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Editorial Results (free)

1. Brewery Project Looks for Answers -

When the Untapped event at the Tennessee Brewery ends June 1, the fortress-like landmark on the south bluffs will still be tentatively slated for demolition in August.

But organizers of the event, which mixes live entertainment, local beer and food, and the experience of gathering in a long-closed courtyard, hope some answers will have emerged about a possible life beyond August.

2. Museum Reopening Raises Issues About Present -

There was a moment in the April 5 two-hour reopening ceremony for the renovated National Civil Rights Museum that demonstrated the tension that still exists when it comes to the important issue of who is telling the story of history.

3. Experts Highlight Health Care Game-Changers -

Both before the Affordable Care Act became law and after, consumers viewed health care costs differently than they do other costs.

So said Dr. Scott Morris during a panel discussion at The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc.’s Health Care Reform seminar Thursday, April 3, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

4. Bares: EPIcenter Effort Targets ‘Scalability’ -

It’s all about “scalability” when it comes to creating new businesses in Memphis, and that means creating ones with a reach beyond the city to customers in other places – customers that more often than not are other businesses, not consumers.

5. School Board to Vote on $52.6 Million Capital Funding -

Shelby County Schools board members take up a $52.6 million capital funding request Tuesday, March 25, that superintendent Dorsey Hopson would take to the Shelby County Commission for funding.

And the board votes as well Tuesday on setting attendance zones for the school year that begins in August – the first school year of the demerger into six suburban school systems as well as a Shelby County Schools system that becomes the city of Memphis and the unincorporated areas of Shelby County.

6. Shelby County Party Heads Look Ahead to Primaries -

As Shelby County Democrats try to improve on losing every countywide office to Republicans in the 2010 county elections, party leaders are also warning political figures who identify as Democrats not to cross party lines.

7. Wharton: City Must Target ‘Black Boy Crime’ -

As President Barack Obama talked from the East Room of the White House last week about violence and young African-American men and boys, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was among a group of mayors meeting in New Orleans who say they are ready to back a new approach to the problem.

8. Strickland: Shorten Pension Ramp-Up -

The Memphis City Council chairman thinks the city shouldn’t take five or six years to ramp up to an annual pension fund contribution of $100 million but instead do it in two fiscal years.

“I think everyone is in uniform support of fully funding our annual contribution,” council chairman Jim Strickland said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind the Headlines.” “In fact, I don’t think we ought to take six years. I think we ought to take two years. Get it fully funded, whether its $60 million or $100 million.”

9. University of Memphis' Martin Challenges Dropout Premise -

University of Memphis interim President Brad Martin says the premise that students coming out of high school are academically unprepared for higher education may not be as prevalent as it’s believed to be. And he adds that the university’s experience indicates students leave without graduating because of other factors.

10. Haslam: Medicaid Expansion ‘A Clunker’ -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he understands critics of his decision so far not to accept a federally funded expansion of Medicaid in Tennessee. But Haslam said the terms of the increased funding wouldn’t provide better outcomes for users or providers.

11. Luttrell Says Timing Key to Schools Funding -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell refers to the start two years ago of the reformation of local public education as “chaos and confusion.”

12. Detractors Call Ballpark Deal Part of Larger ‘Quagmire’ -

Memphis City Council member Wanda Halbert calls it a “serious quagmire.”

And City Hall probably isn’t out of it with last week’s council approval of the AutoZone Park deal.

“Over the last two years, the mayor has come to the council … and said we are financially strapped,” Halbert said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.” “We’ve got to reduce service, raise taxes. The people are saying how are we consistently finding money to do some of these other projects. But we can’t pave streets like we need to.”

13. Airport Authority CEO Sees Growth in New Reality -

Memphis International Airport is making the transition from an airport with a majority of connecting flights, 90 nonstop destinations, higher fares and less competition to one with more origin and destination traffic, 30 to 35 nonstop destinations and lower fares.

14. Norris Expects Maintenance of Effort for Pensions -

Tennessee Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville says whatever fix Memphis leaders come up with for the city’s unfunded pension liability, the Tennessee General Assembly will probably still pass legislation dealing with the problem on a scale broader than Memphis.

15. Crosstown Effort Shines as Development Example -

Construction documents for the $180 million revitalization of the Crosstown building were scheduled to be finished Friday, Dec. 6, with the project moving toward closing and construction in the next months.

16. Ballpark Deal Back on Council’s Agenda -

After getting a rough reception last week, the deal for the city of Memphis to buy AutoZone Park and the St. Louis Cardinals to buy the Memphis Redbirds baseball team returns to the Memphis City Council Monday, Dec. 9, for a vote.

17. Needs of Homeless Change During Holidays -

The needs of the homeless and the hungry rise in prominence during the holidays.

But those who work with those problems year round are always quick to say the problems are still there after the attention wanders once the holidays are over.

18. Suburban Leaders Turn to Schools Details -

Shelby County Schools board members have schools agreements with suburban leaders in Bartlett, Collierville and Millington on their agenda Tuesday, Nov. 26, a week after approving the same type of agreements with different dollar amounts with Arlington and Lakeland.

19. Elkington, Harris Talk of Beale Street Nonprofit -

The next manager and developer of the Beale Street entertainment district should be a nonprofit entity similar to the Downtown Memphis Commission that focuses on improving the district and planning for its expansion, according to longtime Beale Street developer John Elkington and Memphis City Council member Lee Harris.

20. Overton Square Momentum Connects With History -

If you think Midtown’s recent momentum, particularly in and around Overton Square, is real growth, you are right.

But it is growth in development that Overton Square developer Bob Loeb believes will bring along a denser population in the area.

21. Suburban Mayors, Schools Leader Discuss Negotiations -

Germantown Mayor Sharon Goldsworthy is still “hopeful” that Germantown Elementary, Middle and High schools can remain part of the coming Germantown municipal school district under some kind of negotiated agreement between the Germantown school board and the Shelby County Schools board.

22. Hopson Offers Clues on Suburban Schools Transition -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson says it is looking less likely that the school system will provide support services to the new suburban school districts.

“There was some discussion early on,” Hopson said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.” “But I think as we move forward and some of the talks have happened between the County Commission and the municipal schools … I’m not so certain that there is going to be a wide menu of services that the municipal schools are going to even want. I don’t think we can build a budget around the possibility of sharing services.”

23. Local Health Care Changes Limited So Far, Doctors Say -

The Oct. 1 start of enrollment in health care exchanges may be the most visible part of the Affordable Care Act so far.

But changes to insurance and health care nationally already are about something other than lowering health care costs or widening access to health care and health insurance coverage.

24. Flinn, Whalum Differ on Sales Tax Hike Ballot Question -

To Memphis City Council member Shea Flinn, the only uncertainty about the proposed citywide half-cent sales tax hike on the Nov. 21 ballot is the outcome of the vote.

To former Shelby County Schools board member Rev. Kenneth Whalum, nothing in the ballot question comes close to assuring the money will cover prekindergarten expansion costs the tax is supposed to guarantee.

25. Shelby Farms Road Reflects New Realities -

Eight years ago, environmental groups reached a consensus that a single north-south road through Shelby Farms Park was unavoidable and should be pushed as far west in the park as possible.

26. City Leaders Outline Pension Crisis Talks -

There still isn’t an agreement on the numbers. But the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. met late last week with leaders of the unions representing city employees about the conclusion in a consultant’s report that the city’s pension fund liability is unsustainable to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars.

27. Coopwood Lays Out Future of Health Care -

Health care was the hot topic Thursday, Sept. 19, as nearly 150 people gathered in the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art auditorium to discuss the current landscape and impending changes in that field.

Health Care: The State of the Industry – one of six seminars in The Daily News’ 2013 Seminar Series – attracted a variety of professionals, most of them from outside the medical realm. They included lawyers, architects, administrative professionals, Realtors, assisted-living specialists and bankers, among others, and most of them were eager to learn more about the Affordable Care Act and how it would affect them. Others came to be inspired.

28. Questions Raised About Criminal Justice System -

Shelby County’s public defender and the head of the Shelby County Corrections division say courts and prisons are changing and evolving as views about crime and punishment begin to change.

But Public Defender Stephen Bush and County Corrections Division director James Coleman said the intervention needs to start before citizens come into contact with the criminal justice system.

29. Prosecutors: Federal Shift Underway in County -

The historic shift in criminal justice philosophy by U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and President Barack Obama’s administration reflects the direction in which state and federal prosecutors in Shelby County already have been heading for several years.

30. City Sanitation Changes Start With Fragile Pact -

Changes in city sanitation services would move toward a plan that could change decades of a system in which anything Memphians put by the curb gets picked up for a monthly solid waste fee, no matter how much is on the curb.

31. Legislature to Explore Annexation Votes -

The Tennessee legislature has put a moratorium on annexations, and even if the moratorium wasn’t in place, the Memphis City Council hasn’t been anxious to annex any territory beyond South Cordova for several years.

32. Business Leaders Say Tax Incentive Process is Tough -

It still takes too long to make a deal to move a business to Memphis with tax incentives, but without them, Memphis can’t compete with tax rates in other cities in the Southeast U.S., according to two local business leaders.

33. Bunker, Ritz Differ on Tax Hike Afterlife -

Two Shelby County Commissioners with about a year left in office see an afterlife of issues with the county budget and $4.38 property tax rate the commission approved earlier this month.

But Wyatt Bunker and commission Chairman Mike Ritz differ on what the tax rate decision in particular says about the financial direction of county government and what taxpayers can bear.

34. Improving Real Estate Metrics Offer Hope -

The 2013 countywide reappraisal resulted in a historic drop in property values, but improving real estate metrics are providing a glimmer of hope for the local economy.

That was the message industry professionals heard Thursday, July 25, at real estate information company Chandler Reports’ 2013 Mid-Year Master Your Market seminar at the Memphis Marriott East.

35. Real Estate Trends Focus of ‘Master Your Market’ -

Real estate industry professionals will have the opportunity this week to learn more about major trends in the local real estate market, including residential and commercial sales, new housing, foreclosures and lending practices.

36. Suburbs See Different Sales Tax Realities -

While Shelby County and city of Memphis government leaders have grappled with the loss of property value and its impact on the property tax rates for both governments, suburban leaders have a different reality.

37. Wharton Says Budget Challenges Continue -

After taking heavy criticism during the budget season from Memphis City Council members, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is starting to take more criticism for the approved cuts that are rolling out first in the Memphis Fire Department.

38. Wharton Fires Back at Budget Critics -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. said some critics of cuts this week in the Memphis Fire Department are the same Memphis City Council members who were critical of his administration for not cutting enough during the just-ended city budget season.

39. Events -

The American Payroll Association Memphis chapter will meet Thursday, July 11, at 11:30 a.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. Mario Musarra, past president of the Memphis Society for Human Resource Management, will discuss employee classifications and the Fair Labor Standards Act. Cost is $20 for members and $30 for nonmembers. Visit memphisapa.org.

40. Events -

The Project Management Institute Memphis chapter will meet Wednesday, July 10, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at DoubleTree Hotel, 5069 Sanderlin Ave. Bob Mahler, consultant for the U.S. Deparment of Homeland Security, will present “Common Sense Risk Management.” Registration, which includes dinner, begins at 5:45 p.m. Cost is $20 at the door. Visit pmimemphis.org.

41. Events -

The Booksellers at Laurelwood will host the Eating Greek Wine & Food Tasting Tuesday, July 9, at 6:30 p.m. at The Booksellers Bistro, 387 Perkins Road Extended. The meal will include traditional Greek foods paired with wines. Cost is $25; space is limited. R.S.V.P. to 374-0881.

42. 'Cycle Tracks' Latest Bike Initiative for City -

As the $33 million Main Street to Main Street project unfolds, the term “cycle track” is sure to be heard more.

A cycle track is a bicycle lane on a street that is shielded or separated from auto traffic by some kind of barrier or wall.

43. Events -

National Hispanic Professional Organization-Memphis will meet Thursday, July 11, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Hilton Memphis, 939 Ridge Lake Blvd. Nancy Coffee, president and CEO of the New Memphis Institute, will speak. Cost is free for members and $20 for nonmembers. R.S.V.P. to info@nhpomemphis.us or 466-6476.

44. Strickland, Conrad Warn of Budget Pitfalls -

When most of the 13 people on the Memphis City Council began their service in 2008, the city’s property tax rate was $3.43 and rolling back that rate was a priority of a voting majority on the body.

45. Economic Survey Seeks Input From Memphis Businesses -

With the second quarter drawing to a close, The Daily News is encouraging members of the Memphis business community to take part in a new feature intended to be a forward-looking measure of business sentiment.

46. Cohen Expresses Doubts Over NSA Claims -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen doesn’t remember the National Security Agency and intelligence officials briefing Congress on their gathering of telephone and email records and the tracking of the communications of millions of American citizens. But he has his doubts because he says the agencies involved routinely lie.

47. Five Years in the Life -

Delta Airlines and Northwest Airlines has just merged with more than 150 flights a day at Memphis International Airport shifting to the Delta brand. And Delta’s CEO, Richard Anderson, said Memphis would be an integral hub with more traffic.

48. Educators Stress Consistency Amid Change -

Three educators who have led schools inside and outside the conventional public school system locally say consistency at the school level will be important in a school year that will see a lot of change.

49. Luttrell: School Finances Will Continue to Change -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell won an important Shelby County Commission vote last week when the commission approved the $4.38 county property tax rate he recommended.

50. Daily News, Dixon Hughes Goodman Unveil Business Sentiment Survey -

The Daily News has teamed up with one of the largest CPA firms based in the Southeast to launch a new feature that will complement the data-focused snapshots of business activity the newspaper publishes each quarter.

51. Wharton Points to Decisions Beyond Budget Dilemma -

The city of Memphis debt issues that prompted a critical report from the Tennessee comptroller’s office stem from the city’s 2010 decision to refinance the city’s debt and push it further out instead of dealing with it then, says city finance director Brian Collins.

52. Bunker, Hart Clash on Merger Future -

One of the most vocal critics of the countywide school board’s $1.18 billion budget proposal says the schools merger is imposing a failed education formula on legacy Shelby County Schools.

“Why is it that Shelby County Schools can provide more teachers, better salaries for their principals and so forth – they can provide more of that than Memphis (City Schools) can with more money?” Shelby County Commissioner Wyatt Bunker asked. “That is the failure of the school board that Tomeka (Hart) served on to do what needed to be done years and years and years ago.”

53. Property Tax Complicates Sales Tax Considerations -

Whether it is a tax hike or a tax rate hike, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s proposed 28-cent increase in the city property tax rate has complicated the idea of a half-percent city sales tax hike to go on the ballot later this year if the property tax hike sticks.

54. Hopson Says Merger Not Reason for Staff Cuts -

The interim superintendent of Shelby County’s two public school systems says staffing changes at some schools to start with the first school year of the merger aren’t as draconian as they could have been.

55. Kyle, Kelsey Debate Health Care, Government’s Role -

State Senate Democratic leader Jim Kyle of Memphis says Republicans in the Tennessee General Assembly are becoming like “Dixiecrats” – the Southern segregationist Democrats in the U.S. Congress in the late 1940s who formed their own party for a time.

56. Suburban Mayors Preach Patience to Parents -

Suburban leaders are counseling patience among parents of children in their communities who will be part of the coming merger of the county’s two public school systems.

And they will start moving in May on the process of forming municipal school districts for the 2014-2015 school year.

57. City Labor Talks Head to Impasse -

The city of Memphis and the Memphis Police Association are expected to declare Tuesday, April 16, that their contract talks are at an impasse, triggering a process in which the Memphis City Council settles the labor dispute.

58. Kelsey: State Confirms Six-Year Auto Inspection Timeframe -

Republican state Sen. Brian Kelsey of Germantown says he is confident Shelby County vehicle owners outside Memphis won’t have to go through auto inspections for another six years.

59. Health Care Challenge -

To cap off National Public Health Week, The Daily News held an in-depth discussion about health care reform and the daunting task of trying to digest and comprehend the new Affordable Care Act, which encompasses more than 2,800 pages of law and more than 100,000 pages of regulations and rules.

60. Lendermon Discusses Riverfront Access -

Riverside Drive could work well if it lost a lane of automobile traffic in each direction, says the president of the Riverfront Development Corp.

61. Sammons Seeks Final Cut Numbers From Delta -

Jack Sammons, the new chairman of the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority board, is no stranger to the flight from Memphis to Atlanta. Sammons long has been the board’s frequent flyer when it comes to business travel.

62. Whalum, Woods Differ on Schools Mediation -

Two countywide school board members who ran against each other for the same seat on the school board last year agree that the 23-member board is doing the best it can to make decisions about the schools merger.

63. Flinn, Harris Talk Schools Funding Prospects -

For several weeks, it has been an undercurrent feeding the roots of the various branches of the tree that is the Shelby County schools merger.

The thought is that the city of Memphis will come up with some amount of funding for the consolidated school district once the schools consolidation crosses over into the new fiscal year that starts July 1.

64. Ritz, McDonald Clash on Suburban Schools Talks -

The Shelby County Commission and the county’s suburban mayors agree in writing and in a court proceeding on something related to schools.

But that remains the exception to the rule, particularly on issues beyond the first year of the schools merger – namely separate suburban school systems.

65. Barbic Says Coexistence at Humes Possible -

The superintendent of the state-run Achievement School District believes there is room at Humes Middle School for an optional school and the ASD charter school now at Gordon Elementary School.

66. Schools Merger Issues Moving on Several Fronts -

The schools merger issue is moving again on several fronts less than six months before the first school year of the consolidation begins.

The movement began with the release of a preliminary schools budget for the first year of the merger that shook many county and city schools parents out of the mindset that the merger would mean few changes at the school level.

67. Hart To Explore Schools Merger Delay -

Countywide school board member Tomeka Hart will offer a resolution at a school board meeting Monday, Feb. 18 that could call for a one year delay in the scheduled July 1 merger of the city and county school systems.

68. Seminar: Uncertainty Pervades Real Estate -

2013 will be a big year on many real estate fronts – foreclosures, property taxes and property values.

That was the message industry professionals heard Thursday, Feb. 14, at real estate information company Chandler Reports’ 2012 year-end “Master Your Market” seminar at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis.

69. Seminar to Tackle Reappraisal, Consolidation -

Real estate industry professionals will soon have the opportunity to learn more about two ongoing issues that will affect every homeowner and taxpayer – the 2013 Shelby County reappraisal and the school consolidation.

70. Cash Talks of ‘Perfect Storm’ During Reform -

Kriner Cash says there were big “distractions” that began just before he became Memphis City Schools superintendent four-and-a-half years ago that created a “perfect storm” for his efforts to “transform” the school system.

71. Kelsey Discusses School Vouchers Bill -

The bill to come in the Tennessee Legislature that permits school vouchers will be built around the more than $9,000 in state funding per school child, in the case of Memphis, and the ability of parents to use it to move their child to a private school.

72. Is Grizzlies’ Best Behind Them or Yet to Come? -

Is the Grizzlies’ potential not-yet-realized or grossly overestimated? That’s the only relevant question in the midst of Rudy Rumors, speculation about coach Lionel Hollins’ long-term future with the team, and the level of commitment new ownership is or isn’t willing to make in the here and now to this particular roster.

73. Conrad, Flinn Pitch Cost-Saving Measures for City -

Memphis City Council member Kemp Conrad wants to explore selling city assets, including Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division, and using the proceeds to establish a trust fund for early childhood education and other “wrap around” social services.

74. Greenline to Keep Growing in 2013 -

In the coming year, the Shelby Farms Greenline could move a bit farther west from Tillman Street, where it now ends, to the Poplar Avenue viaduct with a goal of linking up with the Broad Avenue Arts District.

75. Huffman Brings Leverage to Possible Mediation -

Tennessee Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman would bring lots of political leverage with him should he mediate the coming merger of schools in Shelby County.

76. Differences Discussed as Schools Move Ahead -

Students and public schools in Shelby County’s six suburban towns and cities are almost certainly going to be part of the consolidated Shelby County public school system that debuts in August.

77. Reardon Speaks Out Against City’s Approach to Housing -

The University of Memphis professor leading the resistance to a still-forming plan to demolish the city’s last large public housing project says the city’s approach to transforming public housing since the late 1990s hasn’t worked.

78. City Could Reconsider Sales Tax Hike -

Just days after voters in Memphis and unincorporated Shelby County voted down the idea of a half-cent countywide sales tax hike, there was renewed talk at Memphis City Hall about a citywide sales tax hike.

79. School Board Members Look to Post-Election Direction -

Once the winners are certified in the six sets of suburban school board races on Tuesday’s ballot in Shelby County, the first order of business for all of the boards will be selecting superintendents to run the six fledgling school systems.

80. School Board to Vote on Supporting Tax Hike -

The chairman of the Shelby County Commission and the newest county commissioner have different thoughts on the countywide tax hike on the Nov. 6 ballot.

But chairman Mike Ritz and commissioner Steve Basar, elected to the commission in August, agree that the countywide school board hasn’t been aggressive enough in carrying out the transition to the schools merger to come in August.

81. ‘Behind the Headlines’ Explores Fixes for County’s Election Woes -

Some early voters in Shelby County are snapping pictures of their completed ballots with their phones to verify their votes. Other voters are delaying their trip to the polls because they anticipate problems in the opening days of the voting period that ends Nov. 1.

82. Daunting Vision -

To say the team behind the redevelopment of the nearly 20-year-vacant Sears, Roebuck & Co. Retail and Catalog distribution facility in Midtown’s Crosstown neighborhood has their work cut out for them would be an understatement at best.

83. Armstrong Talks About Start to Police Tenure -

Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong counted it as a good weekend this month when a guns for gas program drew a larger crowd than expected and a haul of 500 guns when he and organizers had expected maybe 200 at the most.

84. Hospitals Must Prepare for Shifting Model -

A new model for health care in America is rapidly on its way, according to the chief medical officer of Saint Francis Healthcare. And many physicians are oblivious to it or in denial.

85. Daily News Seminar Looks at Health Care Reform Impact -

Changes in the model and delivery of health care and its potential impact on businesses and their employees will take center stage Thursday, Sept. 20, at the latest seminar presented by The Daily News.

86. 'Behind The Headlines' Changes Broadcast Time -

“Behind the Headlines,” the WKNO TV show hosted by Eric Barnes, publisher of The Daily News, is moving to a 7 p.m. airing on Channel 10 starting Sept. 21.

87. Luttrell: Merger Process Must Move Faster -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell says the countywide school board isn’t moving fast enough on the transition to the August 2013 merger of Shelby County’s two public school system.

88. Business of Health Care Topic of Seminar -

In terms of national policy discussion, the current changes in the model and delivery of health care remains among the most heated and complicated of topics.

And on Thursday, Sept. 20, a panel of local experts assembled by The Daily News will participate in an in-depth discussion about the health care industry, including challenges, opportunities and the outlook through 2013.

89. WKNO 'Newsmakers' Features Kernell, Marrero -

The two Tennessee legislators from Shelby County who lost re-election bids in the Aug. 2 elections are the guests Wednesday, Aug. 29, on the WKNO-TV program “Newsmakers.”

State Rep. Mike Kernell and state Sen. Beverly Marrero will talk with host Eric Barnes, publisher of The Daily News, about their careers in Nashville and how they got involved in politics.

90. Events -

Talk Shoppe and the Small Business Chamber will present “The Mastermind Principle: Based on the Book ‘Think and Grow Rich’” Wednesday, Aug. 29, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the Better Business Bureau, 3693 Tyndale Ave. Cost is free. Visit talkshoppe.biz.

91. Events -

The Society for Human Resource Management Memphis chapter ethics council will hold a Dutch treat breakfast Tuesday, Aug. 28, from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Treetops Cafe at International Paper, 6400 Poplar Ave., tower 3, room 100. The topic is “You’ve Got a Code … Now What? Training Your Employees.” Cost is $5. R.S.V.P. to cynthia@hrprosmemphis.com.

92. Seminar Shows Businesses How To Be Green -

Solar panels, wind turbines and electric or hybrid vehicles get much of the attention when conversations turn to sustainability or going green.

But for many businesses large and small, energy efficiency is the first shade of green – and the easiest way to help the bottom line.

93. Hart Discusses Congressional Bid With The Memphis News -

Countywide school board member Tomeka Hart talked with The Memphis News editorial board this month about her candidacy in the Aug. 2 Democratic Congressional primary – a challenge of incumbent Congressman Steve Cohen in the 9th District.

94. AIRfair? -

Two frequent-flyer businessmen booked side-by-side seats on Delta Air Lines flights from Minneapolis to St. Louis last month, with one of them getting charged a higher price than the other each time they tried booking it.

95. Conspiracy Theory -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tennessee joined 14 other states along with the U.S. Justice Department in suing Apple Inc. and major book publishers Wednesday, alleging a conspiracy to raise the price of electronic books they said cost consumers more than $100 million in the past two years by adding $2 to $5 to the price of each e-book.

96. Trane Signs Lease on Tradeport Drive -

Trane U.S. Inc. has finalized its 625,000-square-foot industrial lease in Southeast Memphis after the deal process initially began in January 2011.

97. Appraisal Institute Installs Officers -

The Memphis chapter of the Appraisal Institute held its annual officer installation Dec. 8, during its holiday celebration at the historic Daisy Theatre Downtown. The organization’s 2010 National President Leslie Sellers conducted the ceremony.

98. WKNO's 'Newsmakers' Series to Feature Sen. Mark Norris -

WKNO-TV will premiere a new edition of “Newsmakers,” featuring a conversation with state Sen. Mark Norris, on Wednesday, Dec. 14, at 6:30 p.m. on Channel 10.

It will repeat at 11 p.m. on WKNO2, available over the air on Channel 10.2 and on Comcast digital cable channel 910.

99. Recorded History -

It began as a handwritten single piece of paper hand-delivered to 25 people in what was once the city of Memphis.

It was 125 years ago that the publication now called The Daily News was founded.

100. TDN Preps For 125th Anniversary Celebration -

The city’s oldest locally owned media outlet will celebrate 125 years of Memphis news coverage with an anniversary celebration at Memphis Botanic Gardens’ Hardin Hall on Nov. 1.

The evening event will feature cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and live music, and guests will be invited to explore the newspaper’s rich legacy through a timeline that began in 1886, including front pages dating back to the 1920s.