» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation Links
Search results for 'David Kennedy' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:24
Shelby Public Records:47
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:22
Middle Tennessee:553
East Tennessee:47
Other:1

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Spillyards Leads Community Advisors Launch -

Greg Spillyards has joined the brokerage team at Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors to launch the firm’s Community Advisors service line.

Community Advisors is focused on the Memphis city core, with a goal to provide real estate advisory services to assist in the revitalization of the city’s underserved areas with passion, creativity and entrepreneurship, and with service to those already living and leading in their neighborhoods.

2. Lee Joins MOGA’s DeSoto Office -

Dr. Daniel Lee has joined the DeSoto office of Memphis Obstetrics & Gynecological Association PC. Lee provides comprehensive women’s health services, including office gynecology, obstetrics and surgical management, to women of all ages.

3. Ford Is New County Commission Chairman In Latest Crossover Trend -

Shelby County Commissioners elected a Democratic chairman Monday, Sept. 8, but for a second consecutive year, that chairman was elected with the support of a majority of the Republicans on the body.

4. High-Flying Vols Can’t Overlook Arkansas State -

KNOXVILLE – You had to be hiding under a rock not to hear the buzz this week about the University of Tennessee’s football team.

One person not reveling in the Vols’ 38-7 season opening victory over Utah State on Sunday night was UT coach Butch Jones.

5. US Won't Reveal Records on Health Website Security -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After promising not to withhold government information over "speculative or abstract fears," the Obama administration has concluded it will not publicly disclose federal records that could shed light on the security of the government's health care website because doing so could "potentially" allow hackers to break in.

6. Supreme Court: Religious Rights Trump Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sharply divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, the first time the high court has declared that businesses can hold religious views under federal law.

7. Baseball Gives Rebels Realistic Championship Shot -

OXFORD, Miss. – With breakthrough success comes the luxury of laughter, and the breathing room that allows Ole Miss baseball coach Mike Bianco to say that reaching the College World Series took longer than he imagined.

8. Harris Files Ford Challenge at Deadline -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris is challenging Democratic state Sen. Ophelia Ford in the August primary for District 29, the Senate seat held by a member of the Ford family since 1975.

9. Court Weighs Securities Fraud Case Changes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court on Wednesday seemed open to the possibility of making it harder for investors to join together to sue corporations for securities fraud – but maybe not as hard as companies that have to defend such lawsuits would like.

10. Commission Debates Pay for County Offices -

Shelby County Commissioners appear to have another deadlock similar to the one that spilled over from 2011 into 2012 on drawing new district lines for the 13-member body.

This time the issue is what to pay those holding six countywide elected offices once all of the votes are counted next August in the county general elections.

11. County Commission Approves Three More Schools Pacts -

Shelby County Commissioners on Monday, Dec. 2, approved agreements for suburban school districts in Millington, Collierville and Bartlett, with little discussion at a special meeting of the body.

The commission approved similar agreements with elected leaders in Arlington and Lakeland in November.

12. Commission Begins Debate on Pay for Elected Offices -

Shelby County Commissioners voted Monday, Nov. 18, to keep their annual pay at $29,100 for the term of office that begins Sept. 1, 2014, after the August county general elections.

The ordinance passed on the first of three readings.

13. Commission Considers County Pay Raises -

Shelby County Commissioners take up proposed pay raises Monday, Nov. 18, for the offices of Shelby County mayor, Shelby County sheriff and four other countywide elected officials.

The commission votes on the first of three readings, which also includes an ordinance to keep the pay of Shelby County Commissioners at $29,100 a year.

14. APNewsBreak: Effort Building to Change US Pot Laws -

SEATTLE (AP) – An effort is building in Congress to change U.S. marijuana laws, including moves to legalize the industrial production of hemp and establish a federal pot tax.

While passage this year could be a longshot, lawmakers from both parties have been quietly working on several bills, the first of which Democratic Reps. Earl Blumenauer of Oregon and Jared Polis of Colorado plan to introduce Tuesday, Blumenauer told The Associated Press.

15. Commission to Disband Schools Capital Needs Group -

Shelby County Commissioners vote Monday, Jan. 28, on disbanding the nearly 10-year-old Needs Assessment Committee that advised the commission on funding school construction and renovation projects across both public school systems.

16. Baker Donelson Adds Five Attorneys in Memphis -

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz PC has added five attorneys to its Memphis office.

They are Luke Cantrell, Kristin Clay Dunavant, William O’Connor, Sarah Pazar and Mary Wu.

17. Airports and Stock Exchange Reopen After Superstorm Sandy -

NEW YORK (AP) – Two major airports reopened and the New York Stock Exchange got back to business Wednesday, while across the river in New Jersey, National Guardsmen rushed to feed and rescue flood victims two days after Superstorm Sandy struck.

18. Bankruptcy Judgeship Bill Passed In Congress -

Congress has passed a bill that will allow a bankruptcy judgeship in Jackson, Tenn., to be filled after the retirement this summer of U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge G. Harvey Boswell.

19. Export Growth Earns Mallory ‘E’ Star Award -

Mallory Alexander International Logistics has capped eight years of successive export growth with the President’s “E” Star award to go with the Presidential "E" award the company earned in 2006

20. West Tenn. Bankruptcy Judge Retires -

Everybody is having to do more with less these days – including bankruptcy judges in one of the busiest areas of the country in terms of bankrupt debtors.

U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge G. Harvey Boswell has announced his retirement effective July 8. Boswell’s court is in Jackson, Tenn., which is part of the Western District of Tennessee, the same district that includes the bankruptcy courtrooms of Memphis.

21. Planes, Trains, Buses Return to Normal – Almost -

NEW YORK (AP) – The nation's planes, trains and buses had their first full day of near-normal service since Thursday, as most passengers stranded by Hurricane Irene slowly made their way home.

22. Hiring Squeeze Highlights Budget -

The Luttrell administration takes a set of proposed budget cuts to Shelby County commissioners Wednesday, June 1, that will mean no 2 percent raise for county employees next fiscal year, no increase in health insurance for county employees and a tighter squeeze on county hiring.

23. Reappraisal Appeals Increase County Red Ink -

As the week began, the Luttrell administration upped the gap between revenues and expenditures in its county operating budget proposal by approximately $4 million.

County chief administrative officer Harvey Kennedy told county commissioners Wednesday the amount of red ink has increased to a total of $16.6 million because of lower revenue estimates for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

24. U of M Symposium to Discuss City’s Place in Law -

Memphis over the years has been at the center of riveting, controversial and far-reaching court cases.

Many of them have either wound up in the history books or simply re-balanced the scales of justice for ordinary people.

25. University of Memphis Law Symposium Planned -

The University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law is hosting a symposium Feb. 11 on “Memphis in the Law” from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. It will celebrate Memphis’ contribution to the legal community.

26. County Commission Overrides Luttrell IT Veto -

Shelby County Commissioners voted Friday to override a veto by County Mayor Mark Luttrell of the ground rules for a new more centralized information technology (IT) system for county government.

27. Commission Approves Optional IT Centralization -

It could be called a virtual piece of political turf.

This week the Shelby County Commission found more than enough political considerations in the question of who should control county government’s information technology.

28. Even in Liberal Bastions, GOP Sees Election Chance -

HYANNIS PORT, Mass. (AP) — In the congressional district that's home to the Kennedy family compound, a Kennedy public skating rink and a Kennedy museum, the heart of liberalism is beating uneasily.

29. Q3 Bankruptcy Reprieve Minor, Temporary -

The judges and clerks in Memphis bankruptcy courtrooms got a small breather between July and September thanks to an atypical drop in bankruptcy activity that was viewed positively but is not expected to last.

30. Kennedy Gives Back to U of M School of Law -

When it comes to his inspiration for entering the legal profession, David S. Kennedy, chief judge of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Tennessee, gives a nod to his father and to Atticus Finch, Harper Lee’s stalwart symbol of fairness for a generation in her novel “To Kill A Mockingbird.”

31. Deimund Named Clinical Director of Methodist Wound Centers -

Sandy Deimund has been named clinical director for the Methodist North and Methodist South Hospital Comprehensive Wound Healing Centers.

Hometown: Cape Girardeau, Mo.
Education:
Certified Wound Specialist (CWS) and a member of the American Academy of Wound Management
Work Experience:
Nurse manager, Methodist South Comprehensive Wound Healing Center; registered nurse, Southeast Hospital in Cape Girardeau, Mo.
Favorite quote:
“Whether you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right.” Henry Ford
Last book read:
“Love ’Em or Lose ’Em” by Beverly L. Kaye
Favorite music:
I like a variety of music, from country to classical.
Favorite movie:
“African Queen”
Sports team:
Tennessee Titans
Activities you enjoy outside of work:
Spending time with friends, sudoku puzzles, traveling, reading
What talent do you wish you had?
I wish I could pick stocks like Warren Buffet.
Who has had the greatest influence on you?
All of the patients who have overcome obstacles in their lives, yet continue to persevere.
Why did you pursue a career in health care?
I have always had an innate curiosity about medicine and people. As a child, my dolls were always sick or injured and needed “health care.”
What drew you to Methodist?
The Christian atmosphere and multiple opportunities available for nurses.
What do you consider your greatest professional accomplishments?
Any time a patient hugs me or shakes my hand and tells me how much they appreciate my efforts is the greatest feeling.
What do you most enjoy about your work?
Working with patients to facilitate their healing process.

32. Bankruptcy Remains On Front Burner -

When two of West Tennessee’s five bankruptcy judges arrive at the University of Memphis’ Downtown law school Monday to address representatives of a U.S. House Judiciary subcommittee, they’ll have plenty to talk about.

33. U.S. Judiciary Cmte. to Hold Field Briefing in Memphis -

A U.S. House Judiciary Committee subcommittee is holding a field briefing in Memphis Monday on “Home Foreclosures in Memphis” at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law Downtown.

34. Springdale Fights Back -

In the mile of Springdale Street between Chelsea and Jackson avenues there are five churches. That’s not counting the churches on side streets.

On Eldridge Avenue, one of those side streets, between two tiny churches is a pair of identical small houses – both boarded up.

The one closest to the corner has faded blue spray paint stenciled across the plywood.

In inner-city Memphis, the stenciling is as familiar as gang graffiti. It’s the mark of the Memphis Police Department’s Blue CRUSH campaign.

Five years into the crackdown guided by a devotion to crime statistics, crime is down in Memphis.

But the statistical drop in crime has come with lingering questions and concerns in Springdale and other neighborhoods with Blue CRUSH houses.

“Once we board them up, we really have to depend on the community to let us know if drug dealers have broken back into them,” Shelby County District Attorney General Bill Gibbons said. “If we don’t know about it, sometimes drug dealers can get right back in there.”

In the neighborhoods, homeowners lament that street level dealers are easily replaced and soon released from jail to resume their place in the neighborhoods – now with a criminal record that makes a move away from drug dealing even more unlikely.

Last year, a team from Memphis that included a police officer, a state prosecutor, a federal prosecutor, a University of Memphis researcher, the head of the Memphis Leadership Foundation and the pastor of one of those five churches along Springdale went to several cities to get training in a new anti-drug strategy.

“We were really interested in changing people’s lives, not locking them up,” Springdale Baptist Pastor Derrick Hughes told The Memphis News. Hughes wasn’t sure at first if he would be part of the Drug Market Intervention (DMI) program.

“It sounded as if possibly it was just another program that was going to possibly just put criminals in jail without rehabilitation,” he said. “And I wanted to make sure that if we were going to be a part of something that it was going to look at rehabilitating the person, changing lives, changing them from a holistic point of view as well as a spiritual point of view.”

Gibbons said some of his prosecutors and some police brass also had their doubts as they looked for an area to test out DMI Memphis style.

“It was based primarily on looking at crime patterns and in particular drug activity in that area,” he told The Memphis News. There was plenty of open drug dealing in the Springdale area.

Drug Market Intervention is picking several street level drug dealers in a community, confronting them with the evidence against them and telling them they have one more chance to get out of the business. The police are involved in making a decision not to prosecute a few as they target dozens of others in an area.

Others on the team are community leaders from the neighborhood. And some are with proven programs to provide job training and other help in getting a legitimate job.

High Point, N.C., was the first stop for the Memphis group because it is the birthplace of DMI. It seems an unlikely example for Memphis with a population of fewer than 100,000. But in 2003, High Point had several open air drug markets. The city’s new police chief, James Fealy, attacked them using what became the DMI strategy.

David Kennedy, director of the Center for Crime Control and Prevention at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, replicated DMI in other cities with money from the federal Bureau of Justice Assistance. The BJA funded the training of the Memphis team and came here.

Kennedy’s philosophy is specific to open air drug markets. It doesn’t pretend to eliminate all drug dealing.

“Open air drug markets are found primarily in our cities and in African-American neighborhoods,” Kennedy wrote in a 2008 article for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Journal. “Although we are loathe to admit it, this issue is soaked in race.”

Kennedy said police complained to him that the families of the drug dealers and others in the surrounding communities knew they were selling drugs, did nothing to stop it and profited from it.

But Kennedy said those living in the communities countered that police were only interested in locking up as many people as they could as part of a conspiracy to destroy the community.

Kennedy said each side had a point and each side was wrong.

“The crime is real and overwhelmingly the arrests are legitimate. But we are destroying the village in order to save it,” he wrote. “And none of this gets rid of the crime. The drug markets and violence continue to exist.”

Kennedy didn’t try to tackle the long-standing racial issues and their lengthy back story. The conversations that formed the basis for the DMI strategy were about drug markets.

It was hard for some on the Memphis team to believe that hardened drug dealers would respond when the threat of arrest, prison time, drive-by shootings and gang turf tripwires hadn’t discouraged them from the life.

Nevertheless, when they returned to Memphis, the planning began for several months of undercover drug buys in the Springdale area by the police Organized Crime Unit. For months, the officers bought repeatedly from dozens of street dealers in a two-mile radius of Springdale. And they recorded the drug buys on video – not just one buy but multiple buys.

Prosecutors reviewed the cases against more than 60 men and women and prosecuted 51 of them. Five were indicted on federal drug charges. Six others – five men and a woman – were the first candidates for the Memphis DMI program.

“It was taking a look at individuals who obviously were involved in drug trafficking, but a little more on the periphery – not an extensive drug record,” Gibbons said.

A few days after New Year’s Day, police descended on the Springdale area serving the arrest warrants and putting up a fresh crop of plywood with blue stenciling on the drug houses in the area. The neighborhood grapevine buzzed anew about the heavy police presence.

It was still buzzing when on the coldest day of the year – Jan. 8 – the Memphis group knocked on six doors in the Springdale area. The temperature never got near freezing and was in single digits part of the day.

No one inside the six houses knew they were coming. No one approaching the doorsteps knew what the reaction inside would be.

It was the first indication the six people involved and inside those homes had that they had sold drugs to undercover Memphis police officers and had been recorded on video making multiple drug sales to the officers.

The father of one of the six was among those who had been arrested.

When the DMI team knocked on his door, his grandmother answered.

“He did not want his grandmother to know why we were standing at the door,” Peggie Russell, the DMI coordinator and a University of Memphis researcher and community resource specialist, said. “He said, ‘It’s OK grandmother.’”

Howard Eddings, president of the Memphis Leadership Foundation, said the young man didn’t deny he was a drug dealer.

“He wanted to basically shut the door,” Eddings told The Memphis News. “She might not have known exactly what he was doing. She was an older lady. He didn’t like the fact that we were knocking on her door.”

He and the other five got a letter asking them to come to Springdale Baptist Church a few days later. If they came, the letter from Police Director Larry Godwin said they would not be prosecuted this time.

For Hughes the pledge was crucial. He wanted to be able to say, “I give you my word, you will not be arrested,” with certainty and conviction.

Five of the six showed up at Hughes’ church where the congregation and other community leaders were waiting in the sanctuary. On the walls were posters of the 51 defendants who weren’t getting the chance they were about to get. The posters included the possible prison sentences those defendants faced.

The five “guests” sat in a reserved front row with a friend or family member.

Their faces blurred in a video of the event, they listened as Assistant District Attorney Amy Weirich told them, “We’ve had it,” and called their names individually. “The Memphis Police Department is tired of picking up dead bodies in the street.”

Russell remembers some denying they had done anything wrong. Then police showed the video.

They watched video of themselves selling drugs numerous times to undercover police officers.

The woman’s denials stopped.

“She got caught during the first time. I don’t necessarily know that we believed it was the first time,” Eddings remembered. “But she was so embarrassed as a mom who had small kids who was put in the spotlight. … All of her junk is coming to the forefront.”

Russell said some of the others were telling those who came with them that they had no idea why they were summoned to the church.

“You’re sitting there and you’re telling your family member, ‘No, I didn’t do it,’” Russell said. “Then the tape started rolling … and you see yourself. It’s reality. You can’t hide it. I think that was a turning point for most of them.”

Hughes told the group of five that the church cared about them and was willing to help.

Some of his congregants spoke up too.

“Our congregants said, ‘Listen, we’re tired of watching you sell drugs. We’re tired of being afraid of coming in and out of our communities. We want our community back,’” Hughes recalled. “During the call in, some of our residents had an opportunity to look in their faces and say, ‘We are tired of the way you’ve been running down our communities. This used to be a wonderful community where people had pride, where people had hope. … Now a lot of us are afraid.’”

After the tough talk and the confrontation came a commitment to work with the five DMI candidates. Eddings emphasized there are no guarantees.

“We were careful not to promise them that we were going to get them jobs or that even if we could get them a job that it was going to pay them something comparable to what they were making on the street,” he said. ”We said the opposite. We can’t do that at all. But one thing we do know for sure. If you stop doing what you’re doing, you don’t go to jail.”

Russell, who gets much of the credit for pushing to give DMI a try and has become the program’s de facto coordinator, described the response as “something totally new.”

“It’s not about those five,” she said. “They are supposed to stay out of trouble for two years to make the necessary transition in their lives. But it’s really about the Hollywood Springdale community, changing the response of the community to open air drug sales.”

Eddings was surprised by the response.

“Most of these guys’ mamas know what they’re doing. But to know now that other mamas and other grandparents and other church leaders and the community have their eye on you, it has a different motivation,” he said. “Some of these guys are hardened. They’ve been doing it for a while and they’ve been out there on the streets. So, not much embarrasses them. But I could tell by looking at them and even some of the denials.”

The Memphis Leadership Foundation already works with convicted felons trying to make the difficult transition after prison. There are even fewer guarantees for those with a substantial prison record.

Marcus, who didn’t want his last name used, vented about how hard it’s been to find a legitimate job since he did prison time in 2006 for felony drug dealing.

“It’s not like people want to sell drugs,” he began. “On a lot of applications they are saying they don’t discriminate. They’re lying. … They’re ready to end the session right then. They might tear up the application in your face.”

If drug dealers like him bring blight to areas like Springdale and violence and a hard life for law-abiding citizens, Marcus said society has responded with its own brand of hardness.

“They ain’t reaching out anymore,” he said. “They expect for the world to be better because we’re building more jails. We’re putting more cops out. If somebody killed me today – the person who killed me, they want to put him in jail. But why put him in jail when y’all treating this man he killed like he’s a nobody anyway.”

Eddings said with criminal records or without, street level drug dealers have problems as they get older because they have no legitimate work history. He started to say there aren’t transferable skills before thinking about it.

“Actually, some of the skills do transfer. They’ve just got to get access,” he said. “It’s really a reshaping, a little bit more recognition that they need to deal with in terms of how they see themselves and how they can use those skills that they utilize on the streets to do something positive and pursue a legitimate way of life.”

The young man Eddings is working with seems not to have hit the wall that Marcus is at yet.

“He is simply trying to figure out how to put one foot in front of the other. They go from having some source of income to having no source of income,” Eddings told The Memphis News. “We’re convincing him now that getting his GED ought to be a decision that he ought to make. He’s been a little slow in that.”

Hughes said he would get the occasional dope boy showing up at his church before DMI.

“Very rarely. I did hear one or two stragglers you come across who say, ‘Yes, I do want to change.’ Often times, it’s usually because of a pending trial or they are in trouble,” he said. “Since that time, we’ve had a lot of people coming, wanting to change their lives.”

Gibbons is reviewing some neighborhoods where DMI might go next but he’s not saying where because of the undercover police work involved. He wants to see it replicated based on lessons learned in Memphis and he hopes to get a federal grant to hire a full-time coordinator.

The sixth man given a chance in the DMI program didn’t come to the church and was prosecuted. He pleaded guilty to five counts of selling drugs and was sentenced to four years in prison and fined $10,000. But the sentence was suspended and he was put on a diversion program.

Weirich recalled Criminal Court Judge John Fowlkes asking the man why he didn’t respond. He told Fowlkes, “It sounded too good to be true.”

...

35. UPDATE: Harold Ford Jr.'s New York Times Op-Ed -

Former Memphis Congressman Harold Ford Jr. will not run for the U.S. Senate from New York.

He explained his reasons in an op-ed piece in today's New York Times.

Here is the column in its entirety from the New York Times:

36. Evolve Bank & Trust Names Holland to Board -

Evolve Bank & Trust has named Lewis E. Holland to its board of directors.

Holland served six years as president of the regional investment banking firm UMIC Inc., and after its sale in 1988 became a partner at the Memphis office of Ernst & Young LLP.

37. Harold Ford Jr.: 'I Continue to Learn' about NY -

TAPPAN, N.Y. (AP) - Harold Ford Jr. ventured to the suburbs Thursday to test the waters outside New York City for a possible U.S. Senate bid but admitted he still has a lot to learn about the state.

38. Gut-Check for Obama and Dems on Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Abandoning the health care overhaul is not an option, a senior White House official said Wednesday, after President Barack Obama's top domestic initiative took a devastating hit with the Democratic loss of the Massachusetts Senate seat.

39. 3 Democrats – 2 Senators, 1 Governor – to Retire -

WASHINGTON (AP) - With the 2010 election year barely under way, two senators and one governor – all Democrats – ditched plans to run for re-election in the latest signs of trouble for President Barack Obama's party.

40. Wiggins Ready To Grab YLD Baton -

Kyle M. Wiggins is ready to get behind the wheel.

Today at the Memphis Bar Association’s Young Lawyers Division Annual Meeting and Elections, current YLD president Freeman Foster, an attorney for the Juvenile Court of Memphis and Shelby County, will pass the gavel to Wiggins.

41. Brookings Researchers Warn of More Flight Delays -

DALLAS (AP) - Lengthy airline delays are twice as common now as in 1990 and will get worse as the economy recovers, according to a Brookings Institution report released Thursday.

The researchers said much of the problem is due to heavy concentrations of short trips between big cities, but they also cited an "ill-equipped" air traffic control system and other factors.

42. Mass. Senate Delays Debate on Kennedy Interim Bill -

BOSTON (AP) - Massachusetts Republicans temporarily blocked Senate debate Friday on a bill allowing Gov. Deval Patrick to name an interim appointment to the U.S. Senate seat left vacant by the death of Edward Kennedy.

43. Congress Probing SEC's Madoff Failure -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Congress is reopening its inquiry into the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's failure to detect the multibillion-dollar fraud conducted for more than a decade by Bernard Madoff, this time seeking answers from the agency watchdog and potential lessons for lawmakers in crafting new financial rules.

44. Senate Confirms Sotomayor for Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Senate confirmed Sonia Sotomayor Thursday as the first Hispanic justice on the Supreme Court.

The vote was 68-31 for Sotomayor, President Barack Obama's first high court nominee. She becomes the 111th justice and just the third woman to serve.

45. Events -

The Memphis Bar Association will hold a continuing legal education seminar today from noon to 1 p.m. at 200 Jefferson Ave., sixth floor. Judges David Kennedy, Jennie Latta, George Emerson and Paulette Delk will speak about reaffirmation agreements. To register, visit www.memphisbar.org/cle.

46. Events -

The Shelby County Commission’s EOC Appeal Board will meet today at 9:30 a.m. in the fourth floor committee room of the Shelby County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St. The Rules Subcommittee of the Shelby County Ethics Commission will meet at 4 p.m. in Suite 660. For more information, call Steve Summerall at 545-4301.

47. Events -

The Shelby County Commission will hold committee meetings today beginning at 8:30 a.m. in the fourth floor committee room of the Shelby County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St. For more information, call Steve Summerall at 545-4301.

48. Obama: Health Care Reform Essential to Stability -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Praising and prodding Congress, President Barack Obama on Wednesday said a vast reform of the nation's health insurance system is required to head off instability to families, industry and the government itself.

49. House Democrats to Open Hearings on Health Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) - House Democrats are pushing forward with a partisan health care bill even as a key Senate Democrat labors to achieve an elusive bipartisan compromise on President Barack Obama's top legislative priority.

50. Senate Off to a Rocky Start on Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Senate on Wednesday began writing legislation to revamp the nation's health care system, but its historic first step was overshadowed by partisan anger and cost problems that troubled lawmakers on both sides.

51. Kennedy Health Plan Aids Elders, Young Adults -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Proposals that would help disabled seniors and healthy young adults are among dozens of provisions tucked into sweeping health care legislation that senators will begin considering next week.

52. Judges Must Avoid Appearance of Bias, Court Rules -

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that elected judges must step aside from cases when large campaign contributions from interested parties create the appearance of bias.

By a 5-4 vote in a case from West Virginia, the court said that a judge who remained involved in a lawsuit filed against the company of the most generous supporter of his election deprived the other side of the constitutional right to a fair trial.

53. Cohen on Frontlines of Possible Bankruptcy Reform -

David Kennedy, chief bankruptcy judge for the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in West Tennessee, told The Daily News last month he’d like to see Congress make some wholesale changes to the country’s bankruptcy code.

54. ’08 Bankruptcy Filings Swelled With Faltering Economy -

Public television audiences around the U.S. watched Tuesday night as historian Niall Ferguson narrated and hosted “The Ascent of Money,” a two-hour PBS documentary about the evolution of money within a global context.

55. Senate Panel Backs Clinton as Secretary of State -

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted overwhelmingly on Thursday for Hillary Rodham Clinton to become the next secretary of state, with lawmakers saying they were hopeful her leadership would mark a turn from warfare toward diplomacy.

56. ’05 Bankruptcy Amendment To Be Tested in ’09 -

The painful economic slump of 2008 has many vantage points from which the wreckage can be studied.

One of those vantage points is occupied by David Kennedy, chief bankruptcy judge for the U.S. Bankruptcy Court’s West Tennessee Division. From his perch, he has arguably one of the most sweeping and expansive views of the ruin left by the excesses of the country’s financial system.

57. Bush Trying Again to Stem Holiday Flight Delays -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Anticipating another holiday travel crunch, President Bush said on Tuesday that his administration was taking steps to prevent frustrating flight delays during the busy Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday seasons.

58. CCC Ready to Write Off Loan Defaults -

Three Downtown businesses that have filed for bankruptcy protection since December collectively owe the Center City Commission more than $151,000 in unpaid loan debt.

Because of the financial straits each business is confronted with, the CCC does not expect to get any of that money back.

59. Q3 Bankruptcies Up 11 Percent -

At first glance, it might seem like Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks’ Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing this month does not fall in line with the intent of a major revision to the country’s bankruptcy code in 2005.

60. Presidential Debate a Who’s Who of Tennessee Pols -

Its setting was the geographic center of Tennessee’s political universe.

And at Belmont University in Nashville for this week’s second of three highly anticipated presidential debates, it was probably natural the spotlight would turn to the Tennesseans on hand who normally are fixtures in state and federal halls of power.

61. Events -

The Memphis Bar Association will host “How to Prove Your Case” today from noon to 2:15 p.m. The seminar will be held in the courtroom of David S. Kennedy, chief judge of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Tennessee, on the ninth floor at 200 Jefferson Ave. The seminar is worth two hours of continuing legal education credit. Registration will begin at 11:45 a.m. For more information, call the MBA at 527-3573 or visit www.memphisbar.org.

62. Events -

The Charter Commission of Memphis and Shelby County will meet today at 3 p.m. in the fifth floor conference room at City Hall, 125 N. Main St. For more information, call Bridgett Handy-Clay at 576-6511.

63. Economic Sting Still Felt -

A woman and child stop and peruse a display of necklaces inside a Just-A-Buck store that sits in a sprawling retail center along Germantown Parkway. Inexpensive trinkets line the rows of shelves inside.

64. Bush Urges Speedy Action on Economic Rescue Package: 'Crank This Sucker Up' -

WASHINGTON (AP) - It didn't take long for President Bush to find a symbol for his desire to prime the sagging economy.

At a factory in Frederick, Md., Bush eyed a huge, yellow standup lawnmower and declared: "Crank this sucker up."

65. Supreme Court LooksAt FedEx Discrimination Case -      The Supreme Court signaled Tuesday that employees who claim job discrimination should not suffer because of mistakes made by the federal agency charged with investigating their allegations.
    &n

66. Supreme Court Looks at FedEx Age Discrimination Case -

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Supreme Court signaled Tuesday that employees who claim job discrimination should not suffer because of mistakes made by the federal agency charged with investigating their allegations.

67. Apartment Owners May Avoid Court-Enforced Sale with Reorganization Plan -

A federal bankruptcy judge has brokered a compromise in a complicated dispute between two cash-strapped apartment properties and an out-of-state bank.

Part of the solution called for the nonprofit group that owns the two properties - Cornerstone-Cameron & Stonegate Inc. - to submit a business reorganization plan. Should the bankruptcy court approve that plan, the apartments' ownership will avoid a bank-proposed sale of the properties and gain a chance to turn their finances around.

68. From Overton Park to Shelby Farms, Newman No Stranger to Conservancy -

Had he stopped with the famous case he helped win more than three decades ago, Charles Newman's legal career already would have reached a zenith other lawyers could only dream of matching.

As a young attorney in 1971, Newman fought Citizens to Preserve Overton Park v. Volpe all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. The stakes were high; at issue was a decision by then-U.S. Secretary of Transportation John Volpe that would have seen the completion of Interstate 40 in Memphis slice through Midtown's Overton Park.

69. Charges of Default -

Depending on what a federal bankruptcy judge decides, two Memphis apartment properties struggling to make debt payments while trying to overcome insufficient occupancy rates and rental revenue may be put up for sale.

70. High Mortgage Foreclosures Could be Addressed With New Law -

With the number of foreclosures on the rise, a congressman from Illinois has plans to do something about it.

The New York Times reported Sunday that U.S. Sen. Richard J. Durbin, D-Ill., plans to introduce a bill in September that possibly could change bankruptcy laws to address the rising number of mortgage foreclosures.

71. Get Ready, Memphis: Star-Studded Cast On Tap at Media Reform Conference -

It's not every day a person gets to see a member of the Federal Communications Commission jam onstage with a local band like the North Mississippi Allstars.

But attendees can expect that and more at the 2007 National Conference for Media Reform, which kicks off today and continues through Sunday and which will bring to Memphis guests including Hollywood personalities, academics, activists and political celebrities.

72. Just Creeping Along -

For debtors, it can be one of the most insufferable indignities of the bankruptcy process.

When their cars are seized or repossessed by anxious creditors, showing up for work, trekking to the bank and the other mundane tasks that must be accomplished to get a financial fresh start can become logistical nightmares.

73. What Goes Down ... -

Sylvia Ford Brown - who's worked since 1988 as a Chapter 13 trustee in the Southern District of Georgia's bankruptcy court - was once on the short list for a bankruptcy judgeship in West Tennessee.

74. Freefall -

John Madsen - a painter, a craftsman of all things metal, jewelry and woodwork, and an unashamedly proud grandfather - probably thought he couldn't lose.

In July 2005, he began selling his work out of a new art shop and gallery space he opened in the heart of Midtown's Cooper-Young neighborhood. He dubbed the store Dylan Blue in honor of his then-infant grandson of the same name. A garrulous, storytelling man with a thick handlebar moustache and a passion for one-of-a-kind, handmade art, his store broke even in its first 30 days.

75. Bankruptcy Court'sNew Judges Sworn In -     The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit July 1 swore in Paulette J. Delk and George W. Emerson Jr. as U.S. bankruptcy judges for the Western District of Tennessee at Memphis.
    Judge Delk assu

76. CARE Program Seeks to Curb Debt Before It Snowballs -

These days, it seems, everyone is in the red.

The national debt limit Congress allows has been raised four times since 2001, and two months after last hiking the debt ceiling, lawmakers are poised again to max out the government's proverbial credit card.

77. First-Quarter Bankruptcy Filings On Downward Spiral -

Divorce, sickness and job loss. For individuals, those are the big three, the most common factors that cause people to file for bankruptcy protection to wipe away most of their debt or pay back a percentage of it.

78. New Law Is Learning Experience For Bankruptcy Courts -

Change isn't always easy, especially when it comes in the form of a 500-plus page bankruptcy act that took five different Congresses nearly 10 years to pass.

The Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 is the largest overhaul of the nation's bankruptcy laws since 1978. The sweeping changes affect everything from case filing fees to credit counseling and pension plans to corporate bailouts. So how is the local bankruptcy court handling all the changes?

79. Changes to Bankruptcy Court Include New Faces -

Back in early 2005, a bill was floating through Congress for which credit card companies and banks had lobbied for almost a decade.

The legislation had one purpose: to make it harder and more expensive for anyone to get out of debt by filing bankruptcy. With about 1.5 million personal bankruptcies filed each year in the United States, the bill's sponsor, Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, scorned the then-current bankruptcy system as a way for "deadbeats to get out of paying their debts scott-free."

80. Bankruptcy Filings Drop -

It's a scorching afternoon outside, but attorney Jimmy McElroy's air-conditioned office provides a haven from the heat and bustle of the world beyond. Its dim lights, flickering TV images and book-lined walls can only be described as calming.

81. Soldier, Lawyer Celebrates Homecoming -

For much of the past year, Memphis attorney Tommy Fullen has practiced law a world away from his hometown office on a military base in Iraq's rocky southern countryside, where it can get up to 140 degrees in the shade.

82. Local Attorneys Get Turn as Judge, Jury -

Starting over is the theme that fills every corner of David S. Kennedy's courtroom.

He is chief judge of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Tennessee, which each year hears more than 20,000 pleas from debtors looking for a financial fresh start.

83. Events -

The Memphis Bar Association presents "How the Changes in the Bankruptcy Laws Will Affect Domestic Relations Cases" from noon to 1 p.m. today at Dowden Songstad & Worley, 6077 Primacy Parkway, Suite 102. U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge David S. Kennedy is the guest speaker. Visit www.memphisbar.org.

84. Bankruptcy Changes to Hit at Tough Time -

The waiting room on the sixth floor of 200 Jefferson Ave., known among bankruptcy attorneys as the "bus stop," can be a chaotic place. There, rows of debtors wait to speak with their lawyers and meet with the Bankruptcy Court's trustees - a process that has grown so exponentially over the years that a new bankruptcy judge will be named soon to help with the caseload.

85. Bankruptcy Filings Continue Slow Decline -

Due to a new law passed by Congress in April, credit counseling soon will be a mandatory part of filing for bankruptcy. While still high, the number of people who have needed such help in Memphis has seen a gradual decline since 2003, judging by bankruptcy totals.

86. Archived Article: Trends - By Andy Meek

Bankruptcy Act to Have Big Business Impact

ANDY MEEK

The Daily News

In medieval Italy, creditors would break the trading benches of businessmen who didnt pay their debts.

The Italian phrase for that act, banca rotta, is o...

87. Archived Article: Quarterly Lead - By Andy Meek

Bankruptcy Filings Hold Steady

New law expected to prompt filing rush

ANDY MEEK

The Daily News

The day before most Americans mailed off their tax returns last week, the U.S. House of Representatives approved the biggest o...

88. Archived Article: Special Report Lead - By Andy Meek

Bankruptcy Filings See Slight Decline

Local courts await effects of coming legislation

ANDY MEEK

The Daily News

Bankruptcy reform has returned to the national spotlight though for the last nine years it hasnt really been ...

89. Archived Article: Lead - ANDY MEEK

Memphis Braces for Bankruptcy Changes

Federal bill could have unintended effect on local filings

ANDY MEEK

The Daily News

Next month, Congress could put the finishing touches on the biggest overhaul of the nations bankruptcy...

90. Archived Article: Standout - Memphis Standout - Alberto Gutierrez

Gutierrez Looks Forward to Creative Role

LANE GARDNER CAMP

The Daily News

Alberto Gutierrez wants to know if theres a place in Memphis where he can get good breakfast tacos. Thats one thing hes been m...

91. Archived Article: Events - The Memphis Area Association of Realtors hosts a town hall meeting for members at 2 p

The Memphis Area Association of Realtors hosts a town hall meeting for members at 2 p.m. today in the Martin Edwards Jr. Education Center at the MAAR offices, 6...

92. Archived Article: Law Talk - MEGAN CATHEY

Kennedy Earns High Marks for Exciting Job

MEGAN CATHEY

The Daily News

Chief Judge David Kennedy of the Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Tennessee, a seasoned officer of the courts, was appointed to the bankruptcy...

93. Archived Article: Bankruptcy (lead) - Total second quarter filings:

Bankruptcies increase in second quarter

By LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

Accompanying a rise in the Memphis unemployment rate in June, bankruptcy filings continued to increase in West Tennessee in the second qu...

94. Archived Article: Law Focus - Bankruptcy bill could add two judges

Bankruptcy bill could add two judges in W. Tenn.

By LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

If all goes as hoped by U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., bankruptcy judges in West Tennessee soon will see relief.

...

95. Archived Article: Bankruptcy (lead) - In slow economy, bankruptcies remain high

In slow economy, bankruptcies remain high

By STACEY WIEDOWER

The Daily News

The number of bankruptcies filed in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Tennessee rose slightly durin...

96. Archived Article: Law Briefs - Law briefs 02-13-03

Chief Judge of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Tennessee David S. Kennedy will discuss how bankruptcy affects individuals credit, the economy and more at a free Friends of the Library meeting at 11:30 a.m...

97. Archived Article: Law Briefs - Law briefs 02-06-03

The Memphis Chapter of the Association of Legal Administrators monthly membership meeting begins at noon Feb. 13 at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave.

Speaker Melissa Shook of Office Team will discuss recruit...

98. Archived Article: Law Briefs - Health Care Fraud: Enforcement & Compliance Update, a video replay of an American Bar Association TV program, runs from noon

Health Care Fraud: Enforcement & Compliance Update, a video replay of an American Bar Association TV program, run...

99. Archived Article: Law Briefs - Thomas R

Thomas R. Buckner and Henry L. Klein were selected for inclusion in the 2003-2004 edition of The Best Lawyers in America. Both are members of Apperson, Crump & Maxwell. The Memphis Chapter of the Institute of Management Accountants d...

100. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Oct

Calendar of events Oct. 14-Oct. 20

Oct. 14

The Jewish Community Center Theatre, 6560 Poplar Ave., hosts a lottery referendum debate at 7 p.m. Speaking for the lottery referendum is state Sen. Steve Cohen, Student Scho...