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Editorial Results (free)

1. Memphis Campaigns Shift to Strategy -

With more than a dozen contenders in the race for Memphis mayor, incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was asked Wednesday, July 15, his strategy for such a large field of challengers.

“This is small to what it’s been before,” Wharton said of the still-forming field of 14.

2. Whalum Chooses Council Super District Race -

New Olivet Baptist Church pastor and former Shelby County Schools board member Kenneth Whalum Jr. will run for Memphis City Council in the October 8 city elections.

Standing with family, friends and supporters Tuesday, July 14, in Church Park, Whalum settled weeks of speculation by announcing he will run for council Super District 9 Position 2, formerly held by Shea Flinn.

3. Strickland Files for Mayor One Week From Deadline -

A week before the filing deadline for candidates on Memphis’ October ballot, city councilman Jim Strickland filed his qualifying petition for mayor and said he has a campaign war chest of approximately $400,000.

4. Business in Politics -

One of the first things Shea Flinn noticed when he left the Memphis City Council this year was that benches for audience members in the council chamber are less comfortable than council members’ seats.

5. Chism Political Picnic Offers Pre-Campaign Snapshot -

Memphis mayoral contender Jim Strickland saw a face he didn’t recognize Saturday, June 13, in the southwest Memphis crowd at former County Commissioner Sidney Chism’s annual political picnic.

6. Memphis City Council Appointment Reflects Political Urgency -

Attorney Alan Crone is the newest member of the Memphis City Council.

The former chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party – who said he’s traded politics for nonprofits over the last decade – was the choice of city council members Tuesday, May 19.

7. Crone Joins Council, City Buys State Office Building -

Attorney Alan Crone is the newest member of the Memphis City Council.

The former chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party who has worked in the nonprofit sector for the last decade was the choice of city council members Tuesday, May 19, to fill the vacancy.

8. Council to Fill Vacancy, Consider Buying State Office Building -

Memphis City Council members appoint a new council member Tuesday, May 18, and consider spending more than $8 million to purchase, renovate and relocate workers to the Donnelley J. Hill state office building that stands near City Hall in Civic Center Plaza.

9. Council Vacancy Draws Eight Applicants -

Eight citizens have applied for a vacancy on the Memphis City Council, some with no intention of serving beyond the end of 2015 and others with plans to seek a full, four-year term in the October elections.

10. Council Begins Hearings on Operating Budget -

The Memphis City Council is down a member as its budget committee begins hearings Tuesday, May 5, on the $656.5 million operating budget proposal of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

Council member Shea Flinn resigned Thursday effective immediately to take a position as vice president at the Greater Memphis Chamber in charge of the Chairman’s Circle.

11. Flinn Resigns Council Seat To Join Chamber -

Memphis City Council member Shea Flinn has resigned effective immediately from the council seat he has held since 2007 to take a job with the Greater Memphis Chamber.

Flinn, whose resignation from the council had been rumored earlier this year, becomes senior vice president of the Chairman’s Circle at the chamber effective Monday.

12. Shelby County Gets Two Summer Jobs Programs -

Shelby County Commissioners have created their own two-month summer jobs program for 65 teenagers and college-aged adults and voted Monday, April 27, to fund it over two summers with $169,127 from the commission’s contingency fund.

13. Wanda Halbert to Run For City Court Clerk -

Memphis City Council member Wanda Halbert will not seek re-election in this year’s city elections and will instead run for City Court Clerk.

Halbert pulled a petition for the challenge of incumbent clerk Thomas Long.

14. Wanda Halbert to Run for City Court Clerk -

Memphis City Council member Wanda Halbert will not seek re-election in this year’s city elections and will instead run for City Court Clerk.

Halbert planned to pull a petition Monday, April 20, for the challenge of incumbent clerk Thomas Long.

15. Halbert Passes on Council Re-election Bid To Go For City Court Clerk -

Memphis City Council member Wanda Halbert will not seek re-election in this year's city elections and will instead run for City Court Clerk.

Halbert plans to pull a petition Monday, April 20, for the challenge of incumbent clerk Thomas Long.

16. Lowery Won’t Seek Re-Election -

Memphis City Council chairman Myron Lowery, the longest-serving member of the council, won’t be running for re-election on the October ballot.

17. Collins Won't Seek Re-election -

Memphis City Council member Harold Collins will not be running for re-election to the council this year even if he doesn’t run for Memphis Mayor.

18. Flinn Signals Exit From City Council -

In the political mathematics of an election year, another seat on the Memphis City Council just opened up – sort of.

Council member Shea Flinn went a bit further Wednesday, March 18, than his “no comment” the week before to persistent rumors he might resign from the council and take a job with the Greater Memphis Chamber.

19. Flinn Rumor Could Impact Multiple City Council Races -

Even before Shea Flinn gave a “no comment” last week to a persistent rumor that he would resign from the Memphis City Council, there were potential candidates eyeing his super district seat.

20. Flinn Rumor Could Impact Multiple City Council Races -

Even before Shea Flinn gave a “no comment” last week to a persistent rumor that he would resign from the Memphis City Council, there were potential candidates eyeing his super district seat.

With no qualifying petitions issued for the October ballot until next month, there is stealthy speculation about who is running for council and which seats may be sought.

21. Flinn Gives No Comment to Rumors of Resignation -

For the last week, local politicos, including several Memphis City Council members, have said council member Shea Flinn will resign from his seat soon to take a position with the Greater Memphis Chamber.

22. Financial Debate Looms at City Hall -

With Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. to present his budget proposal to the City Council in May, some on the council started to set the table this week for an election year challenge of Wharton’s methods for righting the city’s financial condition.

23. Mayor’s Race Parses Political Records -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. will probably continue to include the comeback of Overton Square in an election year roll call of economic development accomplishments even after being called out for his opposition to the city-funded Overton Square parking garage.

24. Wharton Defends, Touts Record at State of the City -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. defended and touted Thursday, Jan. 29, his administration’s pursuit of the economic development projects that his challengers in the October city elections will likely use to make their case.

25. Council Approves Schools Deal, Appoints Boyd -

Two weeks after they ignored a proposed $43.1 million settlement of the six-year old schools funding legal standoff, Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Jan. 20, approved a $41.8 million settlement with Shelby County Schools.

26. Council Raises Concerns With Ikea Tax Breaks -

The Economic Development Growth Engine board votes Wednesday, Jan. 21, on the $8 million payment in lieu of taxes for the Ikea retail store to open next year at Interstate 40 and Germantown Parkway.

27. Harris Goes to Nashville -

At his last Memphis City Council session, Lee Harris reflected this week on his three years on the council and the group of politicians he joined.

28. Schools Funding Back to Mediation -

When the city of Memphis and Shelby County Schools leaders and their attorneys meet Thursday, Jan. 8, to restart mediation sessions, there will be some familiar terms on the table to resolve the six-year-old funding dispute between the two.

29. Wharton Whirlwind -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. will ask the Memphis City Council to approve the approximately $30 million in city funding at the core of the settlement of the six-year-old schools funding controversy and lawsuit.

30. Discussion Remains in Schools Settlement -

The Memphis City Council still has a pretty strong case that its approval of a settlement between the city and Shelby County Schools over a six-year-old funding dispute will be necessary at some point.

31. Wharton and Schools Settle Six-Year Funding Dispute Without Council -

It appears Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and the Shelby County Schools board have settled the six-year dispute over city funding for schools without the Memphis City Council.

But the fast-moving compromise will likely require a council vote to fund it.

32. Wharton’s Hybrid Pension Falls in Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s hybrid pension proposal, the second of two parts of his overhaul of city employee benefits, was voted down Tuesday, Nov. 18, by the Memphis City Council in a bid by some on the council to end “uncertainty” among city employees.

33. Pension Reform Decision Back At Square One -

It happened in the shadow of a change in the pension reform proposal Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. had backed all through the summer and two of three council votes.

As the Memphis City Council got its first formal presentation Tuesday, Oct. 21, of Wharton’s new hybrid pension plan, it settled City Hall’s tumultuous discussion about changes to health insurance coverage for city employees and retirees.

34. Council Reopens Seismic Standards Debate -

Memphis City Council members repealed new seismic provisions for homes in the city-county Unified Development Code Tuesday, Oct. 7, about a year after approving them.

The action by the council included passage on the first of three readings of new seismic provisions that would take effect in 2015 if approved by the council and through a companion ordinance by the Shelby County Commission.

35. Some Council Members Feel Dissed By Wharton -

It was a phrase guaranteed to put more diss in the dysfunction between the Memphis City Council and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

And some on the council had plenty to say Tuesday, Oct. 7, about the weekend press release from Wharton announcing changes in the city’s health insurance plan starting next year.

36. Council Could Close Door on Alternative Health Plans -

Memphis City Council members could put to rest alternatives to the health care insurance benefits cuts they approved in June when they meet Tuesday, Sept. 16.

The question is whether they would do that with some kind of vote or indication through discussion or whether they will simply let the June decision stand and take no further votes.

37. Council Bogs Down in Health Insurance Numbers -

When Memphis City Council members meet Tuesday, Sept. 16, they will still be considering alternatives to the health care insurance plan changes they approved in June.

And they probably still will be trying to make sense of a mind-numbing array of conflicting numbers.

38. Council Aims at Moving Insurance Targets -

At just about every turn of the debate at City Hall about changes in health insurance coverage, Memphis City Council members have seen crucial numbers shift about the impact of the changes and the city’s liability.

39. Council To Review Conflicting Health Insurance Numbers -

City government’s open enrollment period for health insurance begins in October and new details of health insurance benefit cuts approved in June go in the mail later this month. Yet Memphis City Council members meet in a special committee session next week to again review conflicting numbers from actuaries on the coverage.

40. Blue Flu Tops 550 Cops Out -

As Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong has watched the number of police officers on sick leave grow and top 550, so has much of the city.

Armstrong and the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. have gone public in not just talking about the impact but putting numbers to it.

41. Armstrong Cancels Regular Days Off as Blue Flu Spreads -

As the work week after the Fourth of July holiday began, the number of Memphis Police officers taking sick leave grew from 308 Sunday evening to 522 by the end of the work day Monday, July 7 in a widening job action by cops unhappy with the city’s cut in health insurance benefits.

42. Armstrong Confirms Blue Flu, Wharton Seeks Alternatives -

More than 400 Memphis police officers called in sick during the Fourth of July holiday week in what Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong acknowledged Sunday, July 6, is most likely an organized work slowdown by officers upset over cuts in health insurance benefits.

43. City to Rework Rights-of-Way Fees -

Allan Wade points to the patchwork pavement on many Memphis streets – square, sometimes rectangular.

44. Council Takes First Steps on Pension, Insurance -

The first votes by the Memphis City Council this week on righting the city’s financial affairs were tentative steps, making it hard to predict whether there will be seven votes to pass dramatic changes in city pensions and health care insurance.

45. Budget Changes Include Cooper-Young Garage -

A Cooper-Young parking garage and a pool of capital funding divided equally among the seven Memphis City Council districts are the two biggest ticket items in the way of still-tentative budget amendments proposed by council members.

46. Council Begins Decisions on City Financial Changes -

Memphis City Council members took the first steps Tuesday, June 3, toward major changes in pension benefits for city employees and began delving into the details of even broader changes in health insurance coverage for city employees and retirees.

47. City Budget Dispute Remains Staring Match -

It was the first thing Memphis Fire Director Alvin Benson told Memphis City Council members Tuesday, May 20, during budget committee hearings.

48. Council Hesitates Over Fire Recruit Class Funding and Charter Restrictions -

Memphis City Council members discussed a new recruit class Tuesday, May 20, for the Memphis Fire Department that is not in Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s budget proposal.

But council members voted down a plan to come up with the $1.7 million for the class of 100 fire recruits from a $3 million cut in the line item for fire department sick leave, proposed by council member Kemp Conrad.

49. City Council Weighs Police Dollars, Oversight -

The Memphis City Council on Tuesday, May 6, got its first detailed look at the Memphis Police Department’s budget proposal, which was followed by the council starting the process of bringing back to life the Police Civilian Review Board. That would begin with a series of community meetings and recommendations from a citizens group in August.

50. Council Questions Five-Year Wharton Plan -

It’s usually a quick bottom line for any local government budget proposal – does it mean a property tax hike?

The $596 million operating budget submitted to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 15, by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. does not include a property tax hike.

51. Council Displeased With Budget Ideas -

This isn’t going to be pretty. Two weeks before Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. takes a budget proposal to the Memphis City Council, council members reacted angrily to how Wharton’s administration set the stage for its definitive recommendations.

52. Council Unhappy With Budget Plans So Far -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. got a rough reception at the Tuesday, April 1, Memphis City Council session as it set the stage for Wharton’s budget proposal to come in two weeks.

53. City Council to Dig Into Pension Liability -

The road to a specific solution to the city’s unsustainable pension liability and employee benefits begins Tuesday, March 4, in detailed, technical and complex financial discussions at City Hall that will dominate the committee schedule of the Memphis City Council.

54. Strickland: Shorten Pension Ramp-Up -

The Memphis City Council chairman thinks the city shouldn’t take five or six years to ramp up to an annual pension fund contribution of $100 million but instead do it in two fiscal years.

“I think everyone is in uniform support of fully funding our annual contribution,” council chairman Jim Strickland said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind the Headlines.” “In fact, I don’t think we ought to take six years. I think we ought to take two years. Get it fully funded, whether its $60 million or $100 million.”

55. Police, Fire Directors Discuss Budget With Council -

Memphis City Council members got deeper Tuesday, Feb. 4, into the specifics of Memphis Police and Fire Department budget decisions.

But they didn’t get a clearer picture of what the direction forward will be as they and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. prepare to make some hard decisions about public safety in dealing with the city’s unfunded pension liability.

56. Council Hears More on Police and Fire Budget Decisions -

Memphis City Council member got deeper Tuesday, Feb. 4, into the specifics of Memphis Police and Fire Department budget decisions.

But they didn’t get a clearer picture of what the direction forward will be as they and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. prepare to make some hard decisions about public safety in dealing with the city’s unfunded pension liability.

57. Commission Approves Ballpark Deal -

The deal for the city of Memphis to buy AutoZone Park and the St. Louis Cardinals to buy the Memphis Redbirds franchise is on its way to a mid-February closing.

Shelby County Commission approval of the county’s part of the deal Monday, Jan. 27, came with a lot of reluctance and some of the same complaints Memphis City Council members had last month – primarily that they were being rushed.

58. Commission Approves Other Part of Ballpark Deal -

Shelby County Commissioners reluctantly approved county government’s part of the AutoZone Park deal Monday, Jan. 27, despite delaying a vote on it at committee sessions last week.

The item was added onto the commission’s agenda by chairman James Harvey who said he could because it was “time sensitive.”

59. Little Outlines Options for City’s Pension Liability -

Changing retirement and health care benefits for city of Memphis employees going forward is a given, said city Chief Administrative Officer George Little this week.

60. City Council Questions Pension Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. plans to ask the Memphis City Council sometime in February or March to close the city’s defined benefits pension plan to new hires and those city employees with less than 10 years of service.

61. Council Opens Unfunded Liability Plan Talks With Questions -

Memphis City Council members again rejected Tuesday, Dec. 17, an increase in the city’s monthly solid waste fee and affirmed a 2.1 percent hike in the Memphis Light Gas and Water Division water rate hike.

62. Polls Open to Decide Sales Tax Increase -

Memphis voters go to the polls Thursday, Nov. 21, to decide the fate of a sales tax hike for the second time in a year.

Polling places across the city are open Thursday from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

63. Events -

Memphis Rotary Club will host a debate between Shea Flinn and Kenneth Whalum Jr. Tuesday, Nov. 19, at noon at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. The topic is “Memphis Sales Tax Increase: Yea or Nay?” Cost for nonmembers is $18. RSVP to Taylor Hughes at taylor@memphisrotary.org.

64. Early Voting Turnout Tops 7,500 -

Early voting in the last elections of 2013 in Shelby County ended Saturday, Nov. 16, with more than 7,500 Memphians casting early votes in the citywide referendum on a half percent sales tax hike.

Of the 7,624 voters, 1,093 voted in the special general election for Tennessee House District 91, the other race on the Memphis ballot within a smaller area of Memphis.

65. Council Rules -

Three Memphis City Council members continue to look at the council’s rules of procedure and how those rules are enforced as the council prepares for the annual election of a new chairman for the new year.

66. Flinn, Whalum Differ on Sales Tax Hike Ballot Question -

To Memphis City Council member Shea Flinn, the only uncertainty about the proposed citywide half-cent sales tax hike on the Nov. 21 ballot is the outcome of the vote.

To former Shelby County Schools board member Rev. Kenneth Whalum, nothing in the ballot question comes close to assuring the money will cover prekindergarten expansion costs the tax is supposed to guarantee.

67. Overton Square Garage Opens -

Visitors to Overton Square know that parking has been at a premium recently, with side streets around the entertainment district filling up as quickly as the restaurants and shops there.

Parking at Overton Square should get much easier with the opening of its 451-space parking garage at the northeast corner of Monroe Avenue and Florence Street. The city-owned garage opened this weekend, and parking is free for the rest of October.

68. City Pension Crisis Meets Sanitation Overhaul -

The city’s looming pension liability crisis and the proposed solution to it intersected Tuesday, Oct. 1, with a plan to overhaul city sanitation services and, in the process, provide a pension supplement to sanitation workers.

69. Council Reappoints Bright to Head EDGE -

The Memphis City Council has approved the reappointment of Al Bright Jr. as chairman of the Economic Development Growth Engine. The Shelby County Commission had previously approved Bright’s reappointment by Wharton and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

70. Council Reappoints Bright to Head EDGE -

The Memphis City Council has approved the reappointment of Al Bright Jr. as chairman of the Economic Development Growth Engine. The Shelby County Commission had previously approved Bright’s reappointment by Wharton and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

71. Wharton Scraps Handy Park Lease -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. scrapped a proposed lease of Handy Park in the Beale Street entertainment district Tuesday, Sept. 17, that would have settled the federal bankruptcy case involving control of the district.

72. Police Plan New Evidence Storage for Rape Kits -

A backlog of thousands of unprocessed rape kits, some dating back to the 1980s, has gone from a plan to process them to a new DNA evidence storage room for the Memphis Police Department.

Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong said Tuesday, Sept. 3, the new evidence storage room would be built at the current police impound lot at the old International Harvester plant in Frayser.

73. Council Gives Early Approval to Solid Waste Fee -

The Memphis City Council sent a proposed lease of Handy Park on Beale Street back to committee Tuesday, Sept. 3, for more discussion about the details.

And the council approved on the first of three readings a restoration of the city’s solid waste fee to $25.05 a month. But there were conflicting explanations about which part of an overhaul of sanitation services the restoration of the fee is supposed to fund.

74. Business Leaders Back Pre-K Initiative -

The Greater Memphis Chamber and members of the business community have come out in support of a half percent hike in the city sales tax rate to fund pre-kindergarten education for more than 4,500 4-year-olds in the city.

75. Three-Month Period Sees Spate of County Elections -

Some of the early voting periods and election days will overlap in the set of 11 elections – special and regularly scheduled – in Shelby County this year.

Those elections would take place in less than a three-month period.

76. Funding for Untested Rape Kits Sparks Debate -

The Memphis City Council’s sharpest debate during a Tuesday, Aug. 20, council agenda with several major issues wasn’t about Smart Meters or changes in garbage pickup.

It was about “several thousand” rape kits Memphis Police have – some dating back to the 1980s – that investigators never processed.

77. Sales Tax Hike Goes to City Voters -

For months, political forces have been gathering to make the case for a half percent hike in the city sales tax rate that would fund a city administered pre-kindergarten program.

But when the Memphis City Council approved on third and final reading Tuesday, Aug. 6, of the ordinance to put it on the ballot for city voters in October, the debate revealed a significant difference of opinion.

78. Council Debates Restoring MATA Service -

A day before the board of the Memphis Area Transit Authority votes on significant cuts in bus and trolley service, the Memphis City Council will review $2.1 million in capital spending for the authority.

79. Council Grapples With Attrition Plan Reality -

Every version of a city budget the Memphis City Council and Mayor A C Wharton Jr. considered in June included a plan to lose 300 city employees through attrition for long-term savings toward meeting rising future debt obligations.

80. Council to Tackle Budget Leftovers -

Meeting for a third consecutive Tuesday, Memphis City Council members take up a few budget leftovers Tuesday, July 2, but also get to some items delayed because of the unusual budget deliberations.

81. Property Tax Hike Highlights New City Budget -

Memphis City Council members raised the city property tax rate Tuesday, June 26, by 4 cents above the recertified tax rate and put the rest of a turbulent budget season to rest.

The approval of the $3.40 property tax rate and city operating and capital budgets came in a council session that ended at 12:30 a.m. Wednesday morning.

82. Council to Take Final Votes on Budget -

The most critical vote at last week’s budget-dominated Memphis City Council meeting may have been the vote to adjourn leaving final budget decisions pending.

It left a week for all sides in the ongoing budget drama at City Hall a wealth of time by political standards to build support for their respective positions.

83. City Budget Woes Affect 400 Employees -

The numbers at play so far in the Memphis City Council’s long budget season are big.

Council members tallied $24.4 million in city operating budget cuts Tuesday, June 18, in a marathon seven-hour session before an overflow crowd of angry city employees.

84. Council Approves $24.2 Million In Budget Cuts -

Memphis City Council members tallied $24.2 million in city operating budget cuts Tuesday, June 18, in a marathon seven-hour session before an overflow crowd of angry city employees.

But the council adjourned before taking a final vote on the operating budget as amended or setting a city property tax rate.

85. Pre-Kindergarten Expansion in Funding Limbo -

The idea of a city sales tax hike to fund an expansion of pre-kindergarten classrooms in Memphis schools may have been buried this week.

It happened as the City Council fielded a proposal from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. for a 15-cent property tax hike on top of the 25-cent increase in the tax rate as the recertified city property tax rate.

86. Budget Reset Talks Lead to Fresh Drama -

The Memphis City Hall budget drama turned from a budget reset into a political thicket Tuesday, June 4, as Memphis City Council members debated getting involved in the details of changing employee and retiree benefits.

87. Wharton Pitches Options But No Recommendations On Budget Reset -

Memphis City Council members were looking Thursday, May 30, for a new budget plan to get City Hall on new financial footing after a state comptroller’s office report critical of city financial practices.

88. Critical State Report Remakes City Budget -

An April report from the Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury critical of city finances threw the budget season at City Hall into remake mode Tuesday, May 21.

The bottom line for the budget is a remediation plan that will increase the city’s long term debt, force the city to use its reserves, and take reserves below the 10 percent level considered key with bond-rating agencies.

89. Shelby County Tax Rate Endgame Takes Shape -

To some it’s a calculation with no binding effect on what is to come. To others on the Shelby County Commission it is an indication that a county property tax increase is about to be railroaded through.

90. Property Tax Complicates Sales Tax Considerations -

Whether it is a tax hike or a tax rate hike, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s proposed 28-cent increase in the city property tax rate has complicated the idea of a half-percent city sales tax hike to go on the ballot later this year if the property tax hike sticks.

91. City Council OKs School Funding Talks -

The newest front in the move to the schools merger in less than two months is an old legal claim that continues to pop up as the countywide school board looks for any new funding it can secure.

Memphis City Council members passed a resolution Tuesday, May 7, to start negotiations among the council, the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and the countywide school board.

92. Police Budget Passes Early Council Test -

The Memphis City Council’s budget committee approved the largest budget for any single city division Tuesday, May 7.

But the committee debate before the vote set the stage for what is expected to be more discussion about how much the Memphis Police Department needs to protect and serve.

93. Council Moves on School Funding Standoff -

Memphis City Council members want to try to resolve the Memphis City Schools $57 million court judgment against the city as well as the city’s legal counterclaim that the school system owes it more than twice that by the end of this month.

94. Beyond the Numbers -

It’s that time of year again when thick budget books dominate life for those in the Memphis and Shelby County governments.

But this year’s budget season on both sides of the Civic Center Plaza is more than line items and bottom lines on paper. The deliberations that ultimately determine how much you will pay in property taxes and at what rate go beyond the plans in the books of estimates, projections and the recurring and one-time revenue sources.

95. Questions Kick Off City Budget Hearings -

Memphis City Council members opened budget committee hearings Tuesday, April 23, on the clock and with lots of questions about what seemed to some like different budget numbers from last year at this time by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

96. Severance Pay Ups Ante in Auto Inspections Stand-Off -

Some on the Memphis City Council weren’t certain Tuesday, April 16, about going ahead with a severance package for the city employees who now work at city-run auto inspection stations.

The council entered the budget season for the new fiscal year that begins July 1 just minutes earlier with Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s budget address.

97. Budget Season Opens With Wharton Proposal -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. presents his budget proposal Tuesday, April 16, to the Memphis City Council for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

And council members will probably be listening closely for one dollar amount in particular and how Wharton proposes to deal with it.

98. Luttrell Doesn’t Want Memphis Animal Shelter -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said Wednesday, April 11, he is not interested in making the Memphis Animal Shelter a county government operation.

99. Luttrell Doesn’t Want Memphis Animal Shelter -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said Wednesday, April 11, he is not interested in making the Memphis Animal Shelter a county government operation.

100. City Council Delays Sales Tax Hike Votes -

Memphis City Council members delayed until their first meeting in July final votes on an ordinance setting a late summer or fall referendum on a citywide sales tax hike and a resolution designating what the revenue will be used for.