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Editorial Results (free)

1. Point in Time -

About three years ago, what amounts to a very informal census of the city’s homeless – those without shelter – counted 259 people, with 135 of them being deemed the most vulnerable for harm if they remained homeless.

2. Luttrell Scolds State Legislators -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell says the political forces that defeated the Insure Tennessee proposal of Gov. Bill Haslam this month in Nashville weren’t in a fight with Washington and President Barack Obama

3. Justin Ford: ‘We’re On The Cusp Of Change’ -

Shelby County commission chairman Justin Ford is running for Memphis Mayor in 2015.

Ford announced his intention to challenge Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. Monday, Feb. 9, joining former county commissioner James Harvey, city council member Jim Strickland, and former University of Memphis basketball player Detric Golden in the growing field.

4. Haslam: "No Regrets" on Insure Tennessee, Problems Still Exist -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam opened his State of the State address Monday, Feb. 9, where the special legislative session on Insure Tennessee ended last week – the defeat in committee of his Medicaid expansion proposal.

5. Haslam: "No Regrets" on Insure Tennessee, Problems Still Exist -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam opened his State of the State address Monday, Feb. 9, where the special legislative session on Insure Tennessee ended last week – the defeat in committee of his Medicaid expansion proposal.

6. Wharton Not Giving Up on Fairgrounds Plan -

Nashville is a more turbulent place than usual these days, especially Capitol Hill. So Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and his administration probably won’t tempt the turbulence there by taking their plan for a Tourism Development Zone to finance a Mid-South Fairgrounds renovation to the Tennessee Building Commission later this month.

7. More Tax Incentive Changes Likely -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell made the argument last week in his State of the County speech that local economic development and economic recovery is not the singular pursuit of jobs.

8. Insure Tennessee: Failure by Politics and Procedure -

The momentum that killed the Insure Tennessee proposal and ended the special session of the Tennessee legislature Wednesday, Feb. 4, was fueled by ideological opposition to the Affordable Care Act and President Barack Obama.

9. Haslam's Insure Tennessee Health Plan Fails in Legislature -

Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans has failed during a special legislative session.

The Senate Health Committee defeated the Republican governor's Insure Tennessee plan Wednesday on a 7-4 vote.

10. Luttrell Warns of Tax Hike Without Insure Tennessee -

Two hours before the state Senate committee vote in Nashville that signaled the death of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Medicaid expansion proposal, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said failure to pass the expansion could mean a county property tax hike to fund Shelby County’s public safety net hospital.

11. Luttrell Warns of Tax Hike Without Insure Tennessee -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell urged Tennessee legislators Wednesday, Feb. 4, to approve the proposed Insure Tennessee Medicaid expansion as the Legislature continues its special session in Nashville on the issue.

12. Commissioners Watching What’s Next for Fairgrounds Plan -

It’s not on the Monday, Jan. 26, agenda of the Shelby County Commission, but commissioners are watching the political dominoes that are lining up en route to some kind of move by the city of Memphis toward a Fairgrounds Tourism Development Zone.

13. Fairgrounds TDZ Agreement Getting Closer -

The deal to win Shelby County government’s backing of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton’s plan for a Fairgrounds Tourism Development Zone is getting more complex.

The latest version outlined Tuesday, Jan. 20, at City Hall still includes a city guarantee to make up any sales tax revenue that would normally go to fund local public schools that might be lost to financing the reconfiguration of the Fairgrounds.

14. Strickland In Mayor's Race, Wharton Responds -

After months of speculation, Memphis City Council member Jim Strickland confirmed Thursday, Jan. 15, he is in the 2015 race for Memphis mayor.

15. County Commission Endorses Haslam Plan -

At the first Shelby County Commission meeting of 2015, all but one of the 13 commissioners voted for a resolution backing Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam’s Medicaid expansion plan, “Insure Tennessee.”

That included some vocal Republican opponents of the Affordable Care Act in general.

16. Memphis Law School, Le Bonheur Team Up -

The University of Memphis Institute for Health Law & Policy and Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital will launch a Healthy Homes Partnership this week, with a kick-off Thursday at 6 p.m. at the law school.

17. Elvis Birthday Proves Eventful on Several Fronts -

Jack Soden, the head of Elvis Presley Enterprises, looked out at a crowd on the front lawn of Graceland last week in single-digit temperatures and talked about the durability of Elvis Presley’s appeal.

18. Strings Come With Fairgrounds Zone -

Shelby County Commissioners could take up an endorsement Monday, Jan. 12, of the city’s proposed Tourism Development Zone for redevelopment of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

But at this point, the backing has a lot of strings attached. And those strings involve two issues related to local schools funding.

19. Dunavant Award Nominations Open -

With Memphis elections on the horizon in another election year, Rotarians are about to begin the process of selecting new winners of the Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

The 12th annual awards that go to one local elected official and one local non-elected public official are a way of not only honoring the late Shelby County Probate Court clerk but also fostering a broader discussion about the nature of public service and specifically local public service.

20. Building the Base -

It was late September, and local officials were deeply engaged with retail giant Target as the company explored investing in an online fulfillment center in Memphis when the discussions turned toward a familiar subject.

21. Big Deals Highlight 2014 Real Estate -

In Inked, we like to highlight local real estate transactions and the often-interesting companies leasing or buying commercial real estate space in the Memphis market. We also like to keep you informed about major deals before they happen and track companies that are critical to the local economy. Here are some important items that appeared in Inked in 2014.

22. County Sees New Faces, New Directions -

There was a lot of moving around in Shelby County government in 2014, much of it the literal kind as the Vasco Smith County Administration Building was remodeled.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell got new offices in the renovation and the Shelby County Commission chambers got an upgrade as well with the commission offices and committee room moving from the fourth floor to the sixth floor.

23. Memphis Resolutions -

The end of the year hastens a season of resolutions about the year ahead, resolutions about what to include on the blank canvas of a new year.

No matter who you are, the road to 2015 starts at the same place – through the experience of 2014. With that in mind, we surveyed many of the people we’ve covered in these pages in the last year to talk about the possibilities ahead.

24. City, County Catch Late-Year Economic Development Surge -

Through September, things were looking somewhat bleak for Memphis and Shelby County on the economic development front.

At that point in the year the city and county were on pace to tie a record low for the number of payments-in-lieu-of-taxes, or PILOT, agreements granted to companies in a year. While granting fewer tax incentives could be viewed as good news because companies were more fiscally sound or confident about operating in Memphis and Shelby County, the lower level of activity represented a dip in the level of economic investment in the area.

25. Wharton Whirlwind -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. will ask the Memphis City Council to approve the approximately $30 million in city funding at the core of the settlement of the six-year-old schools funding controversy and lawsuit.

26. Nations Hired at Sheriff's Office -

Bob Nations, the former director of emergency preparedness for Shelby County, has been hired to work with the county's sheriff's department.

Chip Washington, a spokesman for the Shelby County Sheriff's Office, says Nations is filling the role of chief inspector over schools and crime prevention.

27. A Tale of Two Projects -

At 7.7 miles, it takes about 12 minutes to make the drive between the Mid-South Fairgrounds and Graceland.

However, the political fortunes of each couldn’t be more different.

A financing plan for a long-delayed expansion of the Graceland campus to develop all 120 acres owned by Elvis Presley Enterprises and amassed since the mid-1990s cleared the Shelby County Commission this week and the Memphis City Council a week before.

28. Target Bringing 400-Job Project to Memphis -

Memphis is poised to land hundreds of new jobs and retain several hundred more. Target will seek incentives from Memphis and Shelby County as early as next week for an online fulfillment center that will create over 400 new jobs.

29. Graceland Plan Clears Main Local Hurdles -

Elvis Presley Enterprises attempted to secure private financing of its plan for a 450-room resort hotel and a remake of its plaza area, but those attempts failed, said Graceland’s bond counsel, because it is difficult for borrowers to get conventional financing for a hotel project.

30. Commission Approves Graceland Plan, Delays Fairgrounds TDZ -

Shelby County Commissioners approved the Graceland economic impact plan Monday, Dec. 8, the last local hurdle for a plan that includes the construction of a 450-room hotel and a later phase transforming the Graceland Plaza area across Elvis Presley Boulevard from the Graceland mansion.

31. Nations Hired at Shelby County Sheriff's Office -

Bob Nations, the former director of emergency preparedness for Shelby County, has been hired to work with the county’s sheriff’s department.

Chip Washington, a spokesman for the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office, says Nations is filling the role of chief inspector over schools and crime prevention.

32. Fairgrounds Plan Could Be Tied to Schools -

Shelby County Commissioners are scheduled to vote Monday, Dec. 8, on a contract with city government that is critical to the city advancing its long-held plans for a renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

33. Basar: Fairgrounds Likely to Be Tied to Schools Funding -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar says the commission likely will consider linking an endorsement of the city’s plans for Mid-South Fairgrounds renovation to school funding when it takes up the measure at the Monday, Dec. 8, commission meeting.

34. Building a Framework -

Moving the needle on minority business growth in Memphis is in a phase of knitting and prodding six months after a renewed call for a larger share of business for minority businesses in a city whose population is majority African-American.

35. New Alliance Focuses on Workforce Development -

Memphis and Shelby County are prioritizing workforce development and creating a pipeline that will deliver trained employees to local companies.

The goal is to align educational offerings with the current and future needs of employers.

36. New Alliance Prioritizes Workforce Development -

Memphis and Shelby County are prioritizing workforce development and creating a pipeline that will deliver trained employees to local companies.

The goal is to align educational offerings with the current and future needs of employers.

37. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

38. County Commission to Consider Fairgrounds Deal -

The idea of reconfiguring the Mid-South Fairgrounds as a public recreation area financed by the city of Memphis with sales tax revenue from retail development has come back to life under new terms.

39. Dyer Appointed to Shelby County Attorney Post -

The lead Memphis attorney for the Tennessee Attorney General’s office is the new Shelby County Attorney effective Dec. 1.

Ross Dyer’s appointment was announced Thursday, Nov. 6, by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell, subject to confirmation by the Shelby County Commission.

40. Benson Appointed County Fire Chief -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has appointed the director of the Memphis Fire Department to be the new Shelby County Fire Department chief.

41. City, County Take Different Paths on Insurance -

City of Memphis human resources director Quintin Robinson came from City Hall on the other side of the Main Street Mall last week to watch how Shelby County government handled changes to its health insurance plan for employees.

42. Battle Rages On Between Regional Foes -

In October, Old Dominion Freight Line Inc. opened the door, or 267 doors to be more precise, on its new $30 million service center in Memphis.

43. County Commission Approves Health Insurance Changes -

Shelby County Commissioners approved changes to county government employee health insurance coverage Thursday, Oct. 30, that raises employee premiums by 5 percent and drops working spouses who are offered equivalent coverage of the county’s bronze plan by their employers effective Jan. 1.

44. County Commission to Meet on Health Insurance -

For the second time in a week, Shelby County Commissioners meet Thursday, Oct. 30, to take up changes in health insurance coverage for county government employees.

Commissioners voted at their regular Monday to delay a vote on the changes to get more information.

45. Commission Sets Votes on Health Insurance -

Shelby County Commissioners may not hear a whole lot new in the way of answers between now and a Thursday special meeting to settle the politically volatile issue of changes to health insurance coverage for county government employees.

46. Commission Moves Health Insurance Vote to Thursday -

Shelby County Commissioners moved a critical vote on changing health insurance benefits for county employees to a special Thursday, Oct. 30, meeting in a Monday session dominated by the proposed changes.

47. Incentive Applications Lag Previous Years -

Until a spate of activity this month, Memphis and Shelby County were on pace to tie a record-low for the number of payment-in-lieu-of-taxes agreements granted to companies in a year.

Through September, the city-county Economic Development Growth Engine, the primary business incentive body in Memphis and Shelby County, had awarded just four PILOTs, tied with 2006 for the lowest amount of PILOTs issued in a year since 2002.

48. County Charts Quieter Course On Insurance -

With less than two weeks to the open enrollment period for county employees, Shelby County Commissioners take a look at changes to county employee health care benefits Wednesday, Oct. 22, in committee sessions.

49. Shelby County Inmate to be Honored for Rescue -

A Shelby County jail inmate will be honored for rescuing a woman who was involved in a car crash.

County officials say Tyteaddis Johnson was serving jail time for aggravated burglary when he was assigned to a grass-cutting crew near Memphis International Airport on July 21.

50. Luttrell Appoints Two Division Directors -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has appointed Dale Lane as the county’s new director of the Office of Preparedness and Martha Lott as the county’s new director of Community Services.

51. Luttrell Appoints Two Division Directors -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has appointed Dale Lane as the county’s new director of the Office of Preparedness and Martha Lott as the county’s new director of Community Services.

52. Office of Preparedness Director Leaves -

Bob Nations is leaving the Shelby County Office of Preparedness, part of second-term changes by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

53. Last Day for Shelby County Emergency Chief -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Shelby County emergency management chief Bob Nations says he is not being re-appointed by Mayor Mark Luttrell to the position.

54. Cummins Eyes Memphis Site for Expansion -

Cummins Inc. is eyeing a Memphis property for a planned expansion of the company’s distribution operations, a move that would be welcome news for Memphis officials.

55. County Commission Approves $120 Million in Bonds to Come -

Shelby County Commissioners began the process of issuing $120 million in construction bonds Monday, Sept. 22, approving the initial resolution for the general obligation bonds including ones for school construction.

56. Pre-K’s Place -

It isn’t an application for federal pre-kindergarten funding the state filed earlier this month in Washington, the office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam emphasizes.

“It’s a note of intent to apply,” said Dave Smith, Haslam’s communications chief, last week.

57. Haslam Swears In Judges, Gets Flu Shot in Memphis -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam swore in a new Tennessee Supreme Court justice and two state Appeals Court judges during a busy Friday, Sept. 19, visit to Memphis that also included getting a flu shot.

Haslam swore in Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Holly Kirby of Memphis at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law before a group of 300 people that included former Gov. Don Sundquist, who appointed Kirby to the court of appeals during his two terms as governor.

58. County Commission Starts School Bond Process -

Shelby County Commissioners vote Monday, Sept. 22, on a resolution that is the first step in issuing $120 million in general obligation bonds over the next two years to finance “public works projects, including schools,” according to the resolution.

59. Officials Vow to Help Cargill Workers Find Jobs -

The Greater Memphis Chamber says it will work with its partners to help displaced Cargill Inc. employees find new jobs.

60. Cargill to Close Memphis Corn Mill -

Cargill Inc. will close its Memphis corn mill in January, a move that will impact 440 employees.

The company said the closure of the facility resulted from the underutilization of the Memphis plant on Presidents Island and its location far away from the Corn Belt. The nearby corn oil refinery that employs 28 people will remain open and operate as a standalone facility, Cargill said.

61. Commission Confirms Luttrell Appointees -

In the first voting meeting of the new four-year term of office, the Shelby County Commission approved Monday, Sept. 8, County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s reappointment of Harvey Kennedy as chief administrative officer, Mike Swift as finance director, Yvonne Matlock as health services director, John Halbert as chief information officer, Tom Needham as public works director and Richard Copeland as director of the city-county Office of Planning and Development. The commission also approved William Gupton as the new director of the county’s corrections division.

62. County Commission Confirms Luttrell Appointees -

In the first voting meeting of the new four-year term of office, the Shelby County Commission approved Monday, Sept. 8, County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s reappointment of Harvey Kennedy as chief administrative officer, Mike Swift as finance director, Yvonne Matlock as health services director, John Halbert as chief information officer, Tom Needham as public works director and Richard Copeland as director of the city-county Office of Planning and Development. The commission also approved William Gupton as the new director of the county’s corrections division.

63. Ford Is New County Commission Chairman In Latest Crossover Trend -

Shelby County Commissioners elected a Democratic chairman Monday, Sept. 8, but for a second consecutive year, that chairman was elected with the support of a majority of the Republicans on the body.

64. County Commission Begins New Term -

Shelby County Commissioners elect a new chairman Monday, Sept. 8, for the next year at the first voting meeting of their four-year term of office.

And their agenda includes votes on appointments by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell to his second-term team of division directors and administrators.

65. Competition Calls -

Economic development and the quality of jobs coming to Shelby County are the dominant issues as county elected leaders begin a new four-year term of office this month.

And there are plenty of indications the local strategy is about to change, or at least shift, in response to the resurgence in manufacturing and distribution in North Mississippi.

66. New Commission Holds First Committee Sessions -

Shelby County Commissioners hold their first committee sessions Wednesday, Sept. 4, in advance of their first voting meeting Sept. 8.

In addition to committee recommendations on tax delinquent property sales, the commissioners will get briefings on the Downtown Memphis Commission, Greater Memphis Chamber, Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau and Economic Development Growth Engine. The committee sessions from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. also include a discussion about who will be chairman of the commission, which includes six new members, and second-term division director appointments by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

67. County Leaders Make Transition to Governing -

For government officials, the oath of office marks the boundary between the ability to get elected and the ability to govern.

But it’s not always apparent to those taking the oath what they have gotten themselves into.

68. Editorial: Some Priorities for Our Newly Elected Officials -

At the outset of a new term of office for the winners in the county general elections of August, we offer a few priorities.

We hope the mayor and county commission can come together in a concerted push for an expansion of Medicaid in Tennessee that so far has been lacking in volume and clarity.

69. Most of Commission to Take Oath Thursday -

After several conflicting announcements, 12 of the 13 Shelby County Commissioners will take the oath of office Thursday, Aug. 28, at 4:30 p.m. at the Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 255 N. Main St.

70. Election Commission Certifies August Vote -

The Shelby County Election Commission certified the August election results Monday, Aug. 25, at the beginning of a week that includes an early oath of office for those elected to county offices on the ballot.

71. School Scores Provide Answers, Create More Questions -

The last phase of the state’s delayed rollout of achievement test scores came and went this week with a blur of percentages for hundreds of schools in Shelby County and explanations of success formulas for elementary and middle school students versus high school students.

72. Marshall County in Running for Cummins Jobs -

Add the burgeoning industrial area in Marshall County, Miss., to the list of communities competing for a significant chunk of the Cummins Inc. jobs that are currently in Memphis.

73. Local Leaders Work to Keep Cummins in Memphis -

Memphis and Shelby County are preparing to fight a border battle with Mississippi to keep hundreds of jobs inside the city.

The state of Mississippi is aggressively courting diesel engine manufacturer Cummins Inc. to move most of its Memphis operations south of the state line to DeSoto County, according to sources familiar with the effort.

74. Harvey Offers Advice to New County Commissioners -

Who swears in the judges who will be swearing in other county leaders later this month when they all begin their terms of office?

That was one of the questions new Shelby County Commissioners had for outgoing commission Chairman James Harvey the day after the election last week.

75. Luttrell: Some Changes Coming in Second Term -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell says there will likely be some “tweaks” to his team and its efforts as he prepares to begin his second and final term as the county chief executive.

76. Democratic Divide Widens in Election Results -

Democrats have retained their seven-vote majority on the new single-district Shelby County Commission that takes office Sept. 1.

That and the re-election victory of Democratic incumbent Cheyenne Johnson in the race for Shelby County Assessor of Property were the only bright spots for a divided local Democratic Party that lost every other countywide partisan elected position to Republicans in the Aug. 7 county general election, just as they lost every countywide position to Republicans four years earlier.

77. Cohen Prevails, Incumbents Dominate -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen held off Thursday, Aug. 7, the most serious electoral challenge he’s faced since winning the Congressional seat in 2006, in the form of attorney Ricky E. Wilkins.

78. Cohen, Luttrell, Weirich, Harris Take Early Vote -

Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen has taken the early vote over challenger Ricky Wilkins in the hard fought Democratic Congressional primary on Thursday’s Shelby County election ballot.

79. Democrats Continue to Talk of Election Problems -

Once all of the votes are counted in Thursday’s election, Shelby County Democratic Party leaders will probably challenge the results or at least point to what they consider to be irregularities.

The claim that documented problems in recent election years are not a thing of the past has been a steady political drumbeat among Democrats in recent weeks.

80. Republicans Rally In Bartlett -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam told a group of several hundred Republicans in Bartlett Monday, Aug. 4, that he would like to see a statewide turnout in the August Republican primaries of 750,000.

Haslam and U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander have been on a statewide bus tour since last week to pump up overall Republican turnout even as they face opposition in the GOP primaries for governor and the U.S. Senate. The goal is to also boost the turnout for Republican candidates in local general election races on the ballot.

81. Multiple Choice -

It could have been an election about the local criminal justice system. The set of once-every-eight-years judicial races was the perfect frame for competitive races for district attorney general and juvenile court judge as the main events.

82. Council Aims to Strengthen Local Medical Device Firms -

Shelby County medical device manufacturers are known for their innovation. But it took about three years of meetings before officially forming the Greater Memphis Medical Device Council this July.

“The industry was not used to coming together and sitting down,” said Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce president John Threadgill. “They’re competitors. And to get competitors in the same room to talk about their issues, there’s some reluctance. But the fact is, they’re all having the same issues. The cat’s out of the bag.”

83. Events -

B.I.G. for Memphis, a business interest group that connects Memphis Police colonels and business leaders, will meet Wednesday, July 30, from 9:45 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Phelps Security, 4932 Park Ave. Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell will present the State of the County. Visit phelpssecurity.com.

84. Registration Could Reflect Suburban Relocation -

When Shelby County’s six new suburban school districts register students on Tuesday, July 29, some of those systems’ superintendents will watch for changes from the numbers of students who pre-registered in the new school systems less than a year ago.

85. Suburban Schools Mark A Week to Debut -

Suburban school leaders drop by the Shelby County Schools data center Monday, July 28, to get their first formal look at achievement test scores for their students during the only year of the Shelby County Schools merger.

86. Events -

The Booksellers at Laurelwood will host “Shots Fired” author C.J. Box for a discussion and signing Monday, July 28, at 6 p.m. at 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit thebooksellersatlaurelwood.com.

87. Discriminate at the Ballot Box -

DISCRIMINATING TASTE. By all means, discriminate. Refuse to accept some prepackaged deal as the best you can do, some label to be the quality test. In the known, look for proven performance from each individual offering, standing alone, not just part of some group menu. In the unknown, demand fresh and bold, the promise of new and interesting interpretations from old and predictable ingredients.

88. Democratic Sample Ballot Omits Some Names -

Not every candidate who claimed the Democratic nomination in the May county primaries is on the Shelby County Democratic Party’s endorsement ballot that hits the streets this week.

With early voting underway in advance of the Aug. 7 election day, the sample ballot does not include Juvenile Court clerk candidate Henri Brooks, Circuit Court clerk nominee Rhonda Banks, Probate Court clerk candidate William Chism and County Clerk nominee Charlotte Draper.

89. Pre-K Funding Approved as Commission Term Nears End -

With two meetings left in their current four-year term, Shelby County commissioners – those going off the body and those remaining – are making final pushes for items on their personal political agendas.

90. Commission Approves $3 Million in Pre-K Funding -

Shelby County Commissioners approved $3 million in county government surplus funds Monday, July 21, from the just-ended fiscal year to fund prekindergarten classrooms in the Shelby County Schools system.

91. County Commission Continues Prekindergarten Debate -

Shelby County Commissioners pick up Monday, July 21, where they left off earlier in the month about a way to fund prekindergarten programs.

The commission faces dueling resolutions, with one setting up further study on an expansion, and the other dedicating $3 million in surplus funds from the just-ended fiscal year and the first $3 million of any surplus from the current fiscal year to Shelby County Schools and the suburban school systems.

92. School Board to Vote on Head Start Contract -

Shelby County Schools board members meet Tuesday, July 15, at 5:30 p.m. at the school board auditorium.

The agenda for the voting meeting, which follows the board’s 4 p.m. work session, includes a vote on a $16.7 million contract for Porter-Leath to manage 12 Head Start sites for the school system in the 2014-2015 school year.

93. Commission Approves $4.37 Property Tax Rate -

The Shelby County Commission approved a $4.37 Shelby County property tax rate Monday, July 7, for the fiscal year that began July 1. The rate is 1 cent lower than the $4.38 rate the commission approved a year ago this month for the just-ended fiscal year.

94. Commission Approves $4.37 Property Tax Rate -

The Shelby County Commission approved a $4.37 Shelby County property tax rate Monday, July 7, for the fiscal year that began July 1. The rate is 1 cent lower than the $4.38 rate the commission approved a year ago this month for the just-ended fiscal year.

95. Commission To Hold Brooks Hearing, Sets Standardized Property Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners agreed Monday, to make their own determination about the residency of commissioner Henri Brooks probably toward the end of July in a proceeding that one commissioner described as a “question and answer session.”

96. Commission Takes Final Votes on Tax Rates -

Shelby County Commissioners close out their budget season Monday, July 7, by making a decision on two competing county property tax rate proposals – both lower than the current $4.38 rate.

The commission meets at 1:30 p.m. at the Vasco Smith Administration Building, 160 N. Main St.

97. Timing Key Element of County Tax Rate Debate -

More funding from Shelby County government for prekindergarten classrooms is a matter of timing, say those on both sides of the property tax rate question on which the $2.8 million in additional funding hinges.

98. New Nonprofit Charts Role in Blight Fight -

The bulldozer went straight for the leasing office of the former Spanish Oaks apartments on Cazassa Road near Memphis International Airport.

Meanwhile another bulldozer across the two-lane road was deep into demolishing a set of buildings in the old Winchester Park apartments.

99. Sheriff’s Race Reflects Different Law Enforcement Cultures -

Bennie Cobb remembers how he got his first job in the local criminal justice system.

It was 1980, and Cobb – then 19 years old – went to apply for a job at the old City Jail.

100. Chism Picnic Reflects Summer Campaign Tone -

From the stage at County Commissioner Sidney Chism’s annual political picnic Saturday, June 21, you could almost see the Aug. 7 election day.