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Editorial Results (free)

1. Plough Grant Requires All Rape Kits Be Tested -

Before they agreed to put up $750,000 toward funding the disposition of the city’s untested rape kit backlog, leaders of the Plough Foundation wanted assurances that the city would process every rape kit.

2. Entrepreneurial Eagles -

It was a gathering of eagles. You know, the people who like to soar, and, more importantly, they like to push eaglets out of the nest so that they can also learn to soar.

And, like eagles, they have both vision and focus. I recently attended the CSG Entrepreneurship Days, sponsored by the Council of State Governments’ State Pathways to Prosperity Initiative and State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, who is the 2014 CSG National Chair.

3. Norris Defends Rape Kit Backlog Approach -

State Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville says the Tennessee Legislature wants to know the size of the statewide problem of untested rape kits, an explanation of why it happened and a credible plan for eliminating it before coming up with funding to deal with the problem.

4. Entrepreneur Day Spotlights Power of Innovation -

Already in recent weeks, Moziah “Mo” Bridges, the 12-year-old founder of the Memphis-based Mo’s Bows bow tie business, has appeared on the hit ABC show “Shark Tank.”

If the exposure alone wasn’t enough, Bridges also impressed fashion mogul and “Shark Tank” panelist Daymond John into offering to mentor him.

5. Parkinson, White Compare Notes Across Aisle -

Two state representatives from Memphis say the 19-member Shelby County delegation in the Tennessee General Assembly isn’t as united as it should be.

“I have to be brutally honest. I have yet to see us come together and move as a block for Shelby County,” Democratic state Rep. Antonio Parkinson said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind the Headlines.” “There appears to be an alignment with some members of our delegation that align with other parts of Tennessee before they align with Shelby County. I’m optimistic that will shift.”

6. Events -

Tennessee Shakespeare Company will present “The Taming of the Shrew” Wednesday, April 23, through May 4 at Dixon Gallery and Gardens, 4339 Park Ave. Buy tickets at tnshakespeare.org.

7. Tenn. Lawmakers Discuss Common Core Compromise -

State lawmakers are considering compromise legislation that would delay the testing component for Tennessee's Common Core education standards for one year.

Last month, a broad coalition of Republican and Democratic House members passed a bill seeking to delay further implementation of the new standards for two years. It also seeks to delay the testing component for the standards for the same amount of time.

8. Wharton Takes Budget to City Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. takes a budget proposal to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 15, that is supposed to be a departure for an administration that, since 2010, has come to the council with options instead of a total budget plan.

9. Haslam Free Tuition Plan Garners Praise, Concern -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's signature proposal this year, a program that would cover a full ride at two-year colleges for any high school graduate, appears on track to pass as lawmakers enter the waning days of the legislative session. The details, however – including how to pay for this perk in the years to come – remain scattered.

10. Senate Passes Medicaid Legislative Approval Bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal that requires Gov. Bill Haslam to secure legislative approval for any potential deal to expand Medicaid in Tennessee has passed the Senate even though the Republican governor has already said he would consult with lawmakers.

11. Norris Finds Legislative Leadership Has its Price -

Many people who like problem solving usually tackle a tough crossword, or maybe Sudoku.

Collierville’s Mark Norris opted for politics.

12. Norris to Chair Council Of State Governments -

Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris is among two southerners leading the Council of State Governments.

13. Strickland: Shorten Pension Ramp-Up -

The Memphis City Council chairman thinks the city shouldn’t take five or six years to ramp up to an annual pension fund contribution of $100 million but instead do it in two fiscal years.

“I think everyone is in uniform support of fully funding our annual contribution,” council chairman Jim Strickland said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind the Headlines.” “In fact, I don’t think we ought to take six years. I think we ought to take two years. Get it fully funded, whether its $60 million or $100 million.”

14. Lawmakers Seek Compromise on School Voucher Bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Lawmakers trying to decide on a limited school voucher program in Tennessee or a broader one say they're close to reaching an agreement on legislation.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville is carrying a proposal for Republican Gov. Bill Haslam that's limited to students from low-income families attending the bottom 5 percent of failing schools. He had that measure withdrawn last year when Senate Republicans sought to expand to a larger number of children.

15. Police, Fire Directors Discuss Budget With Council -

Memphis City Council members got deeper Tuesday, Feb. 4, into the specifics of Memphis Police and Fire Department budget decisions.

But they didn’t get a clearer picture of what the direction forward will be as they and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. prepare to make some hard decisions about public safety in dealing with the city’s unfunded pension liability.

16. Council Hears More on Police and Fire Budget Decisions -

Memphis City Council member got deeper Tuesday, Feb. 4, into the specifics of Memphis Police and Fire Department budget decisions.

But they didn’t get a clearer picture of what the direction forward will be as they and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. prepare to make some hard decisions about public safety in dealing with the city’s unfunded pension liability.

17. Mae Be, Mae Be Not -

MAE BE ONTO SOMETHING. State Sen. Mae Beavers – really, that’s her name – has offered legislation that makes it against the law in Tennessee to obey the law in the United States – really, I couldn’t possibly make that up.

18. Counseling Group Opens for Backlog Rape Victims -

The Shelby County Rape Crisis Center is starting a weekly support group for rape victims whose rape kits were among the 12,000 left untested by Memphis Police Department over a 30-year period.

The announcement of the support group came Tuesday, the same day the Tennessee Legislature convened for the year, with several proposals connected to the scandal expected to at least be debated, if not acted on, during the short election-year session.

19. Lawmakers Reconvene For 108th General Assembly -

State lawmakers on Tuesday reconvened the 108th Tennessee General Assembly in a legislative session that is expected to feature debates over creating a school voucher program and whether to allow supermarkets to sell wine.

20. Debt and Liability -

There is rarely a good answer to the question “How much?” in politics.

With issues including the unfunded pension liability, overall debt, and revenue estimates and their validity, City Hall’s overall money problem begins but hardly ends with the question. It won’t be that simple.

21. Failed Education Bills to Return in New Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Proponents of revamping education laws in Tennessee cite a recent report that ranked the state's students tops in the nation in academic improvement as proof that recent reforms are working and more should be considered.

22. Norris Expects Maintenance of Effort for Pensions -

Tennessee Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville says whatever fix Memphis leaders come up with for the city’s unfunded pension liability, the Tennessee General Assembly will probably still pass legislation dealing with the problem on a scale broader than Memphis.

23. Suburban Voters Decide School Board Races -

Voters in Shelby County’s six suburban towns and cities elected their respective municipal schools boards Thursday, Nov. 7 with low voter turnouts that reflected that most of the school board positions on the ballots were one-candidate uncontested races.

24. Inman Joins Next Day Access as Franchise Manager -

Greg Inman has joined accessibilities solutions provider Next Day Access as franchise manager for the Memphis office, where he will supervise sales, marketing, service management and hiring. Next Day Access offers wheelchair ramps, stair lifts, bathroom safety products and other accessibility products for people with disabilities or accessibility challenges.

25. Attorney General: Haslam Can Appoint Judges Without Finalists -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam can fill vacancies in state trial and appellate court positions without getting a list of finalists from the Judicial Nominating Commission, which went out of existence at the end of June.

26. Norris Elected Chairman of National Council -

Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris has been elected chairman of the national Council of State Governments based in Lexington, Ky.

27. Early Voting Expands in District 91 Primary -

Early voting in the Democratic primary special election for State House District 91 expands Friday, Sept. 27, from the Shelby County Election Commission’s Downtown offices, 157 Poplar Ave., to three satellite locations.

28. Norris Elected Chairman of National Council -

Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris has been elected chairman of the national Council of State Governments based in Lexington, Ky.

29. Filing Deadline Nears for School Board Races -

It looks as if the prospective candidates in many of the suburban school board races on the Nov. 7 ballot had already decided the winners a day away from the noon, Thursday, Sept. 26, filing deadline for the six sets of races.

30. Economist Outlines US Freight Network at Intermodal Conference -

The Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute at the University of Memphis welcomed a distinguished list of guest speakers to its seventh annual Intermodal Freight Conference at the FedEx Institute of Technology Tuesday, Sept. 24.

31. Job Training Spurs Unilever Growth -

The Unilever USA plant in Covington should be the largest ice cream manufacturing plant in the world by 2016, following an $108.7 million expansion announced last week in Covington.

But when the global company began making ice cream in Covington in 2011 at what used to be a SlimFast plant, it was not a promising beginning.

32. Covington Unilever Expansion To Add 428 New Jobs -

Executives of Unilever USA announced Thursday, Sept. 19, their Covington plant will expand to add 428 new jobs at what is already the largest employer in Tipton County.

The $108.7 million expansion will add the jobs over a four year period bringing the plant that makes ice cream products to 1,000 employees.

33. Intermodal Conference to Tackle Freight Issues -

The Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute at the University of Memphis will host its seventh annual Intermodal Freight Conference at the FedEx Institute of Technology on the University of Memphis campus Tuesday, Sept. 24.

34. Gathering Targets Region’s Workforce Development -

When state officials gather at The University of Memphis University Center Wednesday, Sept. 4, to talk about workforce training, it won’t be with a check in hand to lead the effort.

State Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville, who organized the 8:30 a.m. to noon session, wants state labor commissioner Burns Phillips and others from Nashville to listen to details of the training programs local business and higher education leaders have cobbled together over the last three years.

35. LEAP of Faith -

A STEP IN SYNC. I have in my possession a rare document, evidence of a shared spark of hope, a light at the end of all the tunnel vision, a warm fire in that cold cave in Nashville.

I have a letter signed by two gentlemen of color – one black and blue, one white and red – pledging cooperation in a state program that could genuinely and uniquely benefit Memphis rather than target and isolate it. Think of it as Auburn and Alabama, Ole Miss and Mississippi State, Pelosi and Boehner, wet ribs and dry ribs, humans and Klingons – all together to save the universe. I have a letter jointly from and signed by state Sen. Reginald Tate, chair of the Shelby County Legislative Delegation, and state Sen. Mark Norris, Senate majority leader.

36. Conference to Bridge Gap Between Employers, Training Programs -

Out of the near-crisis in hiring workers after the city’s set of economic development plums in the last three years came a workforce training formula that has worked.

But many of the city’s companies aren’t aware of that formula or the existing programs that grew out of what amounted to an emergency response by local leaders. That’s according to a recent survey of manufacturing company leaders by the Greater Memphis Chamber.

37. Advisory Board to Examine Community Health Needs -

Dr. David Stern, executive dean of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine, has launched a unique effort to address community health needs in Memphis.

“It’s my belief that a medical school has a very unique opportunity to interact with the community,” Stern said. “I consider our community to be a very important laboratory – it is an underserved, minority community that is in ill health. The biggest contribution we can make is to move the needle on overall community health and to develop new methods that we can apply to other communities like Memphis.”

38. Advisory Board Formed For UTHSC College of Medicine -

City leaders gathered earlier last week at the Hamilton Eye Institute boardroom at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine over concerns about health care and higher education in Memphis.

The 18 meeting attendees, including Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell, state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, and local CEOs and civic leaders, formed an ongoing advisory board for the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine. The advisory group will provide evidence and value-based approaches to delivering health care to physicians-in-training as well as finding new ways to reach out to the community.

39. Federation of Independent Business Honors Norris -

The National Federation of Independent Business has recognized Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, R-Collierville, with its Guardian of Small Business award for his leadership on a variety of legislative reform efforts.

40. City Budget Woes Affect 400 Employees -

The numbers at play so far in the Memphis City Council’s long budget season are big.

Council members tallied $24.4 million in city operating budget cuts Tuesday, June 18, in a marathon seven-hour session before an overflow crowd of angry city employees.

41. National Federation of Independent Business Honors Norris -

The National Federation of Independent Business has recognized Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, R-Collierville, with its Guardian of Small Business award for his leadership on a variety of legislative reform efforts.

42. Haslam Urges Better GOP Campaign Skills Nationally -

There were no campaign stickers or push cards at the Shelby County Republican Party’s annual Lincoln Day dinner, but still plenty of hand-to-hand campaigning Friday, May 17, among the crowd of 350 at the University of Memphis Holiday Inn.

43. Failed Education Bills on Radar for Next Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – In the last few years, Tennessee hasn't shied away from contentious education initiatives as it seeks to remain at the forefront of education reform in the nation.

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan has even characterized the state's efforts as "courageous leadership."

44. 108th General Assembly Adjourns for Year -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The 108th Tennessee General Assembly adjourned on Friday, the first time in 45 years that lawmakers have finished as early as April in the first year of a session.

Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey had set an adjournment goal of April 18, but he didn't seem upset finishing a day later.

45. Municipal Schools Bill Sails Through House, Senate -

After much speculation about resistance from other parts of the state to lifting the statewide ban on special school districts statewide, the bill to do that sailed through the Tennessee House and Senate Monday, April 15.

46. Push Education Bills in Final Days of Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – As the 108th Tennessee General Assembly draws to a close, state lawmakers are hoping to push through education proposals that include creating a state panel to authorize charter schools for five counties and a measure that would clear the way for cities to begin forming municipal school systems.

47. Animal Abuse Reporting Bill Hits Senate Snag -

An effort to require whistleblowers to quickly submit damning evidence of animal abuse to law enforcement has hit a snag in the state Senate over questions about the true intentions of the bill.

The bill sponsored by Sen. Dolores Gresham of Somerville and fellow Republican Rep. Andy Holt of Dresden would require anyone recording images of animal abuse submit unedited footage or photos to law enforcement within 48 hours.

48. Welfare Penalty for Parents Dead This Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The sponsor of a proposal to dock the welfare payments of parents whose children fail school refused to listen to a little girl opposing the measure Thursday, saying she was being used as a prop.

49. Charter Panel Bill Slowed in Senate -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Lawmakers questioned a proposal to create a special panel to authorize charter schools in several Tennessee counties during debate at the state Legislature Tuesday, while a nonprofit group criticized the governor's decision to withdraw his school voucher program.

50. Georgia Senator Opposed to Border Resolution Cheered -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee lawmakers gave rousing applause to welcome a Georgia senator who opposed a resolution calling for redrawing the border between the two states.

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville introduced Republican Sen. Jeff Mullis of Chickamauga, Ga., during a floor session on Wednesday.

51. Kelsey: State Confirms Six-Year Auto Inspection Timeframe -

Republican state Sen. Brian Kelsey of Germantown says he is confident Shelby County vehicle owners outside Memphis won’t have to go through auto inspections for another six years.

52. Haslam School Voucher Bill Dead This Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The Republican leader carrying Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to create school vouchers in Tennessee said he's decided to let it die this session because he's tired of the "gamesmanship."

53. Bill Would Let Cities Form Own School Systems -

Legislation that would allow cities to form their own school systems is advancing in the Senate.

The measure sponsored by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville unanimously passed the Senate Education Committee on Wednesday.

54. Bill Would Let Cities Form Own School Systems -

Legislation that would allow cities to form their own school systems is advancing in the Senate.

The measure sponsored by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville unanimously passed the Senate Education Committee on Wednesday.

55. The Means to be Mean -

PIECE OF CAKE. Lately, and this is disturbing, I’ve been thinking about Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, as Marie Antoinette, complete with a powdered wig and a cute little stick-on beauty mark, running up and down the halls inviting the poor to eat cake when they run out of bread. But these are not the halls of her Petit Trianon in Versailles at the time of the French Revolution. These are the halls of the state capitol in Nashville at the time of the super majority.

56. Bill Would Let Cities Form Own School Systems -

MEMPHIS (AP) – Legislation that would allow cities to form their own school systems is advancing in the Senate.

The measure sponsored by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville unanimously passed the Senate Education Committee on Wednesday.

57. Senate Approves Virtual School Measure -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to tighten enrollment requirements at privately run online schools has passed the Senate.

The measure guided by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was approved 27-2 on Thursday.

58. Haslam's School Voucher Bill Delayed -

NASHVILLE (AP) – State Republicans are trying to decide between two competing proposals that would create a school voucher program in Tennessee.

Gov. Bill Haslam's measure had been scheduled to be heard Wednesday in the Senate Education Committee, but was delayed for two weeks.

59. Senate Majority Leader Norris Files Job Training Bill -

Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, R-Collierville, has filed legislation that would create a new statewide initiative aimed at shoring up workers’ job skills and addressing labor shortages among Tennessee employers.

60. Norris Files Job Training Legislation -

Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, R-Collierville, has filed legislation that would create a new statewide initiative aimed at shoring up workers’ job skills and addressing labor shortages among Tennessee employers.

61. Supermarket Wine Bill Advances by 1 Vote in Senate -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal to allow wine to be sold in Tennessee supermarkets and convenience stores scored its first legislative victory on Tuesday after years of frustration.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee voted 5-4 to advance the bill that would allow cities and counties to hold referendums next year to decide whether to expand wine sales beyond the state's nearly 600 licensed liquor stores.

62. Merger Again Intersects With Nashville -

For a third consecutive year in Nashville, the Shelby County schools merger and the suburban reaction to it are on the calendar of the Tennessee legislature.

As the General Assembly finished its legislative week Thursday, Feb. 14, state Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville introduced several bills, some of them captions to be added to as needed that would make suburban municipal school districts possible.

63. War Within the State -

TENNESSEE HAS DECLARED WAR ON SHELBY COUNTY. We now have renamed three parks. Forrest Park to Health Sciences Park. Confederate Park to Memphis Park. Jefferson Davis Park to Mississippi River Park. The new names are uninspired and uninteresting – they might as well be Boring Park, Bland Park and Whatever Park – but what inspired them is what makes them interesting.

64. Funding Film -

A prominent Republican state senator recently asked the state Department of Economic and Community Development to make sure and take the call if the department gets a ring from Molly Mickler Smith, the daughter of FedEx founder Frederick W. Smith.

65. Signs of the Times -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. called the Electrolux Memphis manufacturing plant a “monster plant” this week after a tour of the $266 million manufacturing center in Frank C. Pidgeon Industrial Park.

66. Back to Work -

The Shelby County legislative delegation to Nashville returned to the capital Tuesday, Jan. 8, with three fewer members – one state senator and two state representatives – all Democrats – but with no new faces.

67. Kyle Wants GOP Senate Caucus Meetings Open -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The top Democrat in the state Senate is calling on Republicans to make the upper chamber of the General Assembly subject to open government laws, saying he wants to see more transparency in government.

68. Calls Come to Change Schools Merger Process -

As suburban mayors were scheduled to meet this week to talk over their options, the consolidation of all public schools in Shelby County that begins in August began to show signs of a shift.

The shift might be to take at least some of the decisions about the schools merger out of the hands of just the countywide school board or to junk the process the board is using. The mayors of the six towns and cities have all indicated they intend to push on for their own school districts, although several have said it is highly unlikely they could form them and open them for classes by August.

69. Obama Carries Shelby, Cohen Over Flinn and Two Tax Hikes Defeated -

President Barack Obama carried Shelby County in unofficial Nov. 6 election returns as his Republican challenger Mitt Romney took the state’s 11 electoral votes.

Voter turnout in the most popular election cycle among Shelby County voters was 61.9 percent, about the same percentage as four years ago. But the 371,256 voters is fewer than 2008 when more than 400,000 Shelby County voters cast ballots. The percentage is about the same because there are fewer registered voters in Shelby County than there were four years ago after a purge by election officials.

70. Decision Day -

The last election of 2012 will be one where questions continue to command as much attention if not more than candidates.

The polls are open Tuesday, Nov. 6, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Voters come to the polls in this election to vote in the presidential general election. That is what drives the only election cycle in which more than half of the county’s registered voters consistently show up.

71. Events -

Cannon Wright Blount will present “Getting Started With QuickBooks: Learn From the Experts” Wednesday, Oct. 10, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at its office 756 Ridge Lake Blvd., suite 100. Cost is $75. Visit cannonwrightblount.com or email quickbooks@cannonwrightblount.com.

72. Schools Fight Looks to Milan System -

The date to a city-county schools merger in Shelby County is less than a year away and the six suburban towns and cities in the county are preparing for Nov. 6 school board elections for their municipal school districts.

73. Norris, Kyle Talk Changing Legislature -

The Democratic and Republican leaders of the state Senate see the politics of the state continuing to change and with it the nature of being the majority and minority parties in the Tennessee Legislature.

74. Suburban School Board Races Almost Set -

Races on the Nov. 6 ballot for six sets of suburban school boards took shape Thursday, Aug. 16, at the noon filing deadline for candidate qualifying petitions.

The candidates that made the deadline have another week to withdraw from the races if they wish.

75. Congestion Woes -

Tennessee Transportation Commissioner John Schroer told the Regional Logistics Council Thursday, Aug. 2, that his office has the “right priority list” of road projects for the Memphis area.

76. Cohen, Hart in Final Preparations for Primary -

Steve Cohen and Tomeka Hart agree that serving in Congress is about relationships, something they each said in separate interviews with The Daily News editorial board.

77. Shelby County’s Early Voting Tops 62K -

As Shelby County Election Commission officials admitted there was a problem with early voting, turnout by early voters soared for the voting period that ended Saturday, July 28, in advance of Thursday’s election day.

78. Hargett: Shelby Election Problems Erode Public Confidence -

The election driven by ballot questions and one-time-only races looks to become an election that goes into overtime as well.

Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett formally asked State Comptroller Justin Wilson Friday, July 27, to audit the administration of the Shelby County Election Commission and investigate election procedures and returns.

79. State Confirms Shelby Election Investigation -

Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett has called for the Tennessee Comptroller to investigate the Shelby County elections and state officials are moving toward the probe as early voting comes to an end Saturday, July 27.

80. Lights, Camera, Action -

The pot of state money available to spur film production in Tennessee got a couple million dollars richer a few months ago.

Thanks to a measure sponsored this past legislative session by state Sen. Mark Norris, R-Collierville, an additional $2 million is now available to incentivize film production in the state. But the good news goes deeper than that seven-figure sum for Tennessee’s film industry.

81. NFIB Endorses State Sen. Norris -

The National Federation of Independent Business has endorsed Mark Norris, R-Collierville, in the 32nd Senate District, which has a primary scheduled for Aug. 2 and the general election to be held Nov. 6.

82. Hit Dogs -

IT’S NOT RACIAL. IF I’M LYING, I’M DYING. We are lying. And if we don’t realize it, we will die from it.

Annie Laurie Peeler put it best. She was, after all, the best sixth grade teacher in the history of the universe. Really. With all due respect to the sixth grade teacher you love, Mrs. Peeler will spot her or him two eyes in the back of her head, three stories you’ll never forget, and four Southernisms and still beat your teacher like a cloakroom paddling.

83. Hart Discusses Congressional Bid With The Memphis News -

Countywide school board member Tomeka Hart talked with The Memphis News editorial board this month about her candidacy in the Aug. 2 Democratic Congressional primary – a challenge of incumbent Congressman Steve Cohen in the 9th District.

84. School Board Moves Toward Superintendent Pick -

At the start of another five-hour countywide school board meeting Tuesday, June 26, Jim Boyd of the schools consolidation planning commission set the stage for a busy night on several fronts.

85. Countywide School Board To Discuss Future Supt. -

When countywide school board members resume a still-preliminary discussion Tuesday, June 19, about who should be superintendent of the merged public school system to come, they will have another opinion to consider.

86. Haslam Signs Trio of Anti-Crime Bills -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam signed a trio of anti-crime measures into law during a Wednesday, June 6, visit to Bartlett.

The laws include an increase in mandatory jail time for repeat domestic violence offenders and a second law upping sentences for convicted felons with guns that include some specific circumstances for longer sentences.

87. Learning From Wrecks -

SPEAKING OF EDUCATION, WE DON’T LEARN. The weight of his robes bearing down, the certain confusion and probable chaos resulting from his next words, the U.S. District judge in Memphis adjusted his glasses, took a deep breath, and changed public education in his hometown forever.

88. Board Representation at Stake in Bill -

In the legislation passed by the Tennessee General Assembly last week allowing suburban referendums this year on forming municipal school districts there was another part of the bill.

And it completes some important terms for the Nov. 6 school board elections that would follow the planned Aug. 2 referendums on forming school districts and levying a half- cent local option sales tax rate increase if voters approve both questions.

89. Muni School District Bill Awaits Decision -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has said he would have preferred some other outcome. But on his desk this week awaiting his decision is the bill that sets the stage for referendums this year in Shelby County’s suburbs on forming municipal school districts.

90. Tenn. Senate Approves Muni Schools Referendums -

The Tennessee State Senate gave final approval Monday, April 30, to legislation that sets the stage for referendums this year in Shelby County’s suburbs on forming municipal school districts.

91. Haslam Cash Grants Plan Passes Senate 29-1 -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's plan to increase the amount of cash grants available to companies looking to invest in Tennessee has passed the Senate.

The measure carried by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was approved 29-1 on Thursday. The companion bill passed the House 96-0 last month.

92. Senate Votes 32-1 to Pass $31B Spending Plan -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Senate has passed its version of Gov. Bill Haslam’s more than $31 billion spending plan, making nearly $60 million in cuts to a number of programs.

93. Tennessee Legislature Could Decide Muni Districts -

This could be the week that the Tennessee Legislature decides the timing of the rise of suburban municipal school districts in Shelby County.

The issue is an amendment to a Senate bill on school bullying that would permit the suburbs to call referendums this year on forming such school districts.

94. Schools Planning Commission Weighs, Rejects Stand on Schools Bill -

The schools consolidation planning commission considered Thursday, April 19, but voted down a resolution that would have urged the Tennessee legislature not to pass the bill that would allow suburban towns and cities to hold referendums this year on forming municipal school districts.

95. What They’re Cooking Isn’t Genuine Gumbo -

IT TAKES OKRA. This Sunday, April 15, Mike Warr has asked me to help judge the gumbo cookoff at the City Auto Rajun Cajun Crawfish Festival, the annual mudbug throwdown to benefit Porter-Leath. Mike started this party when he was at the helm of Captain Bilbo’s 23 years ago, initially ordering 600 pounds of crawfish. Now he heads Porter-Leath, and this year some 20,000 people will be picking away at 16,000 pounds of the little critters.

96. Reactions to Schools Legislation Changing in Nashville -

Tennessee legislators from outside Shelby County got a look at where the Shelby County schools reformation discussion was in January this week on Capitol Hill in Nashville.

And they didn’t like the idea that their counties could be living with Shelby County rules.

97. Municipal Schools Referendums Remain Off 2012 Calendar -

Referendums in the Shelby County suburbs on the creation of municipal school districts remain off the table after the Tennessee House removed an amendment from a bill that would have set the stage for holding the referendums this year.

98. Cohen-Hart in Congressional Race at Filing Deadline -

The chairman of the countywide school board, Billy Orgel, was effectively elected to his District 7 school board seat without opposition at the Thursday, April 5, filing deadline for candidates on the Aug. 2 primary and general election ballot in Shelby County.

99. Muni School Bill Hits Snag in House -

The bill to lift the statewide ban on creating municipal school districts will be back in the Tennessee House Education Committee next week after more last-minute developments including an amendment.

100. Municipal School District Bill Delayed a Week -

The lobbyist for the countywide school board took no position Tuesday, April 3, on state legislation that would lift the statewide moratorium on creation of municipal school districts in January.

And the House Education Committee chairman Richard Montgomery of Sevierville, Tenn., delayed action on the bill for another week after announcing there was a late amendment to the legislation.