise a child.

That’s according to the personal finance website NerdWallet, which looked at the average cost of raising a child to the age of 18 in 288 major cities. In Memphis, the site found, it costs a little more than $208,000 on average – compared to, on the high end of the scale, $540,514 to raise a child in New York City.

26. Push for Broader Minority Business Participation Grows -

A larger share of business for minority- and women-owned local businesses should begin with an inventory that matches existing businesses with existing opportunities.

And three leaders of the recently revived effort to build that share of business say from there the local Memphis economy overall can grow.

27. UTHSC Expands Footprint -

Of the six colleges and schools of pharmacy in the state, the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s College of Pharmacy by far has the lowest annual tuition – around $21,000 as compared to about $31,500 for the next-lowest, Union University.

28. Veteran Titan Gives Human Face to ALS Awareness -

A year ago, Tim Shaw was trying to hang on to his roster spot with the Tennessee Titans.

Now, at age 30, Shaw revealed last week that he is suffering from ALS, commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

29. Embracing Cremation -

As business decisions go, this was a tricky one.

Jeff and Steve Murphy, owners of Music City Mortuary, opened their Nashville business in 2001, catering primarily to the needs of other funeral directors, providing transportation, embalming and preparation services, shipping – everything a mortuary business provides.

30. Attendance Woes to Bring Changes at AutoZone Park -

As the Memphis Redbirds closed out their regular-season home schedule at AutoZone Park this past week, pitcher Tim Cooney set a franchise record with his 14th win and the Redbirds widened their lead over second-place Nashville in the Pacific Coast League American Southern Division.

31. Greenprint Advocates Tout Range of Benefits -

After being lampooned for years as one of the worst metro areas in the country for bicyclists and pedestrians, the Memphis region is poised to make a huge leap forward in developing a regional greenway and trail system.

32. Cohen: Ferguson Police Could Have ‘Shot to Wound’ -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen said police in Ferguson, Mo., could have shot to wound instead of shot to kill Michael Brown in the fatal incident there this month that has prompted national and international reaction to a number of race-related issues beyond the shooting.

33. US Home Price Gains Slow in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. home prices increased at a slower pace in June – a cooldown that could continue for several more months.

The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller 20-city home price index rose 8.1 percent in June from 12 months earlier, according to a Tuesday report. That's down from 9.4 percent a month earlier and the smallest annual gain since December 2012.

34. Discover Labor Day Getaways Close to Home -

Labor Day, the traditional end to summer. Public swimming pools are closing and college football is getting underway.

It’s also time for one last getaway before fall settles in, especially if you have school-age children.

35. Goodwill Center Helps Job Seekers Reclaim Dreams -

The event was held in the shadow of the shuttered Raleigh Springs Mall, in the expanded section of the Goodwill store at 3830 Austin Peay Highway. It was the grand opening of the Goodwill Job Center.

36. Veteran’s HomeCare Franchise Aims for Place in Market -

There are always adjustments to be made, such as when a middle-school-aged boy moves from Philadelphia to Birmingham, Ala.

Brian Walker still recalls that day in gym class when the P.E. instructor was taking roll. When Walker heard his name called, he answered the way he always had in his young life: “Yo.”

37. Vols: Looks Like 6-6 Season -

Pull out your 2014 schedules, UT fans.

Fall camp is done, and it’s time to get in game-week mode with the season opener against Utah State fast approaching.

So go to the little box next to each of UT’s opponents on the 2014 schedule and pick the winner.

38. Vanderbilt Students Find Happiness in Music City -

As the Class of 2018 begins to poke around the Vanderbilt University campus, the newest Commodores will be met with the highest of expectations.

“This class is projected to have the highest academic quality in our history as measured by high school class rank and SAT scores,’’ says Doug Christiansen, vice provost for enrollment and dean of admissions.

39. Source: Horizon Under Contract To Be Purchased -

The Horizon, an uncompleted 16-story residential tower overlooking the Mississippi River on the southern end of Downtown, could change hands soon.

A yet-to-be-identified buyer is under contract to purchase the tower, according to sources familiar with the effort.

40. Westin Memphis Honored for Community Service -

When an F-5 tornado tore through Angela Copeland’s hometown of Moore, Okla., last year, she initially felt helpless.

41. Graceland Manager Maps Global Outposts -

The recession and changes over the last nine years in the companies owning 85 percent of Elvis Presley Enterprises played a role in delaying plans for the expansion of Graceland into a 120-acre campus in Whitehaven.

42. I Choose Memphis: Andrés Flores -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Andrés Flores

43. A Perfect Union -

Union Ave Books buzzes with activity on a Tuesday afternoon as families from San Francisco and Paris browse the shelves in the children’s section.

A local customer, owner Flossie McNabb explains, has brought the travelers to her store during their East Tennessee visit.

44. Veterans Affairs Secretary Visits Memphis -

U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert A. McDonald visited the Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center Thursday, Aug. 14, at the end of a two-day visit to the Bluff City that also included a speech to the 70th annual National Convention of American Veterans, known as AMVETS.

45. August 15-21: This week in Memphis history -

2013: Norah Jones was a surprise guest at a Levitt Shell concert by Cory Chisel and the Wild Rovers Tour.

1984: The Center City Commission reported $450 million in construction Downtown since 1976, counting public as well as private financing. The construction boom included the Memphis Plaza Hotel, Morgan Keegan Tower and the Scimitar Building.

46. Veterans Secretary Visits Memphis -

U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert A. McDonald visited the Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center Thursday, Aug. 14, at the end of a two-day visit to the Bluff City that also included a speech to the 70th annual National Convention of American Veterans, known as AMVETS.

47. National TV Shuns Grizzlies in 2014-2015 -

At home or on the road, it hasn’t mattered where the Grizzlies opened the NBA season since moving from Vancouver to Memphis. For 13 straight years, they have started the season with a loss.

If that is to change in the 2014-15 season, it will happen at FedExForum on Oct. 29 when the Grizzlies play the Minnesota Timberwolves, who will be minus Kevin Love but will have 2014 No. 1 draft pick Andrew Wiggins, assuming the much-anticipated Minnesota-Cleveland trade becomes official.

48. U of M’s Rudd Touts Freshmen Growth -

The student population at the University of Memphis is growing, but the city’s largest higher education institution is becoming more selective about those who apply for admission.

And University of Memphis President David Rudd said in the coming academic year, his first at the helm of the university, he plans to introduce the first needs-based scholarship program in the 102-year history of the institution as well as offer a flat tuition rate for students who continue on the school’s trajectory for graduation and attaining degrees.

49. Graceland Expansion Ready to Rock -

After nine years of different ownership and talk of a $250 million expansion beyond Elvis Presley’s mansion, the revitalization of Graceland into a 120-acre campus gets underway Thursday, Aug. 14.

50. Pinch District Could Lose Historic Designation -

The Pinch District, one of the city’s oldest commercial districts, could lose its designation on the National Register of Historic Places, a move that would jeopardize existing buildings but possibly make some new development easier.

51. This week in Memphis history: August 8-14 -

1993: What would be the city’s last civic drive for a National Football League franchise was taking season ticket pledges with former Green Bay Packers middle linebacker Willie Davis among those in the ownership group, led by Billy Dunavant of Dunavant Enterprises.

52. Springing to Life -

When Ridgeland, Miss.-based development firm the Bryan Co. broke ground on The Horizon condominium tower in 2007, it was at the peak of the housing bubble and optimism from elected officials and Downtown boosters was equally high.

53. American Marketing Association Memphis Chapter Preps for New Events -

The Memphis chapter of the American Marketing Association is gearing up to be a hub of new networking and educational opportunities for local marketing professionals in the city.

Along with the finalization of its Memphis charter, the organization has elected a new board of directors packed with experienced marketing leaders from the area. The chapter also plans to offer “unexpected, unique and creative” benefits to help it stand out from traditional professional organizations.

54. City Reviews Ridesharing Policies -

The city of Memphis is reviewing policies and procedures related to vehicles for hire after a firestorm related to ridesharing services such as Lyft and Uber erupted earlier this summer.

City permits administrator Aubrey Howard said the city had not yet initiated patrols to catch Lyft and Uber drivers in the act, but has instead launched a review of the city’s policies.

55. Ag Tourism Touted as Way to Boost Rural Economies -

CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. (AP) – With its sweet fruit-flavored liqueurs, a working farm and eccentric cast of characters – including a dancing lemon – Bloomery Plantation Distillery has attracted tourists from every U.S. state and countries as far away as Laos and Iceland.

56. I Choose Memphis: Tim Young -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Tim Young

57. Carlisle Corp. Buys Sharky’s Property -

6201 Poplar Ave.
Memphis, TN 38119
Sale Amount: $2.9 million

Sale Date: July 29, 2014
Buyer: Wendelta Property Holdings LLC
Seller: Aaron Muschel
Details: An affiliate of Carlisle Corp. has paid $2.9 million for the recently closed Sharky’s Gulf Grill at 6201 Poplar Ave.

58. Pera: Development, Re-Signing Gasol Keys to Success -

Grizzlies controlling owner Robert Pera introduced new additions to the team’s front office during a press conference Friday, Aug. 1, at FedExForum, and took questions from reporters. But mainly he delivered the message that the franchise’s path to contending for a championship will come through player development and not free agency.

59. UTHSC Professor Receives $2.5 Million Grant -

Donna K. Hathaway, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Advanced Practice and Doctoral Studies in the College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received a $2.5 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, a subsidiary of the National Institutes of Health.

60. As US Job Market Strengthens, Many Don't Feel It -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For millions of workers, happy days aren't quite here again.

Though the U.S. unemployment rate has plunged since the start of last year to a five-year low of 6.1 percent, the Gallup Organization has found that consumers' view of the economy is the glummest it's been in seven months.

61. UTHSC Professor Receives $2.5 Million Grant -

Donna K. Hathaway, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Advanced Practice and Doctoral Studies in the College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received a $2.5 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, a subsidiary of the National Institutes of Health.

62. Riverside Debate Reflects Pace of Riverfront Change -

On the day that the Memphis Grizzlies Foundation unveiled plans to add a soccer field, volleyball court and six-station fitness loop to Tom Lee Park, city engineers got an earful in the Beale Street Landing breezeway from critics of other changes to the stretch of Riverside Drive that runs by the park and the landing.

63. Simmons First National Moves Into Tennessee -

A similar history, a foundation in agriculture lending and growth potential attracted Arkansas-based Simmons First National Corp. to buy Community First Bancshares Inc. of Union City, Tenn., and its $1.9 billion subsidiary First State Bank, says Simmons’ Chairman and CEO George A. Makris.

64. Fast Food Workers Prepare to Escalate Wage Demands -

CHICAGO (AP) – Fast food workers say they're prepared to escalate their campaign for higher wages and union representation, starting with a national convention in suburban Chicago where more than 1,000 workers will discuss the future of the effort that has spread to dozens of cities in less than two years.

65. New Life for Old Malls -

Since 1957, when the first modern, fully enclosed shopping mall was built in Edina, Minnesota, shopping became an American pastime. New shopping malls changed the landscape in communities across the country at the rate of 140 a year.

66. Heritage Trail Project Receive Arts Grant -

The National Endowment for the Arts has awarded a $150,000 grant to the city’s Heritage Trail project for planning, design and public art.

Heritage Trail is the city’s ambitious project to redevelop a large area south of FedExForum and into South Memphis. It includes the proposed demolition of Foote Homes, the last of the city’s large public housing developments.

67. ‘Drive for Progress’ -

There’s a duality of meaning implied in the name of the civic organization where Nancy Coffee serves as president and CEO.

68. Heritage Trail Project Receives Arts Grant -

The National Endowment for the Arts has awarded a $150,000 grant to the city’s Heritage Trail project for planning, design and public art.

Heritage Trail is the city’s ambitious project to redevelop a large area south of FedExForum and into South Memphis. It includes the proposed demolition of Foote Homes, the last of the city’s large public housing developments.

69. Events -

Stage Door Productions will present a locally inspired production of “Godspell” Friday, July 18, to Sunday, July 20, and July 25-27 at the Kroc Center, 800 East Parkway. Buy tickets at stagedoormemphis.org.

70. More Than Delta -

MESSAGE FROM HOME. A while back – right after I wrote a column blasting Delta, the Airport Authority and Garage Gargantua – I was invited to tour the airport and learn a thing or two or 50 about where so much of what and where we are takes off and lands every day.

71. Youth Movement -

It’s a good time to be a young professional in Memphis who wants to do more than punch a clock.

From the Greater Memphis Chamber to the New Memphis Institute, plus groups like the Memphis Urban League Young Professionals and Leadership Memphis, among others, the tent of movers, shakers and impact makers has expanded considerably in Memphis of late.

72. City: Rideshare Services Need Permits for Airport Use -

The city of Memphis will ask popular ridesharing services such as Uber and Lyft to cease and desist operations until they acquire city permits.

“We know (Uber and Lyft) are doing business in Memphis without the required permit,” said Memphis spokeswoman Dewanna Smith. “We will send them a cease-and-desist notice along with an application and links to our ordinances. That letter has only recently been approved by counsel and will be going out soon.”

73. Dance Teacher Spreads Love of Dance From Cordova -

Arman Sahakyan, born in Armenia’s capital city of Yerevan, started taking dance classes as a 6-year-old.

Fast forward almost three decades, and today the 33-year-old remains committed to dance as an art form – only now he’s also spreading that enthusiasm to others as the owner of Dancing With Arman, a dance studio in Cordova.

74. Downside of Low US Mortgage Rates: Less Selling -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Would-be home sellers across the country are grappling with a once-in-a-lifetime problem: They have mortgage rates so absurdly low it would hurt them financially to sell.

75. Grizz Renew Commitment to Raise $2.5M for St. Jude -

The Memphis Grizzlies have announced that they have committed to raising $2.5 million over 10 years to continue helping St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in the research and treatment of childhood cancer and other deadly diseases.

76. We’re All Invited -

MEMPHIS, SERVED IN THE SHELL. Following up last week’s column, this from a reader:

“We have no civic pride, half the population is intent on killing as many as they can and the other part lives behind walls or gates. There was a time in the fifties when you could leave your front door unlocked and keys in the car.”

77. City to Issue Cease-and-Desist Notices to Rideshare Services -

The city of Memphis will ask popular ridesharing services such as Uber and Lyft to cease and desist operations until they acquire city permits.

“We know (Uber and Lyft) are doing business in Memphis without the required permit,” said Memphis spokeswoman Dewanna Smith. “We will send them a cease-and-desist notice along with an application and links to our ordinances. That letter has only recently been approved by counsel and will be going out soon.”

78. Pathmark Inks Lease at I-Bank Tower -

A longtime third-party logistics company is on the move.

Pathmark Transportation Co., which was started in 1984 as a subsidiary of petroleum marketing company Pathmark International before becoming a national logistics provider, has signed a new lease for 3,800 square feet at the i-bank Tower on Poplar Avenue in East Memphis.

79. City Official: No Blue Flu Threshold for National Guard -

The state of Tennessee has offered to direct Tennessee Highway Patrol troopers to Memphis to help fill manpower gaps as a result of the hundreds of Memphis Police officers who’ve called in sick over the last week.

80. Grizzlies Renew Commitment to Raise $2.5 Million for St. Jude -

The Memphis Grizzlies have announced that they have committed to raising $2.5 million over 10 years to continue helping St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in the research and treatment of childhood cancer and other deadly diseases.

81. Grizz Renew Commitment to St. Jude -

The Memphis Grizzlies have announced that they have committed to raising $2.5 million over 10 years to continue helping St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in the research and treatment of childhood cancer and other deadly diseases.

82. Atkinson Joins Dermaflage Team -

Michael Graber asked that I write this week’s column to both announce my move to join the leadership team at our Ventures company, Silicone Arts Labs, and to reflect on the last seven years at Southern Growth Studio. We announce my departure from the Studio with a great sense of pride and accomplishment, as it is one of the ways we are meeting our mission and making a positive impact in Memphis.

83. Graceland May Remove Presley's Old Airplanes -

MEMPHIS (AP) — For 30 years, tourists from around the world have paid money to get a look at two airplanes once owned by Elvis Presley at Graceland in Memphis. Fans enjoy touring the planes for their direct connection to Presley and his jet-setting lifestyle, a sort of touchstone to the life of the King of Rock and Roll and his family.

84. University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Le Bonheur Form Pediatric Obesity Center -

Doctors like to go where they are needed.

Dr. Joan C. Han is coming to Memphis to be the founding director of the new UT-Le Bonheur Pediatric Obesity Center and to direct the new Le Bonheur Healthy Lifestyle Clinic.

85. Rain Stops, Flood Waters Remain -

Once the rain stopped Sunday, June 29, the National Weather Service at Memphis had recorded seven inches of rain in a 30-hour period. That’s about three and a half inches more rain than Memphis gets on average in the month of June.

86. BuzzFree Mosquito Keeps Properties Free of Pests -

Lisa Thomas was well-aware of how relentless the mosquitoes could be. For several years, her family lived in the Mississippi Delta.

87. The View From Nashville -

IF WE DON’T CARE, NO ONE ELSE WILL. Longtime friend and Nashville marketing maven, David Bohan, answered my column about oxymoronic Nashville barbecue with his own column “Marketing Matters” in The Tennessean last week.

88. Landing Zone -

Beale Street Landing was supposed to cost far less than $43 million and be completed much sooner than the decade it took from the design competition.

But the head of the Riverfront Development Corp. overseeing the 6-acre landing and its construction says with the formal two-day opening of the landing starting Friday, June 27, the riverfront project at the foot of Beale Street and on the northern edge of Tom Lee Park should begin to counter critics of how the project has been managed.

89. Civil Rights Museum Sit-In Exhibit Goes Digital -

Raumesh Akbari remembers her first encounter with the sit-in exhibit at the National Civil Rights Museum.

As a sixth-grader, she had heard and read about the lunch counter sit-ins of the early 1960s. But like many visitors to the museum, she was too young to have encountered them herself.

90. Fat Chance -

12-STOP. “My name is Dan, and I’ve lost control.”

“Hi, Dan,” answers America, desperately addicted to too much, too often, in need of a 12-stop consumption program. As in 12 ounces of any soft drink is plenty and 12 ounces of gin starts fights with strangers. As in 12 ounces of any animal in any form is too much and 12 things on your breakfast plate doesn’t jumpstart your day, just your LDL. As in 12 of anything larger than a carrot stick at a single sitting will narrow arteries and prospects, broaden what you’re sitting on, and make getting up from the table – or for anything – a challenge. For a forklift.

91. Back on Track -

Two major Downtown projects that suffered setbacks after the real estate market seized up when the recession battered the economy are poised for a comeback.

Real estate experts and Downtown officials say the prospects for the Horizon on the southern end of Downtown and One Beale at Beale Street and Riverside Drive appear promising.

92. EDGE Mulls Tax Break for Plastics Recycling Co. -

A company that recycles and manufactures post-industrial plastics is considering relocating from Arkansas to Memphis.

RE-CY, or RE-CY Plastics, is considering acquiring a facility on Winchester Road to recycle and manufacture plastics, which are then used for automotive parts, decking and IKEA furniture.

93. Trolley Hiatus Comes at Critical Time for MATA -

The decision by the Memphis Area Transit Authority to temporarily stop all trolley service comes at a time of broader change for the city’s mass transit system.

The Main Street Trolley line that opened in the early 1990s and brought trolleys back in service for the first time in decades is getting its first comprehensive maintenance since the opening 22 years ago.

94. Coalition Vows Push for Minority Business Gains -

For decades, goals and percentages have been set for minority business participation in city and county governments.

Both governments have compliance offices. Elected officials look at percentages and ask questions about participation on particular projects.

95. Yearlong Party -

It’s perhaps fitting that the Germantown Performing Arts Center celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with Paul Chandler as its executive director, a job he’s had for almost two years now.

96. Commission Discusses School Board Raises -

After a five-month delay, Shelby County Commissioners resumed action Monday, June 2, on an ordinance that would raise the pay of Shelby County Schools board members.

Commissioners approved Monday on the second of three readings an amended pay raise for school board members.

97. Game Changer -

One educator’s reform is another educator’s wrong move.

Dorsey Hopson doesn’t use the word “reform” as often as he uses the term “game changer.”

But the superintendent of Shelby County Schools has himself become a game changer as the school board that signed him to a three-year contract last September weighs a further extension of his three-year contract that for now runs through September 2016.

98. Local Connection -

When The Chinese Connection Dub Embassy takes the stage in Handy Park on Beale Street Friday, June 6, the band’s reggae beat and style will be something new for a park that has seen everything from church choirs to jug bands to blues bands playing “Mustang Sally” and similar hits for tourists.

99. County Commission Discusses School Board Raises -

After a five-month delay, Shelby County Commissioners resumed action Monday, June 2, on an ordinance that would raise the pay of Shelby County Schools board members.

Commissioners approved Monday on the second of three readings an amended pay raise for school board members.

100. Commission Approves Budgets and Dueling Tax Rates Without PreK Amendment -

Shelby County Commissioners signed off Monday, June 2, on a $1.1 billion consolidated operating budget for all of Shelby County government as well as a $75 million capital budget, both for the fiscal year that begins July 1.