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Editorial Results (free)

1. Memphis Finalist for Choice Neighborhoods Grant -

Memphis is among the finalists for a federal grant worth up to $30 million that would fund the demolition and redevelopment of Foote Homes, the city’s last large public housing development.

The city got word Tuesday, July 14, from U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen that it is one of nine cities competing for the Choice Neighborhoods grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

2. Memphis Campaigns Shift to Strategy -

With more than a dozen contenders in the race for Memphis mayor, incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was asked Wednesday, July 15, his strategy for such a large field of challengers.

“This is small to what it’s been before,” Wharton said of the still-forming field of 14.

3. Wharton Issues Feisty Challenge to Mayoral Rivals -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. filed for re-election Wednesday, July 15, and taunted his challengers the day before the upcoming election’s filing deadline.

Wharton’s filing with several dozen supporters and family members on hand at the Shelby County Election Commission completes the expected field for the mayor’s race.

4. Memphis Finalist for Federal Choice Neighborhoods Grant -

The city of Memphis is among the finalists for a federal grant worth up to $30 million that would fund the demolition and redevelopment of Foote Homes, the city’s last large public housing development.

5. Strickland Files for Mayor One Week From Deadline -

A week before the filing deadline for candidates on Memphis’ October ballot, city councilman Jim Strickland filed his qualifying petition for mayor and said he has a campaign war chest of approximately $400,000.

6. Memphis' Cost for Non-Pension Benefits Still Controversial -

The amounts are roughly the same at about $1 billion, but there’s a difference between City Hall’s liability for pension and non-pension benefits, including health insurance, for city of Memphis employees.

7. Memphis Finance Gurus Retrace City’s Fiscal Path -

Mayors come and go at City Hall and what was a priority for one administration can change with the next. But one constant is finance.

It defines a city’s overall health, no matter who is in office, and thus its ability to borrow money to fund those priorities and then pay off that debt.

8. Chism Political Picnic Offers Pre-Campaign Snapshot -

Memphis mayoral contender Jim Strickland saw a face he didn’t recognize Saturday, June 13, in the southwest Memphis crowd at former County Commissioner Sidney Chism’s annual political picnic.

9. Memphis Gets Greenlight to Relocate Police -

Now it’s all about closing the deal.

With no debate or discussion, the Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, May 19, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s proposal to buy the 13-story Donnelley J. Hill state office building at 170 N. Main St., just a stone’s throw from City Hall.

10. Pyramid Promises -

It took about 25 years for an elevator ride to reach the top of The Pyramid.

That’s how long several generations of political leaders – three county mayors and three Memphis mayors as well as a changing group of city council members over seven elections – have been seeking a Pyramid with a ride to the apex.

11. Tumult of 1968 Leaves Indelible Mark on Memphis’ Legal, Political Figures -

When attorney David Caywood thinks about the pivotal events of the 1968 sanitation workers strike in Memphis, there is usually a big “what if” moment.

12. Heritage Trail Redevelopment Plan Resurfaces -

A long-delayed city plan to remake a large swath of Downtown’s southern end appears to be making a comeback.

Memphis Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb said Tuesday that the city expects to receive good news on the Heritage Trail development plan sometime this year.

13. Editorial: Memphis Elections About More Than Candidates -

When A C Wharton Jr. was elected Memphis mayor in 2009 from a record-setting field of 25 candidates, it was – among other things – a reaction to 17 years of Willie Herenton.

No one in the city’s history has served as mayor longer than Herenton.

14. Wharton's Way -

City elections in Memphis begin unadorned.

Yard signs don’t bloom until mid- to late summer, when the strategic use of television ads and the much higher cycle of radio advertising kick in.

15. Foote Homes Targeted by Federal Jobs Training Grant -

With a HUD official in town last week bearing word of a $3 million job training grant for public housing residents, city leaders remained focused on what Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. calls “the big one.”

16. Lowery Won’t Seek Re-Election -

Memphis City Council chairman Myron Lowery, the longest-serving member of the council, won’t be running for re-election on the October ballot.

17. Sammons to Become Memphis CAO -

Incoming city chief administrative officer Jack Sammons should arrive at City Hall on May 8, just a few days after Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. presents his budget propsosal to the Memphis City Council.

18. Sammons Picks CAO Job -

Former Memphis City Council member Jack Sammons is going back to City Hall and giving up his position as chairman of the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority board.

19. Editorial: Leaders Should Talk Less, Act More to Move Memphis Forward -

Leadership is a balance and in many cases the balance means taking a risk by acting and creating something with the knowledge that most citizens will know what they want when they see it.

That also means they will know what they don’t want when they see it.

20. Morris Talks of ‘Opportunity Cost’ -

The president of the Downtown Memphis Commission says it is a mistake for Memphis leaders to try to match Nashville’s new convention center and massive convention centers being built in other cities.

21. Sammons 'Very Interested' in Wharton's Chief Administrator Job -

The Memphis City Council and the chief administrative officer both have offices in City Hall.

But to Jack Sammons, who served on the council for more than 20 years and was Chief Administrative Officer for eight months, there is no contest over which job is better.

22. Restless Winter -

For most of its 103-year life as city property, the Mid-South Fairgrounds has been a place where Memphians remember why they came there in the past, as local leaders have periodically pushed to remake its landscape and in turn create more memories going forward.

23. Wharton Still Mum on Extent of Shake-Up -

The move of Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority Board chairman and former Memphis City Council member Jack Sammons back to City Hall is not a done deal just yet.

24. Wharton's City Hall Shake-Up Has Ripples -

The political timing of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton’s shake-up of his leadership team could have been worse – closer to the October city elections in which he is seeking a second full term.

25. Wharton Eyes City Hall Shake-Up -

Facing specific criticism from political challengers that his administration is disorganized and hasn’t focused on priorities much past initial press conferences, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. acted this week to shake up his office starting at the top.

26. Attorneys Recall Role of Law in Events of 1968 -

David Caywood still remembers the memorandum of understanding that almost settled the 1968 sanitation workers strike before Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination.

27. Raleigh Springs Mall Tests Town Center Concept -

The idea that a declining shopping mall can be redeveloped and reinvigorated as a “town center” with local government offices as a catalyst for private developers appears to be on its way to a meeting with reality.

28. Alternative Ending -

The city of Memphis secured $6.7 million in federal funding last week to improve and rehab public housing.

Meanwhile, the city’s application for a much larger federal grant to demolish the city’s last large public housing development was making the rounds at the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.

29. Justin Ford: ‘We’re On The Cusp Of Change’ -

Shelby County commission chairman Justin Ford is running for Memphis Mayor in 2015.

Ford announced his intention to challenge Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. Monday, Feb. 9, joining former county commissioner James Harvey, city council member Jim Strickland, and former University of Memphis basketball player Detric Golden in the growing field.

30. Wharton Not Giving Up on Fairgrounds Plan -

Nashville is a more turbulent place than usual these days, especially Capitol Hill. So Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and his administration probably won’t tempt the turbulence there by taking their plan for a Tourism Development Zone to finance a Mid-South Fairgrounds renovation to the Tennessee Building Commission later this month.

31. Wharton, Strickland Close In Campaign Balances So Far -

Close isn’t enough when it comes to winning elections. But it works when it comes to financing the campaigns leading to the elections.

And Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and his most vocal challenger so far, City Council member Jim Strickland, posted campaign dollar amounts this week that suggest a lively campaign later in this election year.

32. Size of Mayoral Field Shadows Race -

Nobody running for election on the Oct. 8 ballot can even pull a qualifying petition to get on the ballot until April, yet February is shaping up as the month when it is determined what kind of challenge and how many challengers incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. will face.

33. Council Takes Up Beale’s Next Act -

Memphis City Council members are likely to have some questions Tuesday, Jan. 20, about the still tentative settlement of the last part of the court fight for control of Beale Street.

The tentative terms of the settlement between the city of Memphis and the Beale Street Development Corp. leaked last week and include a share of revenues from the operation of the entertainment district for the BSDC that would otherwise go to the city, which owns the property between Second and Fourth streets.

34. Strickland In Mayor's Race, Wharton Responds -

After months of speculation, Memphis City Council member Jim Strickland confirmed Thursday, Jan. 15, he is in the 2015 race for Memphis mayor.

35. Funeral Services Set for Former Police Director -

Walter Winfrey was part of a wave of Memphis Police officers who got their badges and hit the streets of Memphis in 1968.

36. Political Back Pages -

Even in the best of times, the relationship between any Memphis mayor and any group of 13 on the Memphis City Council is adversarial. That has been the intent of the structure of city government since the mayor-council form of government took effect in 1968.

37. Editorial: Finding Complexities in the Memphis Experience -

This is not your parents’ Memphis inferiority complex.

This is us having had a taste of life beyond that big hump in our identity. We’ve seen the horizon without it.

We like the view and we want to keep it.

38. Wharton Whirlwind -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. will ask the Memphis City Council to approve the approximately $30 million in city funding at the core of the settlement of the six-year-old schools funding controversy and lawsuit.

39. Editorial: Graceland Plan Ultimately Worth the Price -

The Graceland economic impact plan is a mixed bag.

But we think ultimately and clearly it is worth the investment.

The impact of just the 450-room Guest House at Graceland hotel and resort on the larger Whitehaven area is, to use an overused phrase, a game changer.

40. This week in Memphis history: November 28-December 4 -

2006: Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton and former heavyweight boxing champion Joe Frazier boxed at the Peabody Hotel in an exhibition for the Shelby County Drug Court.

41. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

42. Lowery Named 2015 City Council Chairman -

The longest-serving member of the Memphis City Council will be the 2015 chairman of the 13-member body.

Myron Lowery was elected by the council unanimously and without opposition Tuesday, Nov. 18. He succeeds Jim Strickland in the chairman’s position.

43. Wharton Defends Record, ‘Tough’ Decisions -

When he ran for Memphis mayor in the 2009 special election, A C Wharton Jr. said he was running to win, but also to change the nature of the city’s politics.

“This is what hurts us in politics today,” Wharton said five years later during the first fundraiser Monday, Nov. 17, in his campaign for re-election to a second full four-year term as mayor. “Everybody wants to stand up and say how is this going to go over. And if it doesn’t look like it’s going to go over well, they back down.”

44. Wharton Begins Re-Election Fundraising -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. told a group of supporters Monday, Nov. 17, at his first re-election fundraiser that he is running to win and in the race for a second full term to stay.

Wharton estimated he drew a group of 300 supporters to the fundraiser at the Memphis Botanic Gardens with some leaving early to attend a Grizzlies basketball game Downtown.

45. Wharton: Re-Election Campaign is Definite -

In an email to potential supporters this week, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says his re-election plans are definite and he is "running to win."

The email comes after Wharton's campaign sent out invitations late last month to a Nov. 17 fundraiser at the Memphis Botanic Garden.

46. Wharton: Re-Election Campaign is Definite -

In an email to potential supporters this week, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says his re-election plans are definite and he is "running to win."

The email comes after Wharton's campaign sent out invitations late last month to a Nov. 17 fundraiser at the Memphis Botanic Garden.

47. Wharton: 'Running to Win' -

In an email to potential supporters this week, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says his re-election plans are definite and he is "running to win."

The email comes after Wharton's campaign sent out invitations late last month to a Nov. 17 fundraiser at the Memphis Botanic Garden.

48. ‘State of Black Memphis’ Forum Urges Action -

Each year, the Urban League releases a national report that puts the “state of Black America” in the form of statistics on health care, education, economic power and similar factors.

This year, the Memphis Urban League Young Professionals used the report’s release to start a discussion billed as the “state of Black Memphis.”

49. This week in Memphis history: October 24-30 -

2009: Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton said he had received a “target” letter from federal prosecutors indicating he was the target of a federal investigation into an option he had on the land where the Greyhound bus terminal then stood. Ultimately the investigation went nowhere.

50. City Hall Opens Enrollment on Changing Health Plan -

City of Memphis employees just emerged from the open enrollment period for the still-evolving changes in health insurance benefits for 2015. And city retirees are about to enter their open enrollment period for the same benefits plans that take effect in January.

51. Retirees, City Attorneys Spar Over Lifetime Subsidies -

The move by city retirees to block the end of a 70-percent subsidy of their health insurance premiums by the city of Memphis drew heavy fire Monday, Oct. 6, in Shelby County Chancery Court.

Several retirees testified before Chancellor Walter Evans that they were promised the subsidies for the rest of their lives when they were hired by city government.

52. Collins Taps Frustration in Possible Mayoral Challenge -

Memphis City Council member Harold Collins took his exploratory campaign for Memphis Mayor to the Evergreen Historic District just days after launching the effort on social media.

53. Evans Hears Arguments Over City Health Insurance Benefits -

Chancellor Walter Evans won’t rule until later this month on a move by city retirees to at least temporarily halt the city’s plan to end a 70 percent subsidy of health insurance premiums for city retirees.

54. Old School, New Day -

Vasco Smith remembers working the polls at Fairview Junior High School in the 1960s as a child. His job was simple – to hand out campaign literature and not stray within the 100-foot limit by law between poll workers and the polling place in the gymnasium.

55. Nine Losing Candidates Challenge August Vote -

Nine losing candidates from the August elections are contesting the results in a Shelby County Chancery Court lawsuit.

The lawsuit was filed Sept. 2 by Democratic candidates Joe Brown, Henri Brooks and Wanda Halbert; judicial candidates Mozella Ross, Kim Sims, Kenya Brooks, J. Nathan Toney and Alicia Howard; and Doris Deberry-Bradshaw, who ran in a state House Democratic primary.

56. Hopson Restructures School System Management -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson has eliminated the school system’s set of four regional superintendents and replaced them with three associate superintendents in what he said is a change to move the school system’s central office closer to the daily operation of schools.

57. Cohen, Wilkins Feud Over Endorsements -

Candidates and political strategists who advise those candidates have a complex relationship with endorsements.

They have a value in building momentum for a campaign and in the case of organizations, they usually come with a check or in-kind contribution. But in and of themselves -- especially in a long list – their value in terms of influence has its limits.

58. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

59. Riverfront Cornerstone -

Beale Street Landing seems an unlikely choice as a cornerstone, considering its troubled path to completion.

At this point, it’s almost a motto – not on time and over budget, and by a lot on both counts.

60. Landing Zone -

Beale Street Landing was supposed to cost far less than $43 million and be completed much sooner than the decade it took from the design competition.

But the head of the Riverfront Development Corp. overseeing the 6-acre landing and its construction says with the formal two-day opening of the landing starting Friday, June 27, the riverfront project at the foot of Beale Street and on the northern edge of Tom Lee Park should begin to counter critics of how the project has been managed.

61. Cohen Touts Ability to Represent District -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen told political supporters over the weekend that he expects the 9th Congressional district Democratic primary race with attorney Ricky E. Wilkins to involve a lot of mud slinging.

62. Out With the Old -

A small group of people gathered last week in the front room of a new Southwest Memphis housing development for senior citizens.

The scene marked the ending of one era in public housing and the start of another as the doors opened to the newest facility in the nearly 20-year makeover of public housing.

63. Wilkins Maps Different Challenge of Cohen -

Ricky Wilkins is promising to match U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen’s energy level and be more of a presence in the district than Cohen if he upsets the incumbent in the August Democratic primary for the 9th Congressional District.

64. City Council Weighs Police Dollars, Oversight -

The Memphis City Council on Tuesday, May 6, got its first detailed look at the Memphis Police Department’s budget proposal, which was followed by the council starting the process of bringing back to life the Police Civilian Review Board. That would begin with a series of community meetings and recommendations from a citizens group in August.

65. No Annexation Declaration Directs New Path -

In seven words last week, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. got the attention of hundreds of planners who gathered in the city for the “Memphis Boot Camp,” a summit of sorts toward the idea of changing the city’s philosophy and approach to community development and economic development.

66. Ongoing Rape Kit Backlog Fallout Expands -

The ongoing fallout from the backlog of untested rape kits is beginning to develop some boundaries and dividing lines as it moves into federal court and expands outside court to include a backlog of 300 rape kits by the Shelby County Sheriff’s Department.

67. Museum Milestone -

When the National Civil Rights Museum formally reopens Saturday, April 5, it will be with the “breaking” of a ceremonial chain at the new entrance to the building that was once the Lorraine Motel, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968.

68. Heritage Trail Likely to Continue Despite Rejection -

The plan to demolish the last large public housing development in Memphis and use the demolition as a catalyst for a larger redevelopment of the surrounding area did not make the final cut with federal housing officials in Washington.

69. Hilton Garden Inn Planned for Former Bus Station -

A Knoxville-based hospitality company has closed on the purchase of the vacant Greyhound facility Downtown and will transform the property into a Hilton Garden Inn.

Turkey Creek Hospitality completed the $1.7 million purchase of the 1.3-acre property Tuesday, March 18, and will bring a 140-room Hilton Garden Inn to the heart of Downtown Memphis. Hank Martin and Elliot Embry with NAI Saig Co. represented Greyhound Lines Inc. in the transaction.

70. Wharton Pitches ‘Bookend’ Convention Complex -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. calls it the “bookend approach.”

It’s a phrase his administration has used before to talk about linking The Pyramid end of the riverfront with the Beale Street end.

71. Council Looks to Pinpoint Pension Numbers -

The Tuesday, March 4, discussion Memphis City Council members had with Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson, Tennessee Treasurer David Lillard and consultants from four actuarial firms centered on the city’s pension liability.

72. Tour Shows Work Progressing in Pyramid -

The opening date for Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid is still tentative.

But it appears to now be in December depending on who you talked with this week as the outdoors retailer offered a look inside The Pyramid.

73. Three Town Center Concepts Take Shape -

The city of Memphis would move government offices into two shopping malls and the Soulsville Town Center under tentative “conceptual” plans Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. took Tuesday, Feb. 18, to the Memphis City Council.

74. Southbrook Mall Plan Headed to City Council -

What began as a plan last year for $1.5 million in city funding to fix the roof and make other repairs at Whitehaven’s Southbrook Mall has now become a larger and probably more expensive plan for development in a broad area of Whitehaven.

75. Beale Alterations Point to Possible Larger Changes -

As a brass band leading a lunch-hour parade on Beale Street last Friday passed Handy Park, a crew wearing the district’s new uniforms for maintenance workers were taking down the Performa Entertainment sign outlining the ground rules for the park area.

76. City Council Reviews Raleigh Springs Mall Plan -

Memphis City Council members get their first public detailed look Tuesday, Feb. 4, of an “urban renewal” plan for the Raleigh Springs Mall.

The council meets at 3:30 p.m. at City Hall, 125 N. Main St. Follow the meeting @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols.

77. Tennessee Democrats Struggle With New, Old Factions -

Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Roy Herron realizes the party faithful in Memphis see some challenges in keeping the faith these days.

78. Events -

The Daily News and In-Synk will host a Leadership Lunch and Learn discussing Marcus Buckingham’s book “The One Thing You Need to Know” Friday, Jan. 17, from 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. in the Triumph Bank boardroom, 5699 Poplar Ave. Tickets are $20. Visit lnltheonething.eventbrite.com.

79. Events -

The Daily News and In-Synk will host a Leadership Lunch and Learn discussing Marcus Buckingham’s book “The One Thing You Need to Know” Friday, Jan. 17, from 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. at Triumph Bank, 5699 Poplar Ave. Attendees do not have to read the book to attend. Tickets are $20. Visit lnltheonething.eventbrite.com.

80. City, County Differ on Fairgrounds Zone -

The city of Memphis and Shelby County governments have a difference of opinion about tax revenue and education funding.

It is over where the sales tax revenue would go within a tourism development zone the city wants to use to finance the redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

81. Bad Blood -

December was already going to be a busy month at City Hall for the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

He would be bringing a plan to provide $15 million in city financing for the $180 million Crosstown revitalization project and rolling out its fix to address the Tennessee Comptroller’s vocal concerns about the city’s unfunded pension liability.

82. Mid-South Fair Leaders Seek Memphis Return -

The president of the Mid-South Fair says the nonprofit organization wants to return to Memphis.

“We were told to leave our home,” Michael Doyle, president of the fair, told Memphis City Council members of the fair’s departure as Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton made fifth-term plans for a renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds that originally included a new Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium.

83. Mid-South Fair Leaders Seek Memphis Return -

The president of the Mid-South Fair told Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Nov. 19, that the nonprofit organization wants to return to Memphis.

“We were told to leave our home,” Michael Doyle, president of the fair, told council members of the fair’s departure as Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton made plans for a renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds that originally included a new Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium.

84. Lead Local -

The T-shirt is plain and black with a simple logo that reads “Eat Local,” and if you see someone wearing it, the chances are pretty good they work at a locally owned restaurant.

In recent years there has been a “Buy Local” campaign among some business leaders that’s been hard to miss. Less conspicuous but still easy to find is evidence of perhaps a more influential trend – how the city is moving toward what might be called a “Lead Local” preference based on some recent changes in leadership of some of the city’s most important institutions.

85. Current Elections Merge With Future Campaigns -

The campaigns for elections in 2013 are beginning to overlap with campaigns on the ballot in 2014.

The set of 11 elections in three months ends with the Nov. 21 special general election for state House District 91 and a citywide referendum on a half percent sales tax hike.

86. Lipscomb: Fairgrounds Retail to be ‘Market Driven’ -

Robert Lipscomb, director of the city of Memphis’ Division of Housing & Community Development, says the retail to be part of the city’s Fairgrounds overhaul will not be in competition with businesses in the nearby Cooper-Young Historic District or Overton Square.

87. Democrats ‘Roast’ Herenton, Look Ahead to 2014 -

Divisions within the local Democratic party took a backseat over the weekend as the Shelby County Democratic Party held the first of two large fundraisers for the 2014 election year.

But the look back for the party came with some advice for the future.

88. Tax Zone Would Fund Fairgrounds Remake -

A 3-square-mile Tourism Development Zone would finance a $233 million renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds sought by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

The city sent its 88-page application Sept. 13 to Tennessee Finance Commissioner Larry B. Martin. The application seeks state permission to use incremental sales tax revenue estimated at close to $12 million a year starting in 2016 to pay off the bonds to finance a project whose price tag is just below the $250 million FedExForum.

89. School Changes to Continue Beyond Labor Day -

At the start of the fourth week of the school year for the unified countywide school system, interim superintendent Dorsey Hopson and Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong talked directly about school security for the first time.

90. Memphis Police, School System Rift Not First One -

It took three weeks into the unified school system’s first school year for Memphis Police to get a memo that they were to respond to calls at Shelby County Schools within the city of Memphis.

The information bulletin from Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong went out to all officers Thursday, Aug. 22, the same day that a 5-year-old kindergarten student at Westside Elementary School walked into the Frayser school with a gun in his backpack and the gun went off in the backpack.

91. August 23-August 29, 2013: This week in Memphis history -

2012: Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell vetoed a referendum on a half-cent countywide sales tax hike and the Shelby County Commission overrode the veto putting the item to voters in the city of Memphis and the unincorporated county on the Nov. 6 ballot. Voters defeated the sales tax hike.

92. Northside School for Detained Juveniles Opens -

The charter school that opened for class Thursday, Aug. 15, in North Memphis is unique for several reasons.

A total of 130 children, all of them in the custody of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, are assigned to Thurgood Marshall High School of Career Development. Of that number, 86 had registered on the first day of classes at the school within a school at Northside High School.

93. Magevney House to Reopen in September -

Eight years after it was closed to the public by the city of Memphis, the Magevney House will reopen Sept. 7.

The limited opening of the historic home at 198 Adams Ave., part of the city’s museum system, will be from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on the first Saturday of each month. Tours of the house and garden will take about 40 minutes.

94. Magevney House Reopens in September -

Eight years after it was closed to the public by the city of Memphis, the Magevney House will reopen Sept. 7.

The limited opening of the historic home at 198 Adams Ave., part of the city’s museum system, will be from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on the first Saturday of each month. Tours of the house and garden will take about 40 minutes.

95. Humes Remembers Past, Reflects Future -

Elvis Presley’s alma mater is a very different place these days. But then again, so is the structure of public education in Memphis.

For starters, Humes High School has been a middle school for some time.

96. Democrats Plan Herenton Roast -

Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton will be the guest of honor at a Shelby County Democratic Party roast.

The roast on Sept. 28 at Colonial Country Club will be a fundraiser for the local party going into the 2014 Shelby County elections.

97. Historic School Year Opening Has Familiar Look -

Germantown High School principal Ted Horrell warned a busload of school board members, staff and interim superintendent Dorsey Hopson that they were about to see some confusion on his campus.

On the opening day of the first school year for the unified school system Monday, Aug. 5, Horrell stopped the group just outside the school’s cafeteria, which was in its third of four lunch periods of the school day.

98. School Opening Goes Smoothly With A Few Bumps -

Missed buses and late buses as well as late registration were an expected part of opening day of the consolidated school district.

And the problems arrived just as expected Monday, Aug. 5, but not in large enough numbers to cause any major disruptions on the opening day.

99. School Board Bans Corporal Punishment -

Less than a week from the start of the first year of the consolidated school district, countywide school board members Tuesday, July 30, approved a series of policy decisions that reconcile differences between the old Memphis City Schools and Shelby County Schools systems.

100. School Board Bans Corporal Punishment -

Less than a week from the start of the first year of the consolidated school district, countywide school board members Tuesday, July 30, approved a series of policy decisions that reconcile differences between the old Memphis City Schools and Shelby County Schools systems.