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Editorial Results (free)

1. City Mulls Plan to Buy Former State Building -

It would be cheaper and more efficient for the city of Memphis to lease and then buy the vacant Donnelley J. Hill state office building across Main Street from Memphis City Hall than to continue leasing multiple properties spread across town, consultants and city officials told City Council members Tuesday.

2. Council Hears Tentative Plans for Office Building -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration would move the Memphis Police Department, information technology services and six city agencies renting offices on Union Avenue Extended into the Donnelley J. Hill office building if the city goes through with a plan to swap the office building with state government in exchange for parking spaces in the Peabody Place garage.

3. City Council Hears Tentative Plans for Office Building -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration would move the Memphis Police Department, information technology services and six city agencies renting offices on Union Avenue Extended into the Donnelley J. Hill office building if the city goes through with a plan to swap the office building with state government in exchange for parking spaces in the Peabody Place garage.

4. Southbrook Mall Concept Goes to Public Hearings -

As city Housing and Community Development Director Robert Lipscomb began talking in the gym of the Whitehaven Community Center last week, he could see the Pepper Tree Apartments on the other side of Graceland Drive.

5. Out With the Old -

A small group of people gathered last week in the front room of a new Southwest Memphis housing development for senior citizens.

The scene marked the ending of one era in public housing and the start of another as the doors opened to the newest facility in the nearly 20-year makeover of public housing.

6. Raleigh Springs Mall Owners Question City’s Plans -

The owners of the Raleigh Springs Mall had been talking with Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration until late last year about the city’s desire to see a revitalized mall possibly with city government offices.

7. Southbrook Mall Plans Simmer -

If the city is going to spend money on a renovation of the Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven, it should be part of a larger plan for Whitehaven and tie in to the aerotropolis concept.

That’s what city Housing and Community Development Director Robert Lipscomb said Tuesday, April 15, as he outlined a $6.5 million plan for turning the mall into a “town center” that includes some city government offices and private retail.

8. Wharton Outlines $596 Million Budget Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. warned Tuesday, April 15, that “half measures” in converting city employees to a defined contributions benefits plan would not restore the city’s financial health and resolve an unfunded pension liability of hundreds of millions of dollars.

9. Tour Shows Work Progressing in Pyramid -

The opening date for Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid is still tentative.

But it appears to now be in December depending on who you talked with this week as the outdoors retailer offered a look inside The Pyramid.

10. Three Town Center Concepts Take Shape -

The city of Memphis would move government offices into two shopping malls and the Soulsville Town Center under tentative “conceptual” plans Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. took Tuesday, Feb. 18, to the Memphis City Council.

11. Council Tours Pyramid, Weighs City Offices In Two Malls -

Memphis City Council members heard Tuesday, Feb. 18, that the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. wants to move some city government offices into the Soulsville Town Center in South Memphis and is weighing whether to renovate or tear down and build anew on the site of the Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven.

12. City Delays Fairgrounds Zone Application Vote -

The city of Memphis won’t be going to the Tennessee Building Commission in Nashville this week for approval of a Tourism Development Zone for the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. decided to delay the proposal last week as it reviewed the fairgrounds renovation financing plan with Memphis City Council members.

13. Heritage Trail Financing Plans Change -

The city of Memphis is making changes in its plans to finance two housing developments that are part of the broader Heritage Trail plan for redevelopment of the area south of FedExForum and into South Memphis.

14. City, County Differ on Fairgrounds Zone -

The city of Memphis and Shelby County governments have a difference of opinion about tax revenue and education funding.

It is over where the sales tax revenue would go within a tourism development zone the city wants to use to finance the redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

15. Billingsley Is Newest County Commissioner As "Tax Dead" Program Advances -

Former Germantown alderman Mark Billingsley is the newest Shelby County Commissioner.

On the second ballot Monday, Jan. 13, commissioners appointed Billingsley to fill the vacancy created by the resignation this month of Wyatt Bunker, who became mayor of Lakeland last year.

16. Plans in Works for Dormant Midtown Project -

City officials are working on plans to kick-start the dormant Washington Bottoms project at Poplar Avenue and Cleveland Street in Midtown.

Memphis Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb confirmed that he is working on the effort but said he was not yet able to release detailed information on the project.

17. Debt and Liability -

There is rarely a good answer to the question “How much?” in politics.

With issues including the unfunded pension liability, overall debt, and revenue estimates and their validity, City Hall’s overall money problem begins but hardly ends with the question. It won’t be that simple.

18. Council Opens Unfunded Liability Plan Talks With Questions -

Memphis City Council members again rejected Tuesday, Dec. 17, an increase in the city’s monthly solid waste fee and affirmed a 2.1 percent hike in the Memphis Light Gas and Water Division water rate hike.

19. Bad Blood -

December was already going to be a busy month at City Hall for the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

He would be bringing a plan to provide $15 million in city financing for the $180 million Crosstown revitalization project and rolling out its fix to address the Tennessee Comptroller’s vocal concerns about the city’s unfunded pension liability.

20. Pay Raises, Germantown Schools Deal Top Commission Agenda -

Shelby County Commissioners won’t be voting on anything having to do with the proposed sale of AutoZone Park when they meet Monday, Dec. 16.

The resolution involving their piece of the original terms of financing for the ballpark in 1998 was pulled from the agenda of the last meeting of 2013 at the request of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. last week.

21. Crosstown Effort Shines as Development Example -

Construction documents for the $180 million revitalization of the Crosstown building were scheduled to be finished Friday, Dec. 6, with the project moving toward closing and construction in the next months.

22. Council’s Ire at Wharton Timing Grows -

It is a political constant in life at City Hall for Memphis City Council members to complain that they get critical information much too late in the decision-making process and then are pressured by the mayor to make a decision then and there.

23. Crosstown Funding Mix of Local, State and Federal -

The $15 million in funding Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration put together as the last piece of financing for the Sears Crosstown building redevelopment is not just a combination of state and federal grant money.

24. Football Part of Planning at LeMoyne-Owen -

The new $13.5 million four-story residence hall at LeMoyne-Owen College that formally opened Friday, Oct. 18, is the latest symbol of growth on the campus of the city’s only historically black college since 2006.

25. ‘Handle With Care’ -

Once the settlement of a lawsuit over control of Beale Street is complete, the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. plans on issuing requests for firms to manage and develop the thriving entertainment district.

26. Basar Looks to 2014 County Commission Election -

It may be the first time that a Shelby County Commissioner has given public notice of a barbecue.

Commissioner Steve Basar has held four at his house in the year that he’s been on the elected body. And he told political supporters at a fundraiser last week that he has “sunshined” all of them, a shorthand term to describe the public notice required by Tennessee’s open meetings law – or Sunshine Law – for any deliberative gathering of two or more commissioners.

27. County Leaders Blast Fairgrounds Tourism Development Zone Financing Plan -

Shelby County government leaders say a city plan to use incremental sales tax revenue within a tourism development zone to revitalize the Fairgrounds will take the share of that revenue that goes to Shelby County Schools.

28. Lipscomb: Fairgrounds Retail to be ‘Market Driven’ -

Robert Lipscomb, director of the city of Memphis’ Division of Housing & Community Development, says the retail to be part of the city’s Fairgrounds overhaul will not be in competition with businesses in the nearby Cooper-Young Historic District or Overton Square.

29. City Explores Crucial Crosstown Funding -

City officials are exploring multiple options for financing $15 million in infrastructure improvements at the Sears Crosstown site, key funding that could make or break the ambitious $175 million project.

30. Tax Zone Would Fund Fairgrounds Remake -

A 3-square-mile Tourism Development Zone would finance a $233 million renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds sought by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

The city sent its 88-page application Sept. 13 to Tennessee Finance Commissioner Larry B. Martin. The application seeks state permission to use incremental sales tax revenue estimated at close to $12 million a year starting in 2016 to pay off the bonds to finance a project whose price tag is just below the $250 million FedExForum.

31. Memphis Considers Options for Raleigh Springs Mall -

The city of Memphis is considering acquiring the Raleigh Springs Mall site as part of a civic-driven effort to revive the former retail hub.

“We’re going to explore every option we have, but yes, that is certainly an option,” said City Council member Bill Morrison, whose district includes the area.

32. Adams Property Would Unite Police Functions -

The stars could be aligning for the Memphis Police Department to finally move out of the Shelby County Criminal Justice Center in Downtown.

Cost estimates for the department to renovate the old police headquarters on Adams Avenue have dropped and financing sources that could lighten the city’s cost burden are being explored, two important steps that could finally prompt a move.

33. Multiple Reasons Forced Trail to Lose Funding -

Bureaucratic snafus, a lack of city funds and the transformation of The Pyramid into a Bass Pro Shops store led the city to lose a $316,680 federal grant for a riverfront bike and pedestrian system.

34. Multiple Reasons Forced Trail to Lose Funding -

Bureaucratic snafus, a lack of city funds and the transformation of The Pyramid into a Bass Pro Shops store led the city to lose a $316,680 federal grant for a riverfront bike and pedestrian system.

35. City Council Again Tackles Budget, Tax Rate -

Some Memphis City Council members say they are prepared for a long day Tuesday, June 18, at City Hall as they continue down the arduous path to a tax rate and budget for the coming fiscal year.

“Let’s just be ready to spend the night,” said council member Harold Collins last week. He commented as council-mediated discussions between the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and municipal union leaders on possible cuts in employee benefits got nowhere quickly and ended after less than an hour.

36. City Budget Reset Stalls for Council -

Memphis City Council members looking for a five-year budget plan of some kind last week were told by city Chief Financial Officer Robert Lipscomb that most of the ideas hadn’t been properly vetted yet.

37. Wharton Pitches Options But No Recommendations On Budget Reset -

Memphis City Council members were looking Thursday, May 30, for a new budget plan to get City Hall on new financial footing after a state comptroller’s office report critical of city financial practices.

38. Civic Leader Says City Has ‘Right Stuff’ -

A little less than two years ago, Dr. Robert Ross was up for a standard performance review from the board of the foundation he leads.

39. Aerotropolis Pitch to Council Receives Mixed Reaction -

After years of very general talk about the aerotropolis concept, Memphis City Council members are ready for leaders of the effort to bring it in for a landing in specific terms that work with plans in smaller areas of the district around Memphis International Airport.

40. Crosstown Project Has $15 Million City "Ask" -

Leaders of the Crosstown Development Project are asking the city of Memphis for $15 million toward a $175 million project.

Memphis City Council members got a look Tuesday, March 19, at the “ask” as well as the finances and goals of the project centered on the old 1.5 million square foot Sears Crosstown building.

41. Pilot Program Helps Seniors Maintain Independence -

The MetLife Foundation and Partners for Livable Communities recently selected the Plough Foundation and Memphis to participate in the City Leaders Institute on Aging in Place, a national pilot project striving to help people aged 65 years and older to live independently in their homes.

42. Tax Zone Would Benefit Fairgrounds -

The Tourism Development Zone that Memphis officials will seek in Nashville over the next three months would generate tax revenue from Cooper-Young, the Midtown Union Avenue corridor and Overton Square for the redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

43. City Council Approves Fairgrounds TDZ Request -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Feb. 19, plans for a tourism development zone to capture sales tax revenue in a large area for a renovation of the Fairgrounds property at first.

The boundaries of the zone go to the state for approval and city Community and Housing Development division director Robert Lipscomb said such a proposal could be at the state building commission in Nashville in April.

44. Reardon Cautions Downtowners About Heritage Trail -

The University of Memphis professor spearheading the opposition of demolishing the city’s last remaining public housing project in the Vance Avenue neighborhood says that while the Heritage Trail Community Redevelopment Plan appears to be on “indefinite hold,” it is not dead, and Downtowners should beware.

45. Complex Agenda -

In the first year of his first full four-year term of office as Memphis mayor, A C Wharton Jr. put his political weight behind shifting priorities at City Hall.

In that year, he attempted to broaden the police department’s anti-crime strategy beyond the Blue CRUSH brand of hot spot crime crackdowns. He moved further in his long-held quest to redefine violence – particularly gun violence – as a public health issue. And Wharton continued to meld private funding with an advancing of public funding from different pockets to move capital construction projects inside and outside of the Downtown core area in a stubborn post-recession environment.

46. Heritage Trail Complexity a Concern -

As 2012 comes to an end, the most ambitious plan from City Hall for the revitalization of an inner-city area in 15 years of such projects has hit a critical stage.

The idea of a tax increment financing zone for a large swath of the area south of FedExForum as well as the Downtown area itself into South Memphis is being examined closely by Shelby County Commissioners before they commit county property tax revenues with the “Heritage Trail” zone.

47. Council to Review $12 Million Stadium ADA Plan -

Memphis City Council members get their first look Tuesday, Dec. 18, at the plan to pay for improvements at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium to settle the city’s negotiations with the U.S. Justice Department over making the stadium comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

48. Agency to Weigh Plan for Heritage Trails in Early 2013 -

The group that will determine whether there is a tax increment financing zone for the city’s Heritage Trails redevelopment plan should begin considering the specifics of the development plan itself starting in mid-January.

49. Opponents of School Closings Raise Concerns -

The first of three of the most politically challenging decisions the countywide school board has to make about the consolidation of public schools probably won’t happen this week.

Instead of taking a first preliminary vote Thursday, Nov. 29, to close 21 schools by the August merger date, Memphis City Schools superintendent Kriner Cash is asking the board to start a set of “impact studies” and schedule public hearings for closing five elementary schools.

50. Reardon Speaks Out Against City’s Approach to Housing -

The University of Memphis professor leading the resistance to a still-forming plan to demolish the city’s last large public housing project says the city’s approach to transforming public housing since the late 1990s hasn’t worked.

51. Soul Map -

The Soulsville arrows beneath the Bellevue Boulevard railroad overpasses near Walker Avenue point north and south. It is the first indication that you are in an area where several possibilities can coexist.

52. LeMoyne-Owen Announces 'Unprecedented' Gift -

Officials of LeMoyne-Owen College will announce Friday, Oct. 18, a new gift to the city’s only historically black college from a revocable trust fund of a 1940 alumni of the school.

Wylodine Taylor Patton of San Francisco established the trust fund in 2001 and granted LeMoyne-Owen College 75 percent of her estate. She died in 2009 and the college received a $500,000 gift from the trust. Since then the estate has sold several properties Patton owned in the San Francisco area.

53. Vance Plan Could Move to Land Use Control Board -

Memphis City Council members recommended Tuesday, Oct. 16, sending a plan to the Land Use Control Board that calls for the revitalization of the Vance Avenue area and leaves the Foote Homes public housing development intact.

54. Foreclosures Continue Rise in Third Quarter -

At a public gathering at Calvary Episcopal Church last week, the city’s Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb lamented the pervasiveness of poverty in Memphis.

55. Council Approves Non Discrimination Ordinance, Adds Resolution -

Memphis City Council members approved on third and final reading an ordinance Tuesday, Oct. 16, that forbids the city from discriminating in hiring, firing or promotion based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

56. City Council to Vote on Discrimination Ordinance -

With a legal opinion from City Attorney Herman Morris in hand, Memphis City Council members on Tuesday, Oct. 16, again take up an ordinance that would ban the city from discriminating in hiring and promotions based on sexual orientation.

57. Council to Vote on Cleaborn Homes -

With a vote Tuesday, Oct. 2, the Memphis City Council will change the name of the old Cleaborn Homes public housing development to Cleaborn Pointe at Heritage Landing and the name of the larger south Downtown-into-South Memphis Triangle Noir plan to Heritage Trails.

58. Difference of Opinion -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration and a group of neighborhood leaders in the Vance Avenue area agree on highlighting the significant history of the area south of FedExForum.

Some kind of trail linking up more than a dozen sights is a feature both groups are planning for the area.

59. Vance Collaborative to Unveil Plan -

When the Vance Avenue Collaborative unveils its five-year, six-project plan Thursday, Sept. 13, for revitalizing the area south of FedExForum there will be some differences from what Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration has been thinking.

60. Funding Approved for Felon Program -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration is retooling the city’s “Second Chance” program for felons just released from prison to become a joint city-county program with funding from the state.

61. Council Could Dissolve Coliseum Board -

Memphis City Council members take another step Tuesday, Sept. 4, toward an emerging new push for redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds by Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration.

The council meets at 3:30 p.m. at City Hall, 125 N. Main St.

62. Nonprofit Center Could be New South Memphis Gateway -

The giant milk bottle will outlive the old dairy plant it stands atop in South Memphis. For more than 80 years, the giant milk bottle adorning a now old and crumbling dairy building on Bellevue Boulevard at Walker Avenue has been an icon.

63. Venson Center Work Kicks Off Heritage Trail -

The ambitious $1 billion, 10-year redevelopment project called Triangle Noir during former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton’s administration is now called Heritage Trail.

And the first move beyond the demolition of the Cleaborn Homes public housing development is the exterior renovation of the R.Q. Venson Center high rise at Beale Street and Danny Thomas Boulevard.

64. City Leaders Look to New Governing Plan -

When 10 of the 13 Memphis City Council members get together around a table it is usually in their committee room on the fifth floor of City Hall for their regular meetings.

But last week they gathered in Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s seventh-floor conference room at his request.

65. Council Mulls Funds for Fairgrounds -

Memphis City Council members take a step closer to redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds Tuesday, Aug. 21, with $1.7 million in sales tax revenue generated in the Tourism Development Zone that includes The Pyramid.

66. New Ideas for Fairgrounds Emerge As Bass Pro Project Moves Ahead -

A C Wharton Jr. noted last week that as Shelby County mayor he signed the paperwork selling Shelby County government’s partial ownership interest in The Pyramid to the city of Memphis. And as Memphis mayor, he signed the paperwork making the city’s exclusive ownership of The Pyramid official.

67. Mall Makeover -

Over the years, it has become harder and harder to tell that Whitehaven has two shopping malls.

Southbrook Mall was built across East Shelby Drive from Southland Mall, the city’s first shopping mall, which preceded Southbrook by five years.

68. Worldly View -

Ron Paul would feel right at home in the Economic Club of Memphis audience next week.

Duke University professor Bruce Caldwell will speak to the club Thursday, March 15, to make a presentation titled “Some (mostly) Austrian insights for these trying times.” That’s Austrian, as in the Austrian school of economic thought represented by a particular brand of deficit hawkishness, bailout-ballyhooing and bristling against big government that Paul the perennial Republican presidential candidate loudly champions.

69. Events -

The Tennessee Beta Unit of Parliamentarians will meet Monday, Feb. 27, at 5:45 p.m. at the Poplar-White Station Branch Library, 5094 Poplar Ave. Those interested in expanding their knowledge of parliamentary law and Robert’s Rules of Order are welcome to attend.

70. Uplifting Project -

One-fourth of The Pyramid’s deconstruction is complete, and the project to transform the arena into a Bass Pro Shops superstore by August 2013 is even slightly ahead of schedule.

The city in October filed a $2.5 million building permit to begin new construction work on The Pyramid. By mid-November, the first phase – the demolition – was kicked off by general contractor Montgomery Martin Contractors LLC.

71. MED Fdtn. Names Brandenburg Director of Development -

Joe Brandenburg has joined The MED Foundation as director of development.

Hometown: Connersville, Ind.

Education: B.A., mass communications, Western Kentucky University; master’s in public administration, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

72. SRVS Nominees Receive Disability Awards -

SRVS personnel received Community Recognition awards at the Arc Mid-South’s 16th Annual Arc Gala.

Beverly Shaw, SRVS’ community living director, received the Professional Achievement Award.

73. Fate of Ramesses Statue Still Hangs in Balance -

The fate of the Ramesses statue outside The Pyramid was delayed for another two weeks at City Hall as a Memphis City Council member again derailed the effort to move the monolith to the University of Memphis campus.

74. CCRFC Approves Bonds for Pyramid, Convention Ctr. -

The Center City Revenue Finance Corp. has approved the bond financing that should make it possible to begin construction Oct. 1 on the adaptive reuse of The Pyramid.

75. County Commission Approves City Convention Center Buyout -

Shelby County Commissioners have approved selling county government’s share of the Memphis Cook Convention Center to the city of Memphis for $75 million.

The commission vote Monday, Aug. 22, came after city Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb fielded a lot of questions from several commissioners about the Bass Pro Shops renovation of The Pyramid.

76. Commission Considers Convention Center Buyout -

It was May 2009 when the Shelby County Commission sold the county’s share of The Pyramid to the city of Memphis.

At the time, A C Wharton Jr. was Shelby County mayor and Robert Lipscomb was city director of Housing and Community Development. And with commission approval Monday, Aug. 22, of a similar buyout of the county’s interest in the Memphis Cook Convention Center, Wharton will sign the contract as the city of Memphis mayor.

77. County Commission Reviews City Buyout of Convention Center -

Shelby County Commissioners reviewed Wednesday, Aug. 17, the city of Memphis’ plan to buy out the county’s share of the Memphis Cook Convention Center for $75 million.

The 6-1 vote in committee is a recommendation of the resolution that goes to the full commission Monday, Aug. 22, for a vote.

78. Council Approves Expansion of Pyramid Project -

Memphis City Council members approved a bond resolution that expands the scope of The Pyramid renovation by Bass Pro Shops.

The project now includes a $75 million city buyout of the county’s interest in the Memphis Cook Convention Center, $5 million more for what had been a $10 million city purchase of the Lone Star concrete facility near The Pyramid and a $25 million seismic retrofit of The Pyramid and the land bordering the Wolf River Harbor.

79. Council Gets Details Of Pyramid Construction -

When Memphis City Council members hear Tuesday, Aug. 16, that the Bass Pro Shops conversion of The Pyramid is again ready to move, they also will be asked to approve a pair of resolutions to finance a city buyout of county government’s interest in the Memphis Cook Convention Center as well as the development of the nearby Pinch District.

80. Events -

The Small Business Chamber Breakfast Club will meet Friday, June 24, from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Office Suites Plus, 6000 Poplar Ave., suite 250. Cost is free to members and first-time guests and $10 for returning guests. For more information, call Melody Douglas at 261-5400.

81. Events -

Methodist North Hospital will host a free seminar on congestive heart failure Thursday, June 23, from 11 a.m. to1 p.m. at the hospital, 3950 Covington Pike, suite 250. Dr. Claro Diaz, cardiologist with Sutherland Cardiology Clinic, will speak. The event is free and open to the public. To register, call 888-777-5959.

82. McKinley Park Opening to be Held Saturday -

A grand opening of the McKinley Park subdivision and the homeownership phase of the 30-home Hope VI development will be held Saturday, June 25, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Downtown subdivision, 679 E. Georgia Ave.

83. $800K Grant to Help Public Housing Residents -

Nearly $800,000 in federal funding is on its way to the city of Memphis to prepare public housing residents for life outside the vanishing developments.

And Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. hinted this week that much more in U.S. Housing and Urban Development funding is on the way shortly for other parts of the ongoing move in the city away from public housing.

84. Steamboats To Call Miss. River Home Once Again -

The overnight riverboat cruise business has certainly had its share of false starts in recent years. The trouble began in 2001, six years after The Delta Queen Steamboat Co. had the largest steamboat in the world built. The company went bankrupt and The American Queen went out of service.

85. ‘Melrose Place’ Apartments Moving in to Orange Mound -

What to call a refurbished apartment complex in Orange Mound near Melrose High School that aims to draw college students as tenants. Melrose Place, of course.

The 80-unit Melrose Place will replace what is now the vacant 164-unit Barronbrook Apartments at 3000 Barron Ave. at Semmes Street. City leaders including Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. marked the opening of the project Tuesday at the Orange Mound Community Center.

86. Cohen to Address the State of Housing Monday -

The Memphis Chapter of National Association of Real Estate Brokers will present a panel discussion on the “State of Housing” Monday.

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, will kick off the discussion, followed by an panel covering an array of subjects from legislative acts to mortgages to state-funded programs that stop foreclosure proceedings.

87. Cleaborn Homes Demolition Begins -

Cleaborn Homes, a defining part of the inner city landscape south of Downtown Memphis for decades, began to fall Tuesday morning.

Demolition of the public housing development and others began as a goal of the Herenton administration and continues with the Wharton administration.

88. Cleaborn Homes Demolition Begins -

Cleaborn Homes, a defining part of the inner city landscape south of Downtown Memphis for decades, began to fall Tuesday morning.

Demolition of the public housing development and others began as a goal of the Herenton administration and continues with the Wharton administration.

89. Events -

The Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence will hold a workshop Wednesday from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at its office, 5100 Poplar Ave., Suite 502. Participants will learn about the fundamentals of nonprofit communications. Cost is $99 for members, $150 for nonmembers and $89 for those in the Program for Nonprofit Excellence. For more information, call 684-6605 or visit www.npexcellence.org.

90. Pyramid Seismic Issues Could Get Two-Part Study -

Finding out whether a seismic retrofit of The Pyramid is worth the money to the city will cost the city at least $5.2 million.

That’s what city Housing and Community Development Director Robert Lipscomb told Memphis City Council members this week. Lipscomb proposed a $5.2 million “below ground” study of The Pyramid after a consulting company is hired through a request for proposal process.

91. City Seeks Fast Fairgrounds Development -

The $15 million creation of Tiger Lane last year at the Mid-South Fairgrounds happened within budget and so quickly that Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration would like to use the method to venture into the more complex parts of the renovation of the city-owned property.

92. Council Considers Fairgrounds Bridge Loan - Partial Pyramid Seismic Study -

A plan to finance $25 million in Fairgrounds improvements with a bridge loan from the city’s Capital Improvement Projects got a frosty reception Tuesday from Memphis City Council members.

City Housing and Community Development Director Robert Lipscomb floated the idea as he updated the council on the plans for Fairgrounds renovation as well as the latest on the city’s quest to renovate The Pyramid for a Bass Pro Shops store and other attractions.

93. NHOM Brings Housing Opportunities to Working Poor -

For more than two decades, Neighborhood Housing Opportunities Management Executive Director Howard Eddings and his team have worked to rebuild Memphis neighborhoods most plagued by urban decay, whose broken windows and overgrown lots have become familiar eyesores in the wake of the Great Recession.

94. Bass Pro’s Pyramid Plans Shaken by Seismic Concerns -

It’s always been about the chance of an earthquake.

The biggest hurdle three Memphis mayoral administrations in five years have had to clear was a seismic retrofitting of The Pyramid for its redevelopment by Bass Pro Shops.

95. Pyramid Problems Could Move Bass Pro Shops Project -

Bass Pro Shops is still committed to a super store and other attractions Downtown, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. told the Memphis City Council Tuesday. But that doesn’t necessarily mean the outdoors retailer is still committed to a conversion of The Pyramid.

96. Wharton Administration Rolls Out New Fairgrounds Plan -

Four months after Tiger Lane made its debut, the Wharton administration has rolled out a much more expensive and complex proposal for the continued remaking of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

All of the tentative pieces of the fairgrounds renovation would cost $185 million to develop. The plan is to finance all or some of them using sales tax revenue returned to the city for the financing of the project through use of a tourism development zone.

97. New Fairgrounds Plan Would Demolish Coliseum, Build Stores -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. has outlined a $185 million plan for redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

Wharton and city Housing and Community Development Director Robert Lipscomb outlined the plan Tuesday afternoon at the Memphis City Council’s executive session.

98. Plan to Reduce Homelessness Takes Shape -

An ambitious action plan to end homelessness in the long term and make significant cuts in the numbers of homeless in Memphis and Shelby County in the next five to 10 years goes to a vote this week.

99. Council Approves $3M in Triangle Noir Funding -

Memphis City Council members have appropriated $3 million in federal funding to begin demolition of the Cleaborn Homes public housing development.

The demolition work, slated to begin in February, is part of a more ambitious 10-year $1 billion development plan called Triangle Noir. While the council approved the funding, some council members said they want to see a new name for the plan, which would take in the area south of FedExForum and move into South Memphis.

100. Rotary Seeks Nominations for Dunavant Award -

The Rotary Club of Memphis East is seeking nominees for its 8th annual Bobby Dunavant Public Service Award, an event that honors distinguished work by public officials.