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Editorial Results (free)

1. This week in Memphis history: November 28-December 4 -

2006: Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton and former heavyweight boxing champion Joe Frazier boxed at the Peabody Hotel in an exhibition for the Shelby County Drug Court.

2. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

3. Lowery Named 2015 City Council Chairman -

The longest-serving member of the Memphis City Council will be the 2015 chairman of the 13-member body.

Myron Lowery was elected by the council unanimously and without opposition Tuesday, Nov. 18. He succeeds Jim Strickland in the chairman’s position.

4. Wharton Defends Record, ‘Tough’ Decisions -

When he ran for Memphis mayor in the 2009 special election, A C Wharton Jr. said he was running to win, but also to change the nature of the city’s politics.

“This is what hurts us in politics today,” Wharton said five years later during the first fundraiser Monday, Nov. 17, in his campaign for re-election to a second full four-year term as mayor. “Everybody wants to stand up and say how is this going to go over. And if it doesn’t look like it’s going to go over well, they back down.”

5. Wharton Begins Re-Election Fundraising -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. told a group of supporters Monday, Nov. 17, at his first re-election fundraiser that he is running to win and in the race for a second full term to stay.

Wharton estimated he drew a group of 300 supporters to the fundraiser at the Memphis Botanic Gardens with some leaving early to attend a Grizzlies basketball game Downtown.

6. Wharton: Re-Election Campaign is Definite -

In an email to potential supporters this week, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says his re-election plans are definite and he is "running to win."

The email comes after Wharton's campaign sent out invitations late last month to a Nov. 17 fundraiser at the Memphis Botanic Garden.

7. Wharton: Re-Election Campaign is Definite -

In an email to potential supporters this week, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says his re-election plans are definite and he is "running to win."

The email comes after Wharton's campaign sent out invitations late last month to a Nov. 17 fundraiser at the Memphis Botanic Garden.

8. Wharton: 'Running to Win' -

In an email to potential supporters this week, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says his re-election plans are definite and he is "running to win."

The email comes after Wharton's campaign sent out invitations late last month to a Nov. 17 fundraiser at the Memphis Botanic Garden.

9. ‘State of Black Memphis’ Forum Urges Action -

Each year, the Urban League releases a national report that puts the “state of Black America” in the form of statistics on health care, education, economic power and similar factors.

This year, the Memphis Urban League Young Professionals used the report’s release to start a discussion billed as the “state of Black Memphis.”

10. This week in Memphis history: October 24-30 -

2009: Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton said he had received a “target” letter from federal prosecutors indicating he was the target of a federal investigation into an option he had on the land where the Greyhound bus terminal then stood. Ultimately the investigation went nowhere.

11. City Hall Opens Enrollment on Changing Health Plan -

City of Memphis employees just emerged from the open enrollment period for the still-evolving changes in health insurance benefits for 2015. And city retirees are about to enter their open enrollment period for the same benefits plans that take effect in January.

12. Retirees, City Attorneys Spar Over Lifetime Subsidies -

The move by city retirees to block the end of a 70-percent subsidy of their health insurance premiums by the city of Memphis drew heavy fire Monday, Oct. 6, in Shelby County Chancery Court.

Several retirees testified before Chancellor Walter Evans that they were promised the subsidies for the rest of their lives when they were hired by city government.

13. Collins Taps Frustration in Possible Mayoral Challenge -

Memphis City Council member Harold Collins took his exploratory campaign for Memphis Mayor to the Evergreen Historic District just days after launching the effort on social media.

14. Evans Hears Arguments Over City Health Insurance Benefits -

Chancellor Walter Evans won’t rule until later this month on a move by city retirees to at least temporarily halt the city’s plan to end a 70 percent subsidy of health insurance premiums for city retirees.

15. Old School, New Day -

Vasco Smith remembers working the polls at Fairview Junior High School in the 1960s as a child. His job was simple – to hand out campaign literature and not stray within the 100-foot limit by law between poll workers and the polling place in the gymnasium.

16. Nine Losing Candidates Challenge August Vote -

Nine losing candidates from the August elections are contesting the results in a Shelby County Chancery Court lawsuit.

The lawsuit was filed Sept. 2 by Democratic candidates Joe Brown, Henri Brooks and Wanda Halbert; judicial candidates Mozella Ross, Kim Sims, Kenya Brooks, J. Nathan Toney and Alicia Howard; and Doris Deberry-Bradshaw, who ran in a state House Democratic primary.

17. Hopson Restructures School System Management -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson has eliminated the school system’s set of four regional superintendents and replaced them with three associate superintendents in what he said is a change to move the school system’s central office closer to the daily operation of schools.

18. Cohen, Wilkins Feud Over Endorsements -

Candidates and political strategists who advise those candidates have a complex relationship with endorsements.

They have a value in building momentum for a campaign and in the case of organizations, they usually come with a check or in-kind contribution. But in and of themselves -- especially in a long list – their value in terms of influence has its limits.

19. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

20. Riverfront Cornerstone -

Beale Street Landing seems an unlikely choice as a cornerstone, considering its troubled path to completion.

At this point, it’s almost a motto – not on time and over budget, and by a lot on both counts.

21. Landing Zone -

Beale Street Landing was supposed to cost far less than $43 million and be completed much sooner than the decade it took from the design competition.

But the head of the Riverfront Development Corp. overseeing the 6-acre landing and its construction says with the formal two-day opening of the landing starting Friday, June 27, the riverfront project at the foot of Beale Street and on the northern edge of Tom Lee Park should begin to counter critics of how the project has been managed.

22. Cohen Touts Ability to Represent District -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen told political supporters over the weekend that he expects the 9th Congressional district Democratic primary race with attorney Ricky E. Wilkins to involve a lot of mud slinging.

23. Out With the Old -

A small group of people gathered last week in the front room of a new Southwest Memphis housing development for senior citizens.

The scene marked the ending of one era in public housing and the start of another as the doors opened to the newest facility in the nearly 20-year makeover of public housing.

24. Wilkins Maps Different Challenge of Cohen -

Ricky Wilkins is promising to match U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen’s energy level and be more of a presence in the district than Cohen if he upsets the incumbent in the August Democratic primary for the 9th Congressional District.

25. City Council Weighs Police Dollars, Oversight -

The Memphis City Council on Tuesday, May 6, got its first detailed look at the Memphis Police Department’s budget proposal, which was followed by the council starting the process of bringing back to life the Police Civilian Review Board. That would begin with a series of community meetings and recommendations from a citizens group in August.

26. No Annexation Declaration Directs New Path -

In seven words last week, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. got the attention of hundreds of planners who gathered in the city for the “Memphis Boot Camp,” a summit of sorts toward the idea of changing the city’s philosophy and approach to community development and economic development.

27. Ongoing Rape Kit Backlog Fallout Expands -

The ongoing fallout from the backlog of untested rape kits is beginning to develop some boundaries and dividing lines as it moves into federal court and expands outside court to include a backlog of 300 rape kits by the Shelby County Sheriff’s Department.

28. Museum Milestone -

When the National Civil Rights Museum formally reopens Saturday, April 5, it will be with the “breaking” of a ceremonial chain at the new entrance to the building that was once the Lorraine Motel, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968.

29. Heritage Trail Likely to Continue Despite Rejection -

The plan to demolish the last large public housing development in Memphis and use the demolition as a catalyst for a larger redevelopment of the surrounding area did not make the final cut with federal housing officials in Washington.

30. Hilton Garden Inn Planned for Former Bus Station -

A Knoxville-based hospitality company has closed on the purchase of the vacant Greyhound facility Downtown and will transform the property into a Hilton Garden Inn.

Turkey Creek Hospitality completed the $1.7 million purchase of the 1.3-acre property Tuesday, March 18, and will bring a 140-room Hilton Garden Inn to the heart of Downtown Memphis. Hank Martin and Elliot Embry with NAI Saig Co. represented Greyhound Lines Inc. in the transaction.

31. Wharton Pitches ‘Bookend’ Convention Complex -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. calls it the “bookend approach.”

It’s a phrase his administration has used before to talk about linking The Pyramid end of the riverfront with the Beale Street end.

32. Council Looks to Pinpoint Pension Numbers -

The Tuesday, March 4, discussion Memphis City Council members had with Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson, Tennessee Treasurer David Lillard and consultants from four actuarial firms centered on the city’s pension liability.

33. Tour Shows Work Progressing in Pyramid -

The opening date for Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid is still tentative.

But it appears to now be in December depending on who you talked with this week as the outdoors retailer offered a look inside The Pyramid.

34. Three Town Center Concepts Take Shape -

The city of Memphis would move government offices into two shopping malls and the Soulsville Town Center under tentative “conceptual” plans Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. took Tuesday, Feb. 18, to the Memphis City Council.

35. Southbrook Mall Plan Headed to City Council -

What began as a plan last year for $1.5 million in city funding to fix the roof and make other repairs at Whitehaven’s Southbrook Mall has now become a larger and probably more expensive plan for development in a broad area of Whitehaven.

36. Beale Alterations Point to Possible Larger Changes -

As a brass band leading a lunch-hour parade on Beale Street last Friday passed Handy Park, a crew wearing the district’s new uniforms for maintenance workers were taking down the Performa Entertainment sign outlining the ground rules for the park area.

37. City Council Reviews Raleigh Springs Mall Plan -

Memphis City Council members get their first public detailed look Tuesday, Feb. 4, of an “urban renewal” plan for the Raleigh Springs Mall.

The council meets at 3:30 p.m. at City Hall, 125 N. Main St. Follow the meeting @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols.

38. Tennessee Democrats Struggle With New, Old Factions -

Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Roy Herron realizes the party faithful in Memphis see some challenges in keeping the faith these days.

39. Events -

The Daily News and In-Synk will host a Leadership Lunch and Learn discussing Marcus Buckingham’s book “The One Thing You Need to Know” Friday, Jan. 17, from 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. in the Triumph Bank boardroom, 5699 Poplar Ave. Tickets are $20. Visit lnltheonething.eventbrite.com.

40. Events -

The Daily News and In-Synk will host a Leadership Lunch and Learn discussing Marcus Buckingham’s book “The One Thing You Need to Know” Friday, Jan. 17, from 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. at Triumph Bank, 5699 Poplar Ave. Attendees do not have to read the book to attend. Tickets are $20. Visit lnltheonething.eventbrite.com.

41. City, County Differ on Fairgrounds Zone -

The city of Memphis and Shelby County governments have a difference of opinion about tax revenue and education funding.

It is over where the sales tax revenue would go within a tourism development zone the city wants to use to finance the redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

42. Bad Blood -

December was already going to be a busy month at City Hall for the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

He would be bringing a plan to provide $15 million in city financing for the $180 million Crosstown revitalization project and rolling out its fix to address the Tennessee Comptroller’s vocal concerns about the city’s unfunded pension liability.

43. Mid-South Fair Leaders Seek Memphis Return -

The president of the Mid-South Fair says the nonprofit organization wants to return to Memphis.

“We were told to leave our home,” Michael Doyle, president of the fair, told Memphis City Council members of the fair’s departure as Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton made fifth-term plans for a renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds that originally included a new Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium.

44. Mid-South Fair Leaders Seek Memphis Return -

The president of the Mid-South Fair told Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Nov. 19, that the nonprofit organization wants to return to Memphis.

“We were told to leave our home,” Michael Doyle, president of the fair, told council members of the fair’s departure as Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton made plans for a renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds that originally included a new Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium.

45. Lead Local -

The T-shirt is plain and black with a simple logo that reads “Eat Local,” and if you see someone wearing it, the chances are pretty good they work at a locally owned restaurant.

In recent years there has been a “Buy Local” campaign among some business leaders that’s been hard to miss. Less conspicuous but still easy to find is evidence of perhaps a more influential trend – how the city is moving toward what might be called a “Lead Local” preference based on some recent changes in leadership of some of the city’s most important institutions.

46. Current Elections Merge With Future Campaigns -

The campaigns for elections in 2013 are beginning to overlap with campaigns on the ballot in 2014.

The set of 11 elections in three months ends with the Nov. 21 special general election for state House District 91 and a citywide referendum on a half percent sales tax hike.

47. Lipscomb: Fairgrounds Retail to be ‘Market Driven’ -

Robert Lipscomb, director of the city of Memphis’ Division of Housing & Community Development, says the retail to be part of the city’s Fairgrounds overhaul will not be in competition with businesses in the nearby Cooper-Young Historic District or Overton Square.

48. Democrats ‘Roast’ Herenton, Look Ahead to 2014 -

Divisions within the local Democratic party took a backseat over the weekend as the Shelby County Democratic Party held the first of two large fundraisers for the 2014 election year.

But the look back for the party came with some advice for the future.

49. Tax Zone Would Fund Fairgrounds Remake -

A 3-square-mile Tourism Development Zone would finance a $233 million renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds sought by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

The city sent its 88-page application Sept. 13 to Tennessee Finance Commissioner Larry B. Martin. The application seeks state permission to use incremental sales tax revenue estimated at close to $12 million a year starting in 2016 to pay off the bonds to finance a project whose price tag is just below the $250 million FedExForum.

50. School Changes to Continue Beyond Labor Day -

At the start of the fourth week of the school year for the unified countywide school system, interim superintendent Dorsey Hopson and Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong talked directly about school security for the first time.

51. Memphis Police, School System Rift Not First One -

It took three weeks into the unified school system’s first school year for Memphis Police to get a memo that they were to respond to calls at Shelby County Schools within the city of Memphis.

The information bulletin from Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong went out to all officers Thursday, Aug. 22, the same day that a 5-year-old kindergarten student at Westside Elementary School walked into the Frayser school with a gun in his backpack and the gun went off in the backpack.

52. August 23-August 29, 2013: This week in Memphis history -

2012: Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell vetoed a referendum on a half-cent countywide sales tax hike and the Shelby County Commission overrode the veto putting the item to voters in the city of Memphis and the unincorporated county on the Nov. 6 ballot. Voters defeated the sales tax hike.

53. Northside School for Detained Juveniles Opens -

The charter school that opened for class Thursday, Aug. 15, in North Memphis is unique for several reasons.

A total of 130 children, all of them in the custody of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, are assigned to Thurgood Marshall High School of Career Development. Of that number, 86 had registered on the first day of classes at the school within a school at Northside High School.

54. Magevney House to Reopen in September -

Eight years after it was closed to the public by the city of Memphis, the Magevney House will reopen Sept. 7.

The limited opening of the historic home at 198 Adams Ave., part of the city’s museum system, will be from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on the first Saturday of each month. Tours of the house and garden will take about 40 minutes.

55. Magevney House Reopens in September -

Eight years after it was closed to the public by the city of Memphis, the Magevney House will reopen Sept. 7.

The limited opening of the historic home at 198 Adams Ave., part of the city’s museum system, will be from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on the first Saturday of each month. Tours of the house and garden will take about 40 minutes.

56. Humes Remembers Past, Reflects Future -

Elvis Presley’s alma mater is a very different place these days. But then again, so is the structure of public education in Memphis.

For starters, Humes High School has been a middle school for some time.

57. Democrats Plan Herenton Roast -

Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton will be the guest of honor at a Shelby County Democratic Party roast.

The roast on Sept. 28 at Colonial Country Club will be a fundraiser for the local party going into the 2014 Shelby County elections.

58. Historic School Year Opening Has Familiar Look -

Germantown High School principal Ted Horrell warned a busload of school board members, staff and interim superintendent Dorsey Hopson that they were about to see some confusion on his campus.

On the opening day of the first school year for the unified school system Monday, Aug. 5, Horrell stopped the group just outside the school’s cafeteria, which was in its third of four lunch periods of the school day.

59. School Opening Goes Smoothly With A Few Bumps -

Missed buses and late buses as well as late registration were an expected part of opening day of the consolidated school district.

And the problems arrived just as expected Monday, Aug. 5, but not in large enough numbers to cause any major disruptions on the opening day.

60. School Board Bans Corporal Punishment -

Less than a week from the start of the first year of the consolidated school district, countywide school board members Tuesday, July 30, approved a series of policy decisions that reconcile differences between the old Memphis City Schools and Shelby County Schools systems.

61. School Board Bans Corporal Punishment -

Less than a week from the start of the first year of the consolidated school district, countywide school board members Tuesday, July 30, approved a series of policy decisions that reconcile differences between the old Memphis City Schools and Shelby County Schools systems.

62. School Board Bans Corporal Punishment, Pushes State Legislation on City Funding -

Less than a week from the start of the first year of the consolidated school district, countywide school board members Tuesday, July 30, approved a series of policy decisions that reconcile differences between the old Memphis City Schools and Shelby County Schools systems.

63. July 26-August 1, 2013: This week in Memphis history -

2009: Willie Herenton’s resignation as mayor took effect and Memphis City Council chairman Myron Lowery became mayor.

64. Plans Call for Fairview to Become Optional School -

Fairview Middle School would close after the upcoming school year and be repurposed as an optional school that nearby Peabody Elementary School feeds into under a proposal the countywide school board will consider next week.

65. City Budget Debate Shifts to Larger Issues -

When city leaders gathered last week for the groundbreaking of renovation work on the James Lee House in Victorian Village, the talk among them was bound to turn to the city budget season’s recent end.

66. Council to Take Final Votes on Budget -

The most critical vote at last week’s budget-dominated Memphis City Council meeting may have been the vote to adjourn leaving final budget decisions pending.

It left a week for all sides in the ongoing budget drama at City Hall a wealth of time by political standards to build support for their respective positions.

67. Five Years in the Life -

Delta Airlines and Northwest Airlines has just merged with more than 150 flights a day at Memphis International Airport shifting to the Delta brand. And Delta’s CEO, Richard Anderson, said Memphis would be an integral hub with more traffic.

68. Chism Pushing for Younger Democratic Contenders -

Candidates in the 2014 elections for Shelby County Commission emerged at Commissioner Sidney Chism’s political picnic over the weekend.

69. Hopson Proposes Closing 11 Schools In 2014-2015 -

Memphis-Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson is proposing the countywide school board close 11 more schools, 10 in the city of Memphis and one in Millington.

The closings which include three Memphis high schools – Northside, Carver and Westwood – would take effect in the 2014-2015 school year if approved by the school board.

70. Humes Optional School Scrubbed by Schools Board -

Plans for an optional school at Humes Middle School in the new school year were called off Tuesday, March 19, by the countywide school board.

Bravo Academy was to be an optional school for the musical arts with Humes closed as a conventional school by the school system.

71. Aitken Buyout Approved -

The contract of Shelby County Schools superintendent John Aitken has been bought out by the countywide school board at Aitken’s request. And it takes effect immediately.

The board decision came after a closed session with the board’s attorneys for nearly an hour Tuesday, March 19.

72. School Board To Consider Reversing Course On Humes -

Countywide school board members meeting in special session Tuesday, March 19, will consider a recommendation to change or alter plans for an optional school for the musical arts at Humes Middle School and instead turn the school over to the state-led Achievement School District.

73. Johnican Practiced Political Art of Coalition -

Minerva Johnican practiced the art of the coalition in a political career that spanned more than 40 years.

The former Shelby County Commissioner, Memphis City Council member and Criminal Court Clerk Minerva died Friday, March 8, at Methodist University Hospital at the age of 74.

74. Sales Tax Hike Headed to Ballot -

Memphis City Council members take final votes Tuesday, March 5, on a half-percent city sales tax hike referendum and the use of the estimated $47 million in revenue the tax hike will produce.

The council, which meets at 3:30 p.m. at City Hall, 125 N. Main St., is expected to pass the referendum and send it to voters this year.

75. Late Judge Higgs Changed Local Politics -

Funeral services for Shelby County Criminal Court Judge and Memphis mayoral contender Otis Higgs were pending and being planned Monday, Feb. 18, just days after his unexpected death.

76. Council to Hear Fairgrounds Update -

Memphis City Council members get a look Tuesday, Feb. 19, at the latest plan for renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

The city administration presents its plan at the 1:45 p.m. council executive session.

77. Judge and Mayoral Contender Otis Higgs Dies -

Shelby County Criminal Court Judge W. Otis Higgs, whose two bids to become Memphis Mayor in the 1970s were important chapters in the city’s political and racial history, died Friday, Feb. 15, at the age of 75.

78. Reardon Cautions Downtowners About Heritage Trail -

The University of Memphis professor spearheading the opposition of demolishing the city’s last remaining public housing project in the Vance Avenue neighborhood says that while the Heritage Trail Community Redevelopment Plan appears to be on “indefinite hold,” it is not dead, and Downtowners should beware.

79. Beale Bankruptcy Terms Nearly Done -

A federal bankruptcy court judge has adopted a settlement on the bankruptcy case involving control of the Beale Street Entertainment District.

But all sides in the legal action will be reading the fine print of the coming written court order carefully as one part of the long-running legal drama over the storied district nears an end.

80. Final Bell -

From the moment he became Memphis City Schools superintendent, Kriner Cash had competition.

“I’ve been fighting since I got here,” he said in the early stages of what winds up as a five-year tenure that officially comes to an end July 31.

81. Conrad, Flinn Pitch Cost-Saving Measures for City -

Memphis City Council member Kemp Conrad wants to explore selling city assets, including Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division, and using the proceeds to establish a trust fund for early childhood education and other “wrap around” social services.

82. Schools Security Plan Emphasizes Consistency -

While many of the most controversial issues of the coming merger of Memphis City Schools and Shelby County Schools are still to be decided, the issue of how to handle school security appears to be settled.

83. Wharton Talks New Convention Center -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. said 2013 will be the year his administration reopens discussions about a new convention center.

Wharton’s open question about how to compete for convention and meeting business comes five years to the month that his predecessor as mayor, Willie Herenton, talked of building a new convention center or expanding the existing one, which underwent a major renovation in 2005.

84. Liberty Bowl Moves Raise Questions About Coliseum -

Memphis City Council members approved $12 million in funding Tuesday, Jan. 8, for the coming design and renovation of Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium to make it comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

85. Lowery Undecided About Future on City Council -

The longest-serving member of the Memphis City Council said New Year’s Day that he hasn’t yet decided if he will run for a final four-year term of office in the 2015 city elections or let his current term be his last, leaving office in 2015.

86. Complex Agenda -

In the first year of his first full four-year term of office as Memphis mayor, A C Wharton Jr. put his political weight behind shifting priorities at City Hall.

In that year, he attempted to broaden the police department’s anti-crime strategy beyond the Blue CRUSH brand of hot spot crime crackdowns. He moved further in his long-held quest to redefine violence – particularly gun violence – as a public health issue. And Wharton continued to meld private funding with an advancing of public funding from different pockets to move capital construction projects inside and outside of the Downtown core area in a stubborn post-recession environment.

87. Lowery Undecided About Future on City Council -

The longest-serving member of the Memphis City Council said New Year’s Day that he hasn’t yet decided if he will run for a final four-year term of office in the 2015 city elections or let his current term be his last, leaving office in 2015.

88. Turning the Page -

It’s that time of year again. It’s that time when journalists across the fruited plain collectively try and make God laugh – with our prognostications, of course, about the year ahead and of what might be.

89. Ford Jr. Ready for Ascent to City Council Chairman -

If you didn’t know that Edmund Ford Jr. teaches mathematics, there would be clues.

He can almost sense a percentage that is wrong and he prefers not to “ballpark” numbers.

The precise numbers are part of the story of his entry into politics.

90. Heritage Trail Complexity a Concern -

As 2012 comes to an end, the most ambitious plan from City Hall for the revitalization of an inner-city area in 15 years of such projects has hit a critical stage.

The idea of a tax increment financing zone for a large swath of the area south of FedExForum as well as the Downtown area itself into South Memphis is being examined closely by Shelby County Commissioners before they commit county property tax revenues with the “Heritage Trail” zone.

91. Council Approves Property Tax Collection Merger -

Timing did what decades of offers and counter-offers couldn’t do when it came to changing who collects current and delinquent property taxes for Memphis.

The City Council approved Tuesday, Dec. 18, an interlocal agreement for Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir to collect property taxes for the city.

92. Council to Review $12 Million Stadium ADA Plan -

Memphis City Council members get their first look Tuesday, Dec. 18, at the plan to pay for improvements at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium to settle the city’s negotiations with the U.S. Justice Department over making the stadium comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

93. Reardon Speaks Out Against City’s Approach to Housing -

The University of Memphis professor leading the resistance to a still-forming plan to demolish the city’s last large public housing project says the city’s approach to transforming public housing since the late 1990s hasn’t worked.

94. Heritage Trails Financing Draws Concern -

The next stop for an ambitious 20-year redevelopment plan that stretches from the South Downtown area into South Memphis is a Dec. 6 meeting of the Memphis and Shelby County Community Redevelopment Agency.

95. Judge’s Ruling Moves Beale’s Future Forward -

For at least a year, a box containing copies of a report on the future of Beale Street has been in storage awaiting a settlement of the two levels of court disputes for control of the entertainment district.

96. Vance Plan Could Move to Land Use Control Board -

Memphis City Council members recommended Tuesday, Oct. 16, sending a plan to the Land Use Control Board that calls for the revitalization of the Vance Avenue area and leaves the Foote Homes public housing development intact.

97. Armstrong Talks About Start to Police Tenure -

Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong counted it as a good weekend this month when a guns for gas program drew a larger crowd than expected and a haul of 500 guns when he and organizers had expected maybe 200 at the most.

98. Herenton Home Moves in Short Sale -

The home of former Memphis Mayor Willie W. Herenton in Banneker Estates’ gated community has traded hands for $350,000 in a short sale.

The single-family home at 5281 Horn Lake Road in the McKellar-Whitehaven-Levi PD neighborhood was sold to Tamara G. Washington on Aug. 27, according to the Shelby County Register of Deeds. Washington also filed a $150,000 mortgage with Community Mortgage Corp. that matures in September 2032.

99. Herenton’s Hands to be ‘All Over’ Charter School Project -

A memorandum of understanding is still to come. And there are the details of curriculum not to mention funding and a budget.

But former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton will open the first of what he plans to be several charter schools in August, probably at Northside High School, for children in grades 6-12 who are in Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court custody.

100. Vance Collaborative to Unveil Plan -

When the Vance Avenue Collaborative unveils its five-year, six-project plan Thursday, Sept. 13, for revitalizing the area south of FedExForum there will be some differences from what Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration has been thinking.